Writers Strike Resolution 2023 – Writers Guild of America’s contract with studios

A team of Los Angeles Times journalists analyzed the Writers Guild of America’s contract with studios, marking it up line by line. See the most significant changes, the pivotal arguments and the key subtexts within this historic document.

OCT. 7, 2023 3 AM PT

After 148 days on strike, this is the document that could help get Hollywood going again.

The agreement between Hollywood writers and studios is long: 94 pages. It contains nearly 30,000 words — roughly the length of John Steinbeck’s “Of Mice and Men.” It’s complex, filled with legalese, jargon and sideletters.

Let’s be honest: it’s not easy reading. But it’s vital to the future of the entertainment industry and the Los Angeles region.

That’s why The Times has gathered a team of expert reporters who have covered the strike to annotate the proposed contract changes, highlighting the most significant additions, the pivotal arguments and key subtexts that emerge from a close reading of this historic document. Inside it you’ll find hard-fought victories for writers on minimum staffing in writers rooms and artificial intelligence, compromises hashed out between parties, and seemingly innocuous turns of phrase that could have major consequences.


MEMORANDUM OF AGREEMENT FOR THE 2023 WGA THEATRICAL AND TELEVISION BASIC AGREEMENT

This Memorandum of Agreement (“this Agreement”) is entered into between the Writers Guild of America, West, Inc. and the Writers Guild of America, East, Inc. (collectively “WGA” or “the Guild”), on the one hand, and the Alliance of Motion Picture and Television Producers, Inc. (“AMPTP”), on behalf of the Companies listed in the attached Exhibit “A,” and American Broadcasting Companies, Inc., an indirect wholly-owned subsidiary of ABC, Inc., CBS Broadcasting Inc., and NBCUniversal Media, LLC and Universal Televison LLC (“the Networks”), on the other hand.

, Rathergood TV

Ryan Faughnder, senior editor

”…on the one hand … on the other hand.”

In this corner: The Writers Guild of American (WGA), representing 11,500 film and TV screenwriters.

In the other: The Alliance of Motion Picture and Television Producers (AMPTP), which negotiates on behalf of major studios and streaming services, such as Disney, Warner Bros. Discovery, Netflix and Amazon.

, Rathergood TV

Meg James, senior writer

Founded 90 years ago, the Writers Guild of America has long been at the forefront of Hollywood workers’ fight for labor rights and respect within the entrenched studio system.

The AMPTP was created in simpler times — 1982 — to serve as the labor contract negotiations arm for Hollywood’s major film and TV studios. The then-Big Three TV networks — ABC, CBS and NBC — were seen as equal partners with legacy studios, illustrating the balance of power in the industry for decades.

Click here to jump to the next annotation.

The provisions of the 2020 WGA – AMPTP Theatrical and Television Basic Agreement (“the 2020 WGA – AMPTP MBA”) (including all sideletters), as amended by this Memorandum of Agreement and subject to conforming changes, and as such provisions may be amended pursuant to Article 62, “Contract Adjustment Committee” thereof, shall together constitute and be known as the “2023 Writers Guild of America – Alliance of Motion Picture and Television Producers Theatrical and Television Basic Agreement” or “the 2023 WGA – AMPTP MBA.” The provisions of the 2020 WGA – Network Theatrical and Television Basic Agreement (“the 2020 WGA – Network MBA”) (including all sideletters), as amended by this Memorandum of Agreement and subject to conforming changes, and as such provisions may be amended pursuant to Article 62, “Contract Adjustment Committee” thereof, shall together constitute and be known as the “2023 Writers Guild of America – Network Theatrical and Television Basic Agreement” or the “2023 WGA – Network MBA.” The terms of this Agreement shall prevail over any inconsistent terms of the 2020 WGA – AMPTP MBA or the 2020 WGA – Network MBA. Contract language in this Agreement is indicated by quotation marks or by a notation that the provision is written in contract language.

The terms and conditions set forth in this Memorandum of Agreement shall be effective as of September 25, 2023 (except when another effective date is specified), provided that the memberships of both WGA, West, Inc. and WGA, East, Inc. ratify this agreement no later than October 122023.

, Rathergood TV

Ryan Faughnder, senior editor

“September 25, 2023”

Nearly five months after the writers’ strike began, the WGA and the AMPTP reached their agreement on Sept. 24. The strike officially ended after 148 days, making it the second longest in Hollywood history.

The deal followed five days of intensive negotiations, coming after a weeks-long standstill. Sources on both sides said a key factor in getting the deal done was that the chief executives of four major studios decided to get directly involved in the talks.

1. Term of Agreement (WGA Proposal No. 36)

Three-year term: September 25, 2023 to May 1, 2026.

, Rathergood TV

Ryan Faughnder, senior editor

“May 1, 2026”

The idea that we might be doing this all over again in less than three years is, frankly, exhausting.

The term of the 2023 MBA shall commence on September 25, 2023 and shall continue to and including May 1, 2026.

, Rathergood TV

Ryan Faughnder, senior editor

“shall commence”

Interestingly, not every deal point is effective Sept. 25. For example, the viewership-based bonus structure for streaming programs takes effect for projects released on or after Jan. 1, 2024.

Revise Article 2 to read as follows:

ARTICLE 2 – TERM AND EFFECTIVE DATE OF AGREEMENT

A. GENERAL

1. The term of this Basic Agreement shall commence on M̶a̶y̶ ̶2̶,̶ ̶2̶0̶2̶0̶ September 25, 2023 and shall continue to and include May 1, 2̶0̶2̶3̶ 2026.

, Rathergood TV

Brian Contreras, staff writer

“M̶a̶y̶ ̶2̶,̶ ̶2̶0̶2̶0̶”

Now that we’re getting into the meat of the contract, here’s what you need to know about the (sometimes confusing) way this document is formatted. See those strikethroughs and underlines? The strikethroughs are where text from the last contract is getting deleted; the underlines are where new text has been added in. This here is the most mundane version of that you can possibly imagine — they’re cutting the old start date and replacing it with a new one — but don’t worry, it’ll get more complicated.

2. With respect to all employment agreements with writers in effect on M̶a̶y̶ ̶2̶,̶ ̶2̶0̶2̶0̶ September 25, 2023, the terms of this Basic Agreement relating to minimum compensation and to rights in material shall apply only to services performed and literary material written under such employment contracts where the date of actual employment (i.e., the commitment date) was on or after M̶a̶y̶ ̶2̶,̶ ̶2̶0̶2̶0̶ September 25, 2023, except as specifically otherwise provided herein in Article 2, Section B. or Section C.

, Rathergood TV

Brian Contreras, staff writer

“literary material”

Literary material is a term of art that will come up a lot in this document. It basically encompasses everything a professional Hollywood writer produces: not just their stories and screenplays but also intermediary stuff like outlines, synopses and treatments.

Click here to jump to the next annotation.

3. With respect to literary material licensed or acquired from professional writers (as described herein), the terms of this Basic Agreement relating to minimum compensation and rights in material shall apply only to unpublished and unexploited literary material licensed or acquired from such professional writers on or after M̶a̶y̶ ̶2̶,̶ ̶2̶0̶2̶0̶ September 25, 2023.

Options of unpublished and unexploited literary material obtained from professional writers on or after M̶a̶y̶ ̶2̶,̶ ̶2̶0̶2̶0̶ September 25, 2023 shall be subject only to the provisions of this Basic Agreement relating to options (i.e., third paragraph of Article 13.A., Article 13.B.1.a., Article 16.A.3.d. and Article 16.B.3.i.), and then only to the extent applicable. Disputes relating to the options provisions listed in the preceding sentence shall be subject to grievance and arbitration as provided in Articles 10, 11 and 12 of this Agreement.

4. Company or Guild may, by written notice to the other served not earlier than ninety (90) days nor later than sixty (60) days prior to the expiration date of this Basic Agreement, signify its desire to negotiate a new collective bargaining agreement which shall become effective upon a date determined by mutual agreement between the Company and the Guild.

Such notice shall set forth in detail the proposals or recommendations of the party serving such notice. If such notice is served, the parties agree to commence negotiations covering the proposals or recommendations in the notice, and the proposals and recommendations of the party receiving such notice, within thirty (30) days after the receipt of such notice and to continue such negotiations diligently and in good faith. It is understood and agreed that the existing Basic Agreement shall continue in full force and effect until the termination date above provided.

5. [Deleted]

6. [Appeared as Article 2.A.5. in predecessor Basic Agreements.] Nothing herein contained shall be deemed to modify or affect the terms or conditions of any existing contract which are more favorable to the writer than the terms and conditions of this Basic Agreement.

B. THEATRICAL

1. With respect to all theatrical employment agreements with writers under term or deal contracts which were in effect on M̶a̶y̶ ̶2̶,̶ ̶2̶0̶2̶0̶ September 25, 2023, the new minimum compensations, conditions and Theatrical Schedule A as herein contained shall not in any manner be applicable for the period prior to, nor effective until:

a. in the case of a term contract, the effective date of the exercise of the next option which occurs after M̶a̶y̶ ̶2̶,̶ ̶2̶0̶2̶0̶ September 25, 2023, for the renewal of the employment period, or six (6) months after the effective date of the commencement of the current employment period, whichever occurs first, but in no event prior to M̶a̶y̶ ̶2̶,̶ ̶2̶0̶2̶0̶ September 25, 2023.

b. in the case of a deal contract, the effective date of the next step of such deal contract which commences after M̶a̶y̶ ̶2̶,̶ ̶2̶0̶2̶0̶ September 25, 2023.

2. Any contractual obligation by Company, in effect on December 12, 1966, to give credit for source material or story in connection with a photoplay, shall not in any manner be affected by the provisions of Theatrical Schedule A contained herein.

C. TELEVISION

1. With respect to television employment agreements with writers on a term or week-to-week contract basis in effect on M̶a̶y̶ ̶2̶,̶ ̶2̶0̶2̶0̶ September 25, 2023, the terms of this Basic Agreement relating to rights in material shall apply only to literary material written pursuant to assignments made on or after M̶a̶y̶ ̶2̶,̶ ̶2̶0̶2̶0̶ September 25, 2023.

2. Notwithstanding any other provisions of this Article, the terms of this Basic Agreement relating to rights in material shall not apply to literary material written pursuant to any agreement in effect on M̶a̶y̶ ̶2̶,̶ ̶2̶0̶2̶0̶ September 25, 2023 if the granting or reserving of such rights, as herein provided, would conflict with any contractual obligation of the Company to any third party entered into prior to the effective date of this Basic Agreement; provided that the Company does not have a right to require the removal or elimination of the conflict created by such contractual obligation to the third party.”

Make conforming changes as needed.

2. Minimums (WGA Proposal No. 1)

, Rathergood TV

Ryan Faughnder, senior editor

“Minimums”

Now the good stuff: The money!

Took a little contract lingo throat-clearing to get here.

a. Subject to Item 3 below (Diversion to Pension Plan or Health Fund), the minimum rates listed in this subparagraph “a.” below shall be increased in each year of the 2023 MBA on a compounded basis, as follows:

i. Five percent (5%) effective September 25, 2023 by the memberships of WGA West, Inc. and WGA East, Inc.;

ii. Four percent (4%) effective May 2, 2024; and

iii. Three and one-half percent (3.5%) effective May 2, 2025.

, Rathergood TV

Ryan Faughnder, senior editor

“Five percent (5%) … Four percent (4%) … Three and one-half percent (3.5%)”

Adding some context here: The WGA came in looking for raises of 6% in Year One, 5% in Year Two and 5% in Year Three. The studios before the strike had offered 4%, 3%, and 2%.

They ended up agreeing to 5%, 4% and 3.5%, with some caveats. So they wound up pretty much in the middle in terms of guild minimums.

, Rathergood TV

Wendy Lee, staff writer

This 5%, 4%, 3.5% ladder matches the increase in wages that the Directors Guild of America negotiated with the AMPTP earlier this year.

ARTICLE 13

13.A.1.a. Flat Deal Screen Minimums

13.A.2. Narration – Rate Schedule A

13.A.10. Week-to-Week, Term, Flat Deal

13.A.15. Minimum Weekly Compensation (Week-to-Week or Term Contracts)

13.B.7.a. Story Minimums – Other Than Network Prime Time or Serials Covered by Article 13.B.7.e.(1) or e.(3)

13.B.7.b. Teleplay Minimums – Other Than Network Prime Time or Serials Covered by Article 13.B.7.e.(1) or e.(3)

, Rathergood TV

Brian Contreras, staff writer

“Story” … “Teleplay”

Some terms from the underlying WGA contract to know (again, they’ll be coming up a lot): A story lays out what the characters will be up to but doesn’t need any dialogue, while a teleplay is a final script that includes both scenes and dialogue.

13.B.7.c. Story and Teleplay – Other Than Network Prime Time or Serials Covered by Article 13.B.7.e.(1) or e.(3)

13.B.7.d.(1) Story Minimums – Network Prime Time

13.B.7.d.(2) Teleplay Minimums – Network Prime Time

13.B.7.d.(3) Story and Teleplay Minimums – Network Prime Time

13.B.7.e.(3) Serial Rates – Prime Time

13.B.7.g. Plot Outline – Narrative Synopsis of Story Minimums

13.B.7.h.(1) Rewrite Minimums

13.B.7.h.(2) Polish Minimums

13.B.7.m.(1) Format Minimums

13.B.7.m.(2) Bible Minimums

, Rathergood TV

Meg James, senior writer

“Bible”

Screenwriting is often a collaborative process that involves different phases, including outlines, rewrites and creating the “bible,” which is a reference book for the writing team that includes information about characters and their backstories, location descriptions and other significant plot points.

Click here to jump to the next annotation.

13.B.7.m.(3) Rewrite or Polish of Format or Bible

13.B.7.n. Narration Rate Schedules A, B, C

13.B.7.p. Non-Commercial Openings and Closings

13.B.7.s.(2) Week-to-Week and Term Employment

ARTICLE 14

14.G. Program Fees

14.K.1. Minimum Compensation – Rate Per Week (except as provided in Item 9 below for certain Article 14 writers other than story editors/executive story editors)

ARTICLE 15

15.B.14.a.(1) Additional Compensation for Certain Use of Material to and (2) Which Separated Rights Do Not Apply

15.B.14.c. Additional Compensation for Certain Use of Material to Which Separated Rights Do Not Apply – Radio

15.B.14.h.(1), (2) and (3.2) Character Payments

15.B.14.l.(1) and (2) Teleplay as Basis of Pilot

ARTICLE 16

16.A.5.c. Sequel Payments for Programs Other than Programs 1st paragraph Made Principally for the Videodisc/Videocassette Market

16.B.2.a. Sequel Payments

APPENDIX A

13.B.2.a. Comedy-Variety — Per Program Minimum Compensation

13.B.2.b.(1) Comedy-Variety Programs — Minimum Variety Show Commitment

13.B.2.b.(3) Comedy-Variety Programs – Aggregate Minimum Compensation Per Weekly Unit of Five Programs

13.B.2.g. Comedy-Variety Programs — Pre-Production Periods

13.B.3. Comedy-Variety Programs — Self-Contained Portions of Programs

13.B.4.a. and b. Quiz and Audience Participation Programs

13.B.6.a.(1)(a) Once Per Week or Less, Non-Dramatic Programs

13.B.6.a.(1)(b)(i) Minimum Series Commitment

13.B.6.b.(1)(a), 13.B.6.b.(1)(c) Non-Dramatic Strip Programs

13.B.7.d.(2) Assigned Outlines

13.B.8.b.(1) Documentary Programs – Story and Telescript

13.B.8.b.(2) Documentary Programs – Story Only

13.B.8.b.(3) Documentary Programs – Telescript Only

13.B.8.c.(1) Narrative Synopsis of Story

13.B.8.d. Rewrite or Polish Minimum Compensation

APPENDIX B

Paragraph D.3.a.(1) Residuals for use in pay television and/or videodisc/videocassette markets of a covered dramatic program of a type generally produced for prime time network television that is produced principally for pay television or a covered comedy-variety program as defined in Article 1.C.22. of Appendix A.

, Rathergood TV

Brian Contreras, staff writer

“videodisc/videocassette”

Suffice it to say that writers talked a lot more about AI and streaming during the strike than they did, uh….. videocassettes.

, Rathergood TV

Meg James, senior writer

Yes, but this comes back to a trend we’ve seen many times. Labor disputes typically occur when new technology disrupts existing practices.

In 1981, the WGA went on strike for 96 days to gain a share of what was then new tech: the fast-growing videocassette market. At the time, the WGA hailed its gains for the new coverage area, saying it was the biggest breakthrough for the guild in two decades. (Actors unions SAG and AFTRA had gone on strike the year before, 1980, also over VHS residuals.)

APPENDIX C

Paragraph 2.b.(1) Made For Basic Cable One-Hour High Budget Dramatic Programs or Series In Their Second or Subsequent Season

, Rathergood TV

Brian Contreras, staff writer

Made For Basic Cable One-Hour High Budget Dramatic Programs”

It’s fascinating to see how granularly the contract breaks down different categories of what most viewers would just call “film” or “TV.”

SIDELETTER ON LITERARY MATERIAL WRITTEN FOR PROGRAMS MADE FOR NEW MEDIA

, Rathergood TV

Meg James, senior writer

“NEW MEDIA”

The term “new media” was widely used in 2007 to describe online distribution. At the time, streaming wasn’t a thing and writers felt burned that residuals for DVDs were much lower than TV broadcasts. They also stiffened over studio requests to create short “webisodes” for the internet to market their TV shows. The major win of the WGA’s 2007-2008 strike was including shows made for “new media” as guild-covered work.

, Rathergood TV

Ryan Faughnder, senior editor

“New media” is a somewhat antiquated term. Nowadays it mainly means streaming, including subscription- and ad-based services.

Paragraph 3.b.(5)(c) Sequel Payments for “Original New Media Productions”

Para. 4.c.(1) Initial Compensation for High Budget SVOD Programs intended for initial exhibition on a subscription consumer pay new media platform with 20 million or more subscribers in the United States and Canada (except as provided in Item 20 below for certain High Budget SVOD Programs 96 minutes or more in length)

, Rathergood TV

Ryan Faughnder, senior editor

“High Budget SVOD Programs”

We need a glossary.

SVOD stands for “subscription video on-demand,” which encompasses Netflix and other streaming services that provide access to content in exchange for a recurring fee.

AVOD is “advertising-based video on-demand,” so streaming services with commercials.

, Rathergood TV

Ryan Faughnder, senior editor

“20 million or more subscribers”

Curious who this applies to? Netflix, Hulu and Disney+ all fall under this category, for example. They have way more than 20 million domestic subscribers.

Para. 4.c.(2) Initial Compensation for High Budget SVOD Programs intended for initial exhibition on a subscription consumer pay new media platform with fewer than 20 million subscribers in the United States and Canada.

b. Subject to Item 3 below (Diversion to Pension Plan or Health Fund), the minimum rates for daytime serials (Appendix A, Article 13.B.5.a.(1), (2), (5) and (8) and Article 16.B.2.a.(5)) shall be increased on a compounded basis, as follows:

Three and one-half percent (3.5%) effective the first Sunday following the AMPTP’s receipt of notice of ratification by the memberships of WGA West, Inc. and WGA East, Inc.;

Three percent (3%) effective May 2, 2024; and

Three percent (3%) effective May 2, 2025.

, Rathergood TV

Ryan Faughnder, senior editor

“Three and one-half percent”

This part of the agreement contains a sideletter that went into effect in 2008, at the end of the last WGA strike, which helped established important gains for writers when online entertainment was still in an early enough stage to be called “new media.”

That contract was important because it laid the groundwork for writers getting their due from stuff they wrote for the Internet, mobile devices, etc. At that time, streaming was just getting started and no one really knew what the business was going to look like. Was online distribution going to be a side business, or would it turn out to be everything to Hollywood? I think we pretty much know the answer now.

Click here to jump to the next annotation.

Subject to Item 3 below (Diversion to Pension Plan or Health Fund), the minimum rates for news programs (Appendix A, Article 13.B.8.b.(4)) shall be increased on a compounded basis, as follows:

Three percent (3%) effective the first Sunday following the AMPTP’s receipt of notice of ratification by the memberships of WGA West, Inc. and WGA East, Inc.;

Three percent (3%) effective May 2, 2024; and

Three percent (3%) effective May 2, 2025.

The “up to two minute” rates for Derivative New Media Programs in Paragraph 2.a. of the Sideletter on Literary Material Written for Programs Made for New Media shall be increased by two percent (2%) effective the first Sunday following the AMPTP’s receipt of notice of ratification by the memberships of WGA West, Inc. and WGA East, Inc., as follows:https://javascript:;/

In addition, add the following sentence to the end of Paragraph 2.a. of the Sideletter on Literary Material Written for Programs Made for New Media:

“In no event shall the minimum initial compensation for a Derivative New Media Production exceed the initial compensation due for the same program if produced for free television.”

e. The residual bases in Article 15.B.1.b.(2)(c) for reruns in network non-prime time, syndication and basic cable (as set forth in Article 15.B.1.b.(3)(a)) shall be increased by:

, Rathergood TV

Brian Contreras, staff writer

“residual bases”

Residuals are payouts a writer (or actor or director) gets when something they worked on enters reruns or moves to a secondary market. Think of “Avatar: The Way of Water” shifting from theaters to DVD and Blu-ray, or “The Office” going onto streaming platforms after it first aired on NBC. As you can see here, residuals are structured differently for different types of media.

I wrote more about it here: “What are residuals and how do they work? A Hollywood strike battleground, explained”

Click here to jump to the next annotation.

  1. Three percent (3%) effective the first Sunday following the AMPTP’s receipt of notice of ratification by the memberships of WGA West, Inc. and WGA East, Inc.;
  2. Three percent (3%) effective May 2, 2024; and
  3. Three percent (3%) effective May 2, 2025.

f. The rates for network prime time reruns (Article 15.B.1.b.(2)(a)) shall be increased by two percent (2%) effective May 2, 2024.

g. The residual bases for High Budget SVOD Programs shall be increased as provided below in Item 20.

h. The rates for excerpt payments (Article 15.A.3.j., Article 15.B.10.c., d. and dd., Article 15.B.13.j. and Appendix A, Article 15.B.3.b.) shall be increased by five percent (5%) effective May 2, 2024.

i. The rates for Sequel Payments for Programs Made Principally for the Videodisc/Videocassette Market (Article 16.A.5.c., 2nd para.) shall remain the same as those in effect on May 1, 2023.

j. Publication Fee (Article 16.A.10.). The Article 16.A.10. publication fee shall remain the same as that in effect on May 1, 2023.

k. Upset Price (Article 16.B.5.). The upset price figures in Article 16.B.5. shall be increased by two percent (2%) effective May 2, 2024.

l. Article 25. The rate in Article 25 shall increase in the same manner as in the 2020 MBA.

3. Diversion to Pension Plan or Health Fund (WGA Proposal No. 20)

Add the following footnote (or references thereto) to the contribution rates set forth in Article 17.B.1. and Article 17.C.1. to provide that the Guild has the right, as of May 2, 2024, to divert up to one-half of one percent (0.5%) from certain salary minimums and a further right, as of May 2, 2025, to divert up to an additional one-half of one percent (0.5%) from certain salary minimums to increase the contribution rates to the Pension Plan or Health Fund. Any pension contribution rate increases as a result of such diversion(s) shall be decoupled from benefits. (Make conforming changes, including adding footnotes to the applicable salary rate minimums that reference that they are subject to the diversion in the second and third years of the Agreement.)

, Rathergood TV

Brian Contreras, staff writer

“Add the following footnote”

These italicized notes under a lot of the section headers tend to summarize what the subsequent legalese is trying to get at. Sorta like reading the CliffsNotes of “To Kill a Mockingbird” back in high school….

Click here to jump to the next annotation.

“During the 2023 negotiations, the parties agreed that the Guild shall have the authority, in its sole discretion, to elect to increase either the pension contribution rate in Article 17.B.1. or the health contribution rate in Article 17.C.1. by up to one-half percent (0.5%) in each of the second and third years of the 2023 Basic Agreement (i.e., effective May 2, 2024 and May 2, 2025, respectively) as provided herein. Should the Guild elect to increase the pension or health contribution rates for the second year and/or third year, the increases in minimum salary rates (other than the minimum salary rates for Derivative New Media Productions in Paragraph 2.a. of the Sideletter on Literary Material Written for Programs Made for New Media) shall be reduced by one-half percent (0.5%) for the period May 2, 2024 through May 1, 2025 and/or the period May 2, 2025 through May 1, 2026, respectively. If the Guild elects to divert increases as provided herein, it shall provide the AMPTP, the Networks and the Company with advance notice of its election at least six (6) months prior to the first day in the period in which the increases to the pension and/or health contributions rates are to take effect. To the extent the WGA elects to allocate any increases to the pension contribution rate, the increase shall be decoupled from benefits.”

4. Increase Health Fund Contribution Rate by 0.5% Effective May 2, 2024 (WGA Proposal No. 37)

Modify Article 17.C.1. as follows (contract language is in quotes, new text is underlined and deletions are lined through):

C. HEALTH FUND

The health fund, established and known as the “Writers Guild-Industry Health

Fund,” is funded and administered as follows:

1. Company agrees to contribute to the Health Fund amounts equal in the aggregate to eleven and one-half percent (11.5%) (twelve percent (12%) effective May 2, 2024)1 of all “gross compensation” earned and paid or due to writers for all services covered by and subject to this Agreement performed on or after the effective date hereof, in an employment capacity (to which employment the provisions of this Basic Agreement apply). “In connection with the purchase of literary material from a professional writer, if the Company also employs the writer under this Basic Agreement for at least one rewrite or polish (as required in Articles 16.A.3.c. and 16.B.3.h., or otherwise), the Company shall contribute to the Health Fund for such rewrite or polish an amount equal to eleven and one-half percent (11.5%) (twelve percent (12%) effective May 2, 2024)2 of the sum of the purchase price, up to the [Internal Revenue Code] Section 401(a)(17) limit, plus the amount paid for such rewrite or polish, but in no event shall the Company be required to make such contributions on sums in excess of the ceiling set forth in Article 17.B.1.e. or this Article 17.C.1.”
[1See Item 3 above.]

Make conforming changes as needed.

Not interested in this part? Jump ahead to the good stuff

Writers rooms were a point of contention. Click here to learn all about them.

5. Pension Plan and Health Fund Contribution Caps Apply to Individual Writers on Teams (WGA Proposal No. 19)

Modify Articles 17.B.1. and 17.C.1. to apply Pension Plan and Health Fund contribution caps for scripts and weeklies for writers on teams, as follows (contract language is in quotes, new text is underlined and deletions are lined through):

B. PENSION PLAN

“The Pension Plan, established and known as the “Producer-Writers Guild of America Pension Plan,” is funded and administered as follows:

“Notwithstanding other provisions of this Basic Agreement in which writing teams are treated as a “single writer” for the purposes of Article 17, each individual in a writing team shall receive contributions up to 100% of the ceiling as if he or she is a sole writer. In addition, each individual on a writing team of two (2) or three (3) employed pursuant to Article 13.A.15., Article 13.B.7.s. or Article 14.K. shall receive contributions on no less than the full weekly minimum but in no event more than the ceilings set forth in subparagraph e. below.

“The term “gross compensation,” as used herein, shall include amounts paid to an employee as compensation with respect to such services as a writer … but shall not include:

a. Compensation in excess of $225,000 for each writer, regardless of whether that writer is part of a writing team o̶r̶ ̶$̶4̶5̶0̶,̶0̶0̶0̶ ̶i̶n̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶c̶a̶s̶e̶ ̶o̶f̶ ̶a̶ ̶t̶e̶a̶m̶ ̶o̶f̶ ̶t̶h̶r̶e̶e̶ ̶(̶3̶)̶ ̶w̶r̶i̶t̶e̶r̶s̶, in connection with any single theatrical motion picture; it being understood that any percentage shall be paid only on the first $225,000 for each writer, regardless of whether that writer is part of a writing team, o̶f̶ ̶a̶ ̶w̶r̶i̶t̶e̶r̶’̶s̶ ̶g̶r̶o̶s̶s̶ ̶c̶o̶m̶p̶e̶n̶s̶a̶t̶i̶o̶n̶,̶ ̶o̶r̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶f̶i̶r̶s̶t̶ ̶$̶4̶5̶0̶,̶0̶0̶0̶ ̶i̶n̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶c̶a̶s̶e̶ ̶o̶f̶ ̶a̶ ̶t̶e̶a̶m̶ ̶o̶f̶ ̶t̶h̶r̶e̶e̶ ̶(̶3̶)̶ ̶w̶r̶i̶t̶e̶r̶s̶,̶ in connection with any such motion picture.12

e. In connection with any television motion picture, gross compensation in excess of the greater of the following: (1) the aggregate of two and one-half (2½) times the applicable minimum initial compensation for each writer, regardless of whether that writer is part of a team (̶a̶t̶ ̶o̶n̶e̶ ̶h̶u̶n̶d̶r̶e̶d̶ ̶f̶i̶f̶t̶y̶ ̶p̶e̶r̶c̶e̶n̶t̶ ̶(̶1̶5̶0̶%̶)̶ ̶o̶r̶ ̶t̶w̶o̶ ̶h̶u̶n̶d̶r̶e̶d̶ ̶p̶e̶r̶c̶e̶n̶t̶ ̶(̶2̶0̶0̶%̶)̶,̶ ̶w̶h̶i̶c̶h̶e̶v̶e̶r̶ ̶i̶s̶ ̶a̶p̶p̶l̶i̶c̶a̶b̶l̶e̶ ̶f̶o̶r̶ ̶a̶ ̶t̶e̶a̶m̶ ̶o̶f̶ ̶t̶h̶r̶e̶e̶ ̶(̶3̶)̶ ̶w̶r̶i̶t̶e̶r̶s̶)̶ under this Basic Agreement; or (2) the initial compensation agreed upon in the individual employment contract; provided, however, in no event will compensation in excess of one hundred seventy thousand dollars ($170,000) for each writer, regardless of whether that writer is part of a team,o̶r̶ ̶i̶n̶ ̶e̶x̶c̶e̶s̶s̶ ̶o̶f̶ ̶t̶h̶r̶e̶e̶ ̶h̶u̶n̶d̶r̶e̶d̶ ̶f̶o̶r̶t̶y̶ ̶t̶h̶o̶u̶s̶a̶n̶d̶ ̶d̶o̶l̶l̶a̶r̶s̶ ̶(̶$̶3̶4̶0̶,̶0̶0̶0̶)̶ ̶i̶n̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶c̶a̶s̶e̶ ̶o̶f̶ ̶a̶ ̶t̶e̶a̶m̶ ̶o̶f̶ ̶t̶h̶r̶e̶e̶ ̶(̶3̶)̶ ̶w̶r̶i̶t̶e̶r̶s̶,̶ ̶ be included in gross compensation with respect to pilots thirty (30) minutes or less in length; and, provided further, in no event will compensation in excess of two hundred twenty-five thousand dollars ($225,000) for each writer, regardless of whether that writer is part of a team,o̶r̶ ̶i̶n̶ ̶e̶x̶c̶e̶s̶s̶ ̶o̶f̶ ̶f̶o̶u̶r̶ ̶h̶u̶n̶d̶r̶e̶d̶ ̶f̶i̶f̶t̶y̶ ̶t̶h̶o̶u̶s̶a̶n̶d̶ ̶d̶o̶l̶l̶a̶r̶s̶ ̶(̶$̶4̶5̶0̶,̶0̶0̶0̶)̶ ̶i̶n̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶c̶a̶s̶e̶ ̶o̶f̶ ̶a̶ ̶t̶e̶a̶m̶ ̶o̶f̶ ̶(̶3̶)̶ ̶w̶r̶i̶t̶e̶r̶s̶,̶ be included in gross compensation with respect to a pilot more than thirty (30) minutes in length or with respect to non-episodic, non-serial television motion pictures or multi-part, closed-end series, which motion pictures or series are 120 minutes or more in length; and, provided further, in no event will compensation in excess of three hundred fifty thousand dollars ($350,000) per Company per calendar year for each writer, regardless of whether that writer is part of a team,o̶r̶ ̶i̶n̶ ̶e̶x̶c̶e̶s̶s̶ ̶o̶f̶ ̶s̶e̶v̶e̶n̶ ̶h̶u̶n̶d̶r̶e̶d̶ ̶t̶h̶o̶u̶s̶a̶n̶d̶ ̶d̶o̶l̶l̶a̶r̶s̶ ̶(̶$̶7̶0̶0̶,̶0̶0̶0̶)̶ ̶p̶e̶r̶ ̶C̶o̶m̶p̶a̶n̶y̶ ̶p̶e̶r̶ ̶c̶a̶l̶e̶n̶d̶a̶r̶ ̶y̶e̶a̶r̶ ̶i̶n̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶c̶a̶s̶e̶ ̶o̶f̶ ̶a̶ ̶t̶e̶a̶m̶ ̶o̶f̶ ̶t̶h̶r̶e̶e̶ ̶(̶3̶)̶ ̶w̶r̶i̶t̶e̶r̶s̶, be included in gross compensation with respect to serials covered under Article 13.B.5 of Appendix A.13

C. HEALTH FUND

“Such amounts shall be contributed as and when the compensation is paid to the writer. The term “gross compensation” is used in Article 17.C. as defined in Article 17.B. and is subject to the same ceilings and exceptions provided for in said Article 17.B., except that for purposes of Health Fund contribution ceilings, “gross compensation” shall not include compensation in excess of $250,000 for each writer, regardless of whether that writer is part of a team,̶ ̶o̶r̶ ̶$̶5̶0̶0̶,̶0̶0̶0̶ ̶i̶n̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶c̶a̶s̶e̶ ̶o̶f̶ ̶a̶ ̶t̶e̶a̶m̶ ̶o̶f̶ ̶t̶h̶r̶e̶e̶ ̶(̶3̶)̶ ̶w̶r̶i̶t̶e̶r̶s̶,̶ in connection with any single theatrical motion picture or non-episodic, non serial television motion pictures or multi-part closed-end series, which motion pictures or series are 120 minutes or more in length; it being understood that any percentage for Health Fund contributions shall be paid only on the first $250,000 for each writer, regardless of whether that writer is part of a team, o̶f̶ ̶a̶ ̶w̶r̶i̶t̶e̶r̶’̶s̶ ̶g̶r̶o̶s̶s̶ ̶c̶o̶m̶p̶e̶n̶s̶a̶t̶i̶o̶n̶,̶ ̶o̶r̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶f̶i̶r̶s̶t̶ ̶$̶5̶0̶0̶,̶0̶0̶0̶ ̶i̶n̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶c̶a̶s̶e̶ ̶o̶f̶ ̶a̶ ̶t̶e̶a̶m̶ ̶o̶f̶ ̶t̶h̶r̶e̶e̶ ̶(̶3̶)̶ ̶w̶r̶i̶t̶e̶r̶s̶,̶ ̶in connection with any such motion picture.”

Make conforming changes as needed.

6. Guaranteed Second Step for Theatrical Screenplays for Writers Paid 200% or Less of Minimum (WGA Proposal No. 3)

, Rathergood TV

Ryan Faughnder, senior editor

“Second Step”

One of the WGA’s less sexy but still important goals was for studios to guarantee a “second-step” payment for writers so they wouldn’t be in a situation where they were asked to do a second draft of their movie script (after getting notes from the studio, of course) without additional compensation. Screenwriters had long complained that they were effectively doing rewrites for free.

Add a new Article 13.A.1.c. to provide for a guaranteed second step for theatrical screenplays, as follows (contract language is in quotes; new text is underlined; deletions are lined through):

“c. When a Company employs a writer to write the first draft of a screenplay (including or excluding treatment), or purchases a screenplay from a professional writer (other than a screenplay subject to Article 16.A.3.c.) at two hundred percent (200%) or less of the applicable minimum compensation for the screenplay as provided in Article 13.A.1.a.(1) or (2) (including the amount set forth in Article 13.A.1.a.(9), if applicable), the Company shall be required to employ the writer to write a rewrite at no less than the applicable minimum compensation as provided in Article 13.A.1.a.(3). If the writer is unable to perform the rewrite for the Company, no compensation for the rewrite is owed to the writer and the Company may engage another writer if it chooses.”

Make conforming changes as needed, including to Article 13.A.12.

7. Payments for Screenwriters Employed on Flat Deals at Compensation Not Exceeding 200% of Applicable Minimum Compensation (WGA Proposal No. 6)

Modify the last paragraph of Article 13.A.3. to provide for installment payments of compensation due for a theatrical motion picture, as follows (contract language is in quotes; new text is underlined; deletions are lined through):

ARTICLE 13 – COMPENSATION

A. THEATRICAL

“3. Initial Payment

“The Company shall use its best efforts to issue to the writer (or his/her designated representative), for the writer’s signature, a written document memorializing the agreement reached between the Company and the writer within ten (10) business days after agreement is reached on the major deal points of a writing assignment (e.g., agreement on initial compensation, including bonus, if any, and number of drafts) for a theatrical motion picture (twelve (12) business days in the case of either a term writing agreement or an agreement for both writing and non-writing services), but in no event later than the earlier of: (a) fifteen (15) business days after agreement is reached on the major deal points of the writing assignment, or (b) the time period required by Article 19. Disputes as to whether Company has submitted such document in a timely manner may be submitted to the “Hot Line” dispute resolution procedure in Article 48.

, Rathergood TV

Brian Contreras, staff writer

“‘Hot Line’ dispute resolution procedure”

Readers keep asking me how the contract actually gets enforced. Here’s a peek into one of the processes: Writers who believe studios failed to meet their obligations — and studios that believe writers failed to meet their obligations — have somewhere to turn. It’s designed to be a quick way for a representative on one side to contact the other side and try to work things out.

I really wish I could tell you the “Hot Line” is a literal phone line, maybe with bright red receivers and operators constantly standing by. But that doesn’t seem to be the case.

Click here to jump to the next annotation.

“Company shall attach a cover sheet to the document memorializing the agreement reached between the Company and the writer which sets forth in summary form all conditions precedent which must be satisfied before writing services can commence. The terms of such cover sheet shall not alter or vary the terms of the agreement reached between the Company and the writer, and, in any event, the terms of the writer’s agreement shall prevail.

“With respect to a writer employed on a flat deal basis under this Article13.A. at compensation of twice the applicable minimum compensation or less: a̶n̶y̶ ̶e̶m̶p̶l̶o̶y̶m̶e̶n̶t̶ ̶u̶n̶d̶e̶r̶ ̶t̶h̶i̶s̶ ̶A̶r̶t̶i̶c̶l̶e̶ ̶1̶3̶.̶A̶.̶ ̶o̶n̶ ̶a̶ ̶f̶l̶a̶t̶ ̶d̶e̶a̶l̶ ̶b̶a̶s̶i̶s̶,̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ Company will pay to the writer, not later than the next regular payday in the week following the day the Company instructs the writer to commence h̶i̶s̶/̶h̶e̶r̶ services, a single advance amount (to be applied against the first compensation which otherwise would be due to the writer) at least fifty percent (50%) e̶q̶u̶a̶l̶ ̶t̶o̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶g̶r̶e̶a̶t̶e̶r̶ ̶o̶f̶ ̶(̶a̶)̶ ̶t̶e̶n̶ ̶p̶e̶r̶c̶e̶n̶t̶ ̶(̶1̶0̶%̶)̶ of the writer’s agreed compensation which otherwise would be due to the writer upon delivery of the first required material,̶ ̶o̶r̶ ̶(̶b̶)̶ ̶o̶n̶e̶ ̶w̶e̶e̶k̶’̶s̶ ̶c̶o̶m̶p̶e̶n̶s̶a̶t̶i̶o̶n̶ ̶a̶t̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶w̶e̶e̶k̶l̶y̶ ̶r̶a̶t̶e̶ ̶f̶o̶r̶ ̶t̶e̶r̶m̶ ̶e̶m̶p̶l̶o̶y̶m̶e̶n̶t̶ ̶f̶o̶r̶ ̶1̶4̶ ̶o̶u̶t̶ ̶o̶f̶ ̶1̶4̶ ̶w̶e̶e̶k̶s̶. If a writer has not yet delivered the required material within nine (9) weeks after the day the Company instructs the writer to commence services, and upon submission of an invoice by the writer, the Company will pay an additional advance amount (to be applied against the compensation which otherwise would be due the writer) of at least twenty-five percent (25%) of the writer’s agreed compensation which would otherwise be due to the writer upon delivery of the required material.”

, Rathergood TV

Meg James, senior writer

“a single advance amount”

Movie screenwriters have complained about the theatrical pay structure that often meant going months and months without a paycheck. The system, they said, allowed abuse because writers would spend weeks, even months, doing rewrites for free.

The new provisions require at least half of their fee be paid upfront, plus a quarter of their fee nine weeks into the job and the rest upon delivery of their finished work.

Make conforming changes as needed, including but not limited to Article 13.A.12.

8. Script Fees for Staff Writers (WGA Proposal No. 7-C)

Modify Article 13.B.7.s.(2)(e) and (h) to provide that staff writers employed on a term basis shall be separately compensated for all formats, stories and teleplays written during the term, as follows (contract language is in quotes; deletions are lined through):

“ARTICLE 13 – COMPENSATION

, Rathergood TV

Wendy Lee, staff writer

“COMPENSATION”

Streaming services’ business model has changed writers’ pay and the stability of their jobs across the board, writers have contended.

Rasheed Newson — an executive producer and co-developer of “Bel-Air,” which streams on NBCUniversal’s Peacock platform — said studios had been asking productions to get by with fewer writers. “Everything at this point is so efficient, everything’s been cut to so many bare bones, the only thing left to squeeze are people,” Newson said.

Click here to jump to the next annotation.

“B. TELEVISION

“7. Schedule of Minimum Compensation

“s. Week-to-Week and Term Employment

“(2) The Company may employ writers on a term contract basis as follows:

“(e) All formats, stories and teleplays written by a writer employed on a term basis shall be separately compensated, without any offset, credit or allocation of any kind against or by any other compensation of any kind due to said writer. Compensation to such writer for a format, story and/or teleplay shall include compensation for any polish(es) or rewrite(s) of that format, story and/or teleplay written during the writer’s term of employment.

“With respect to any other literary material written during the writer’s term of employment, in no event shall the writer I̶n̶ ̶n̶o̶ ̶e̶v̶e̶n̶t̶ ̶s̶h̶a̶l̶l̶ ̶a̶ ̶w̶r̶i̶t̶e̶r̶ ̶e̶m̶p̶l̶o̶y̶e̶d̶ ̶o̶n̶ ̶a̶ ̶ ̶t̶e̶r̶m̶ ̶b̶a̶s̶i̶s̶ receive less than the total applicable minimum compensation, as set forth in this Basic Agreement, to which he/she would have been entitled had he/she been employed on a freelance basis. At the end of each guaranteed period of employment on a term basis, Company shall compute the aggregate minimum compensation to which the writer would have been entitled under this Basic Agreement had he/she been employed on a freelance basis to write the literary material written by the writer during such period, and shall deduct therefrom the total weekly compensation accruing to the writer during such period, and will promptly pay to the writer the excess, if any.

“Any dispute as to the amount of compensation payable under this subparagraph (e) may be submitted to arbitration, as herein provided. All the provisions of this Basic Agreement, to the extent the same are applicable, shall apply to such term employment, including but not limited to the provisions relating to additional compensation for reruns and theatrical release, and the separation of rights provisions.

“(h) Such writer under a week-to-week employment may write any literary material covered hereunder; provided, however, if such literary material amounts to a rewrite (excluding rewrite(s) of a format, story and/or teleplay written by the writer) or more, such writer shall be paid not less than the minimum freelance compensation for such literary material, computed as of the end of his/her employment or as of the end of each six (6) month period, whichever occurs sooner, in addition to the writer’s weekly compensation. The compensation of a week-to-week writer shall be the compensation per week as set forth in subparagraph (d) above.”

Make conforming changes as needed.

9. Compensation Tier for Writers Also Employed in Additional Capacities (Other than Story Editors or Executive Story Editors) (WGA Proposal No. Proposal 7A)

Modify Article 14.K.1. to provide for a new, higher compensation tier for writers also employed in additional capacities (other than story editors or executive story editors), as follows (contract language is in quotes; new text is underlined; deletions are lined through):

ARTICLE 14 – WRITERS ALSO EMPLOYED IN ADDITIONAL CAPACITIES (TELEVISION)

, Rathergood TV

Ryan Faughnder, senior editor

“WRITERS ALSO EMPLOYED IN ADDITIONAL CAPACITIES”

Writers often also hold other roles on television shows, including as producers. Writer-producers are paid at higher rates than their non-producing counterparts under the union’s contract.

The writer-producer role is also important later in this document when it comes to understanding the guild’s minimum staffing requirements.

Click here to jump to the next annotation.

“K. MINIMUM COMPENSATION

1. The minimum compensation for week-to-week and term employment for writers also employed in additional capacities shall be the following:

“a. For writing services by a writer also employed in additional capacities (other than a story editor or executive story editor) performed in connection with new seasons of a series or serial or for a multi-part, closed-end series, starting on or after [the first Sunday that is 60 days following the AMPTP’s receipt of notice of ratification] (other than dramatic children’s programming):https://javascript:;/

“b. For employment as a story editor/executive story editor, for all employment on dramatic children’s programming and for writing services by a writer also employed in additional capacities performed in connection with seasons of a series or serial or for a multi-part, closed-end series starting prior to [the first Sunday that is 60 days following the AMPTP’s receipt of notice of ratification]:https://javascript:;/

, Rathergood TV

Ryan Faughnder, senior editor

“Rate per week”

These rates probably sound like a lot of money, but remember, if you’re a working television writer who’s not famous, you have to behave as if you may not have a job for months at a time.

“The Company may employ a writer on a guaranteed episode basis. When such writer’s initial guarantee is at least five (5) episodes, the minimums provided in Article 14.K.1.a.(2) or (3), or Article 14.K.1.b.(2) or (3), as applicable, shall apply to such initial guarantee based on the number of weeks such writer actually works.”

Make conforming changes as needed, including the following revision to the second sentence of Article 14.A.: “For the purposes of this Article 14, a person employed as a writer (as defined in Article 1.C.1.a. of this Basic Agreement) and also as an executive producer, producer, associate producer or story editor/executive story editor (as such terms are customarily used and understood in the television industry) is referred to as a ‘writer also employed in additional capacities,’ or ‘such person’ or ‘such writer.’”

10. Development Rooms (WGA Proposal Nos. 8-A, 8-B, 9)

, Rathergood TV

Ryan Faughnder, senior editor

“Development Rooms”

In television, a writers room is group of writers who work on a series. Pop culture often represents a writers room as a group of six to a dozen people gathered around a table in a dull conference room eating pizza, shooting the breeze and bouncing jokes off each other like in “30 Rock.” And sometimes it can be like that, but it’s often more structured and there are weird hierarchies involved. “Ted Lasso” creator Bill Lawrence explained how it works: See the video.

, Rathergood TV

Meg James, senior writer

Consider it in this context: Writers sought rules and minimum pay when hired to develop story arcs, characters and plot points for a potential TV series. The WGA felt the previous set-up allowed abuse because some writers were tied up on a project for weeks and came away with little to show for it. Often, shows were never picked up. In other cases, writers were expected to put in long hours developing a show before the production began, so they had little connection with the rest of the creative process.

Add new Articles 13.B.7.t. and 14.L. to provide for premiums and minimum terms for development rooms, as follows (contract language is in quotes; new text is underlined; deletions are lined through):

ARTICLE 13 – COMPENSATION

B. TELEVISION

“7. Schedule of Minimum Compensation

“s. Week-to-Week and Term Employment

“t. The terms and conditions of this Article 13.B.7.t. apply only to a writer engaged under Article 13.B.7.s. on a week-to-week or term basis with a guarantee of fewer than twenty (20) weeks under a contract with the Company entered into on or after [the 1st of the month immediately following the date the AMPTP receives notice of ratification] for employment in a development room. A ‘development room’ is a room consisting of at least three (3) writers (a team is deemed to be one (1) writer) which is convened before the Company has made or obtained a firm commitment for the production, exhibition or distribution on television or a subscription consumer pay new media platform of a season of a series or serial or for a multi-part, closed-end series.

, Rathergood TV

Ryan Faughnder, senior editor

“at least three (3) writers”

You might have heard about the horrors of “mini-rooms” from writers during the course of the strike. Writers have been saying that the studios’ reliance on more shows and shorter seasons has turned screenwriting into a “gig economy” job, rather than a career. This minimum employment language is meant to address those concerns.

“(1) The minimum guarantee of employment in the development room shall be ten (10) consecutive weeks. If a Company guarantees a writer more than ten (10) weeks of employment, only the first ten (10) weeks need be consecutive.

“(2) Compensation for week-to-week employment or term employment up to and including nineteen (19) weeks in a development room shall be as follows:https://javascript:;/

“ARTICLE 14 – WRITERS ALSO EMPLOYED IN ADDITIONAL CAPACITIES (TELEVISION)

“L. DEVELOPMENT ROOM

1. A ‘development room’ is a room consisting of at least three (3) writers (a team is deemed to be one (1) writer) which is convened before the Company has made or obtained a firm commitment for the production, exhibition or distribution on television or a subscription consumer pay new media platform of a season of a series or serial or for a multi-part, closed-end series.

“2. In addition to the head writer or writer designated by the Company to make hiring decisions or recommendations (hereinafter referred to as the ‘Showrunner’), the Company shall engage at least two (2) writers also employed in additional capacities under Article 14.K. (other than story editors/executive story editors) in a development room.

, Rathergood TV

Meg James, senior writer

“Showrunner”

In television, the most important person on set is the head writer, known as the showrunner.

, Rathergood TV

Brian Contreras, staff writer

If you know a TV writer by name, odds are they’re a showrunner. Think Shonda Rhimes (“Scandal”), Aaron Sorkin (“The West Wing”), Mike Schur (“Parks and Recreation”) or Ryan Murphy (“American Horror Story”).

Read more about the role in this story from my colleague Yvonne Villarreal: “The writers behind your favorite TV shows explain how they made them”

Click here to jump to the next annotation.

“The Showrunner shall be responsible for the selection of such writers; however, the Showrunner’s selection shall be subject to the Company’s approval.

“In the event a writer engaged under the minimum staffing requirements of this Paragraph 14.L.2. voluntarily resigns prior to completion of the writer’s guarantee, the Company must replace the resigning writer unless two (2) or fewer weeks remain on the resigning writer’s guarantee. The Company shall endeavor to replace the resigning writer within (2) weeks. The replacement writer shall be guaranteed the number of weeks remaining on the resigning writer’s guarantee, less the number of weeks intervening between the resigning writer’s last day of employment and the replacement writer’s first day of employment, but not to exceed two (2) weeks.

“The foregoing applies only to a season of a series or serial for which the literary material for the first episode of the season is written on or after [insert date that is the first day of the month occurring at least thirty (30) days following the AMPTP’s receipt of notice of ratification].

“This Paragraph L.2. does not apply to a development room in which all writers are guaranteed at least twenty (20) weeks of employment. Instead, the provisions of Article 14.M. for a series, serial or multi-part, closed-end series shall apply based on an order of six (6) or fewer episodes for the season or six (6) or fewer parts, except that a development room for the second or subsequent season of a series or serial shall apply the provisions of Article 14.M. based on the anticipated number of episodes ordered for the season.

“3. The following terms and conditions apply only to writers also employed in additional capacities under Article 14 on a week-to-week or term basis with a guarantee of fewer than twenty (20) weeks under a contract with the Company entered into on or after [the 1st of the month immediately following the date the AMPTP receives notice of ratification] for employment in a development room:

“a. The minimum guarantee of employment in the development room shall be ten (10) consecutive weeks. If a Company guarantees a writer more than ten (10) weeks of employment, only the first ten (10) weeks need be consecutive.

, Rathergood TV

Meg James, senior writer

“ten (10) consecutive weeks”

Streaming companies, unlike linear networks, can attract new subscribers with buzzy original shows that can be binge-watched over a weekend or two. So TV series orders are much shorter — from six to 13 episodes — than in years past. Broadcast TV networks typically order 22 episodes of a scripted series to run each week over several months, and writers for those traditional TV shows would be employed for much of the year and could enjoy an upper-middle-class lifestyle, particularly if their show ran multiple seasons.

But the shorter series orders have dramatically reduced the number of weeks that writers are hired to work, and also reduced the compensation they receive.

The WGA entered into the negotiations with a goal of ensuring that there would be enough work for writers as the industry quickly moves to a streaming-based economy.

“b. Compensation for week-to-week employment or term employment up to and including nineteen (19) weeks in a development room shall be as follows:https://javascript:;/

, Rathergood TV

Meg James, senior writer

“Rate per week”

In television, writers receive fairly generous weekly minimum pay rates but they typically are not employed 52 weeks a year. One of the goals of the WGA heading into the strike was to preserve the TV and screenwriting profession by getting more writers employed and for longer stretches.

“Compensation paid to a writer employed under subparagraph 3.b. above may not be credited against any compensation due in the event that the writer is subsequently employed to work on the series or serial or a multi-part, closed-end series. The preceding sentence shall not apply to a writer employed on an overall term deal under Article 14.E.2.

“This subparagraph 3. does not apply to a ‘series’ described in Article 14.J. (i.e., a one-time program, including but not limited to a movie-of-the-week, or development deals for specific television programs).”

Make conforming changes as needed.

11. Minimum Staffing Requirements for Writers After a Season Order or Series Order (WGA Proposal No. 9-B, 9-D)

Add new Articles 14.M. and Article 13.B.7.s.(4) to provide for a minimum number of writers after a season or series order, as follows (contract language is in quotes; new text is underlined; deletions are lined through):

, Rathergood TV

Ryan Faughnder, senior editor

“a minimum number of writers”

Don’t sleep on this one! Minimum staffing was one of the writers’ biggest asks going into contract negotiations. Very few people thought they would actually get that guarantee from the studios. For months, studio sources called it a non-starter. Achieving this deal point is a big win for the WGA.

, Rathergood TV

Meg James, senior writer

Matthew Weiner, creator of “Mad Men,” said his series, which was created for cable channel AMC and ran for seven seasons, averaged 10 writers.

“I could never have done that show by myself,” Weiner told us in August while picketing outside Netflix in Hollywood. “I definitely couldn’t have written that many scripts or come up with that much story. There’s not a show in history that you liked that didn’t have a writers room … ‘Star Trek’ … ‘[I Love] Lucy’… ‘The Twilight Zone.’”

, Rathergood TV

Wendy Lee, staff writer

For a look at concerns about how staffing affects diversity, check out my colleague Jevon Phillips’ piece “Striking Black screenwriters fear the job market will shrink.”

“ARTICLE 13 – COMPENSATION

B. TELEVISION

“7. Schedule of Minimum Compensation

“s. Week-to-Week and Term Employment

“(4) See Article 14.M. for guarantees applicable to a writer selected by a Showrunner and engaged by the Company to fulfill staffing requirements on a series, serial or multi-part, closed-end series.”

“ARTICLE 14 – WRITERS ALSO EMPLOYED IN ADDITIONAL CAPACITIES (TELEVISION)

M. STAFFING

, Rathergood TV

Ryan Faughnder, senior editor

“STAFFING”

TL;DR version:

For shows with:
– up to six episodes, three writer-producers must be hired, including the showrunner.
– seven to 12 episodes, five writers must be employed, including the three writer-producers.
– 13 or more episodes, six writers must be hired.

Click here to jump to the next annotation.

“For a series, serial or multi-part, closed-end series for which the order is six (6) or fewer episodes for the season or six (6) or fewer parts, as applicable, Company shall engage a Showrunner (as defined in Article 14.L. above) and at least two (2) writers also employed in additional capacities under Article 14.K. (other than story editors/executive story editors) in the writers’ room.

If the order is for more than six (6) episodes for the season or parts, as applicable, but fewer than thirteen (13), the Company shall also engage two additional writers of any level (i.e., any writers also employed in additional capacities under Article 14.K. or writers employed under Article 13.B.7.s.), for a total of five (5) writers, including the Showrunner.

If the order is for thirteen (13) or more episodes for the season or parts, as applicable, the Company shall also engage three (3) additional writers of any level, for a total of six (6) writers, including the Showrunner.

“Each of those writers shall be engaged for a period of at least twenty (20) weeks, but not to exceed the duration of the writers’ room. If the writers’ room is convened following the close of a development room for the same project, then at least two (2) writers also employed in additional capacities under Article 14.K. (other than story editors/executive story editors) must be writers who were employed in the development room, if available, and the twenty (20) week period of employment referenced in the preceding sentence may include weeks in which the writer was employed in the development room.

“The Showrunner shall be responsible for the selection of such writers; however, the Showrunner’s selection shall be subject to the Company’s approval.

“No payment is owed for any week in which the writer does not perform any services for the Company between the close of the development room and the commencement of such writer’s services in the writers’ room, or during a hiatus or when the writer is voluntarily absent for personal or professional reasons.

“In no event shall the span provisions of Article 14.K.2. include any period before the commencement of such writer’s services in the writers’ room.

“In the event a writer engaged under the minimum staffing requirements of this Paragraph M. voluntarily resigns prior to completion of the writer’s guarantee, the Company must replace the resigning writer unless two (2) or fewer weeks remain on the resigning writer’s guarantee. The Company shall endeavor to replace the resigning writer within (2) weeks. The replacement writer shall be guaranteed the number of weeks remaining on the resigning writer’s guarantee, less the number of weeks intervening between the resigning writer’s last day of employment and the replacement writer’s first day of employment, but not to exceed two (2) weeks.

“This Paragraph M. is effective for any season of a series or serial for which the literary material for the first episode of the season is written on or after [insert date that is the first day of the month thirty (30) days following the AMPTP’s receipt of notice of ratification].

“This Paragraph M. does not apply when a single writer or team of writers is employed to write all episodes.”

, Rathergood TV

Ryan Faughnder, senior editor

“Paragraph M. does not apply when …”

This carve-out allows for showrunners to write every episode alone if they’re hired to do so (call it the “Mike White rule.” Eh, “White Lotus” fans?). But although people who write full seasons by themselves get a lot of attention, there aren’t very many of them.

This is an important compromise. Studios want to be able to hire auteurs to work solo if they want, and this practice can result in high-quality fare. But most shows don’t work that way. Some shows that audiences think of as being driven by singular creators (Jesse Armstrong of “Succession,” for example) do, in fact, have writers rooms.

, Rathergood TV

Wendy Lee, staff writer

According to studio executives, some writer-producers indicated that they wanted more flexibility to determine their own staffing needs. Meg and I touched on that in this August article: “Why the studios were motivated to return to the table”

, Rathergood TV

Ryan Faughnder, senior editor

Yeah! One example: Taylor Sheridan, the prolific creator of “Yellowstone,” “1883” and “1923,” ruffled feathers within the WGA when he questioned the wisdom of the guild’s minimum staffing demands in an interview with the Hollywood Reporter.

“The freedom of the artist to create must be unfettered,” Sheridan said. “If they tell me, ‘You’re going to have to write a check for $540,000 to four people to sit in a room that you never have to meet,’ then that’s between the studio and the guild. But if I have to check in creatively with others for a story I’ve wholly built in my brain, that would probably be the end of me telling TV stories.”

Click here to jump to the next annotation.

Make conforming changes as needed.

12. Minimum Number of Writers to Be Employed Through Production on High Budget SVOD Programs and Dramatic Programs of a Type Generally Produced for Prime Time Network Television which are Produced Principally for Pay Television (WGA Proposal No. 9-D)

Add a new Paragraph 4.d.(5) to the Sideletter on Literary Material Written for Programs Made for New Media, and a new subparagraph D.1.c. to Appendix B, to provide for a minimum number of writers employed through production, as follows (contract language is in quotes; new text is underlined; deletions are lined through):

“SIDELETTER ON LITERARY MATERIAL WRITTEN FOR PROGRAMS MADE FOR NEW MEDIA

“4. Terms and Conditions for “High Budget” Derivative and Original Dramatic New Media Productions Made for Initial Exhibition on a Subscription Consumer Pay Platform

“d. Other Terms and Conditions for High Budget SVOD Programs

“Except as otherwise provided herein, the terms and conditions applicable to High Budget SVOD Programs in Tier 1 intended for initial exhibition on a subscription consumer pay new media platform with 20 million or more subscribers in the United States and Canada shall be those applicable to programs made for network prime time, and the terms and conditions applicable to all other High Budget SVOD Programs shall be those applicable to programs made for basic cable, subject to the following clarifications and modifications:

“(5) Notwithstanding any other provision of the MBA:

“Following the closure of the writers’ room for a single-camera High Budget SVOD series or serial (including multi-part, closed-end series, but excluding ‘series’ described in Article 14.J. of the MBA (i.e., a one time program, including but not limited to a movie-of-the-week, or development deals for specific television programs)) prior to the commencement of production, the Company shall engage a Showrunner (as defined in Article 14.L.) and at least two (2) writers who were employed pursuant to Article 14 (other than story editors/executive story editors) in the writers’ room of that series or serial to render services on production when production of the series or serial will occur exclusively within the United States and/or Canada, as follows:

, Rathergood TV

Meg James, senior writer

“to render services on production”

Under the streaming model, writers have often finished their scripts long before the show went into production, and they have not been kept on staff throughout the filming. Missing out on the production period means missing out on valuable experience, the WGA said.

The union — and traditional studio executives — decided that these short-term savings weren’t in the industry’s best interest.

“I have always been in writers rooms and benefited from the multiple points of view,” veteran showrunner Becky Hartman Edwards told us in late August. “Coming up through the ’90s, the 2000s, I got sent to the set, where I made horrible mistakes at first — but that’s how I learned…. Now, when I’m producing pilots or writing pilots, I have my eye toward production. I’m not going to write impossible-to-produce scenes.”

Younger writers are missing out because they are not going on set to gain that valuable experience, “and they are the creators of the future,” Hartman Edwards said.


Click here to jump to the next annotation.

“(a) The Showrunner shall select two (2) such writers, each of whom shall be employed for a period of at least twenty (20) consecutive weeks during production of the series or serial, but not to exceed the production period. Production includes the period prior to wrap of principal photography and may include pre-production. The Showrunner’s selection shall be subject to the Company’s approval, and the Showrunner shall have discretion as to the dates during which each writer shall be assigned. (The Company may, but shall not be required to, employ one or more of the writers for more than twenty (20) weeks.) To the extent practicable, the Company shall accommodate the writer’s professional availability in scheduling the writer’s production assignment.14

“(b) Each writer so selected shall be paid at no less than the minimum weekly rate in Article 14.K.1.a.(3) or Article 14.K.1.b.(3), as applicable, for term employment twenty (20) weeks or over. No payment is owed for any week in which the writer does not perform any services for the Company, including during any break between the close of the writers’ room and the commencement of services on production, during a hiatus or when the writer is voluntarily absent for personal or professional reasons.

“In the event a writer engaged under the minimum staffing requirements of this subparagraph 4.d.(5) voluntarily resigns prior to completion of the writer’s guarantee, the Company must replace the resigning writer unless two (2) or fewer weeks remain on the resigning writer’s guarantee. The Company shall endeavor to replace the resigning writer within (2) weeks. The replacement writer shall be guaranteed the number of weeks remaining on the resigning writer’s guarantee, less the number of weeks intervening between the resigning writer’s last day of employment and the replacement writer’s first day of employment, but not to exceed two (2) weeks.

“(c) The provisions of Article 14.K.2. (the span provision) and Article 14.I. (hiatus periods) shall not apply to employment under this subparagraph 4.d.(5).

14 At the Showrunner’s option, in order to afford greater participation of multiple writers in production or to allow writers of particular episodes to participate in the production of that episode, the minimum staffing requirement during the production period may be satisfied for each writer position required as part of minimum staffing by the employment of multiple writers during production for a combined total number of weeks that is at least 20 weeks or the duration of production, whichever is less, per minimum position.

Example 1: To satisfy the minimum staffing requirement for the two required writer positions during production, and assuming a 30-week production period, the Company may employ Writer X for 10 weeks, Writer Y for 5 weeks, and Writer Z for 5 weeks, and Writer A for 10 weeks and Writer B for 10 weeks.

Example 2: To satisfy the minimum staffing requirement for the two required writer positions during production, and assuming a 16-week production period, the Company may employ Writer X for 10 Weeks, Writer Y for 6 weeks, and Writer A for 16 weeks.

“(d) The foregoing shall not apply to any High Budget SVOD series or serial for which a single writer or team of writers is engaged to write all episodes for the season.

“(e) This subparagraph 4.d.(5) is effective for any season of a High Budget SVOD series or serial for which the literary material for the first episode of the season is written on or after [insert date that is the first of the month occurring at least thirty (30) days following the AMPTP’s receipt of notice of ratification].”

“APPENDIX B

“PRODUCTION FOR THE PAY TELEVISION AND THE VIDEODISC/VIDEOCASSETTE MARKETS

“D. Compensation for Comedy-Variety Programs and Compensation and Staffing for Dramatic Programs of a Type Generally Produced for Prime Time Network Television which are Produced Principally for Pay Television a̶n̶d̶ ̶C̶o̶m̶e̶d̶y̶ ̶V̶a̶r̶i̶e̶t̶y̶ ̶P̶r̶o̶g̶r̶a̶m̶s̶

, Rathergood TV

Ryan Faughnder, senior editor

“Comedy-Variety Programs”

Good time to remind everyone that the WGA represents several types of writers, including people who do late-night and quiz shows, in addition to episodic television programs.

If you’re curious about which entertainment workers belong to which unions, check out this breakdown: “Roll the credits”

Click here to jump to the next annotation.

“4. Staffing on Production for Dramatic Programs of a Type Generally Produced for Prime Time Network Television which are Produced Principally for Pay Television

“Notwithstanding any other provision of the MBA:

“Following the closure of the writers’ room for a single-camera series or serial produced principally for pay television (including multi-part, closed end series, but excluding ‘series’ described in Article 14.J. of the MBA (i.e., a one-time program, including but not limited to a movie-of-the-week, or development deals for specific television programs) prior to the commencement of production, Company shall engage a Showrunner (as defined in Article 14.L.) and at least two (2) writers who were employed under Article 14.K. (other than story editors/executive story editors) in the writers’ room of that series or serial to render services on production when production of the series or serial will occur exclusively within the United States and/or Canada, as follows:

“a. The Showrunner shall select two (2) such writers, each of whom shall be employed for a period of at least twenty (20) consecutive weeks during production of the series or serial, but not to exceed the production period. Production includes the period prior to wrap of principal photography and may include pre-production. The Showrunner’s selection shall be subject to the Company’s approval, and the Showrunner shall have discretion as to the dates during which each writer shall be assigned. (The Company may, but shall not be required to, employ one or more of the writers for more than twenty (20) weeks. To the extent practicable, the Company shall accommodate the writer’s professional availability in scheduling the writer’s production assignment.15

“b. Each writer so selected shall be paid at the minimum weekly rate in Article 14.K.1.a.(3) or Article 14.K.1.b.(3), as applicable, for term employment twenty (20) weeks or over. No payment is owed for any week in which the writer does not perform any services for the Company, including during any break between the close of the writers’ room and the commencement of services on production, during a hiatus or when the writer is voluntarily absent for personal or professional reasons.

“c. In the event a writer engaged under the minimum staffing requirements of this subparagraph D.4. voluntarily resigns prior to completion of the writer’s guarantee, the Company must replace the resigning writer unless two (2) or fewer weeks remain on the resigning writer’s guarantee. The Company shall endeavor to replace the resigning writer within (2) weeks. The replacement writer shall be guaranteed the number of weeks remaining on the resigning writer’s guarantee, less the number of weeks intervening between the resigning writer’s last day of employment and the replacement writer’s first day of employment, but not to exceed two (2) weeks.

“d. The provisions of Article 14.K.2 (the span provision) and Article 14.I. (hiatus periods) shall not apply to employment under this Paragraph D.4.

15 At the Showrunner’s option, in order to afford greater participation of multiple writers in production or to allow writers of particular episodes to participate in the production of that episode, the minimum staffing requirement during the production period may be satisfied for each writer position required as part of minimum staffing by the employment of multiple writers during production for a combined total number of weeks that is at least 20 weeks or the duration of production, whichever is less, per minimum position.

Example 1: To satisfy the minimum staffing requirement for the two required writer positions during production, and assuming a 30-week production period, the Company may employ Writer X for 10 weeks, Writer Y for 5 weeks, and Writer Z for 5 weeks, and Writer A for 10 weeks and Writer B for 10 weeks.

Example 2: To satisfy the minimum staffing requirement for the two required writer positions during production, and assuming a 16-week production period, the Company may employ Writer X for 10 Weeks, Writer Y for 6 weeks, and Writer A for 16 weeks.

“e. The foregoing shall not apply to any series or serial for which a single writer or team of writers is engaged to write all episodes for the season.

“f. This subparagraph D.4. is effective for any season of a series or serial for which the literary material for the first episode of the season is written on or after [insert date that is the first of the month occurring at least thirty (30) days following the AMPTP’s receipt of notice of ratification].”

Make conforming changes as needed.

13. Span (WGA Proposal No. 10-C)

, Rathergood TV

Meg James, senior writer

“Span”

“Span” refers to a protection for qualifying writers who are paid by the episode. This provision prevents the per-episode fee from being spread over too many weeks.

Click here to jump to the next annotation.

Modify Article 14.K.2. as follows:

“2. With respect to contracts entered into on or after May 2, 2018, the overall employment period covered by the episodic guarantee for each writer employed on a guaranteed episode basis (including an “all episodes produced” guarantee) under this Article 14.K., other than a writer employed as a story editor or other contractually equivalent title, on a dramatic episodic series or serial made for television, or a High Budget SVOD series or serial, for which the full season order (including the pilot) is fourteen (14) or fewer episodes (or twelve (12) or fewer episodes for broadcast television), shall not exceed a number of weeks equal to two and four-tenths (2.4) multiplied by the number of episodes paid or guaranteed to the writer.

“With respect to contracts entered into on or after [insert date that is the first of the month occurring at least thirty (30) days following the AMPTP’s receipt of notice of ratification] for employment on a multi-part closed-end series, the overall employment period covered by the episodic guarantee for each writer employed on a guaranteed episode basis (including an “all episodes produced” guarantee) under this Article 14.K., other than a writer employed as a story editor or other contractually equivalent title, on a dramatic multi-part closed-end series made for television, or a High Budget SVOD multi-part closed-end series, for which the full order is fourteen (14) or fewer parts (or twelve (12) or fewer parts for broadcast television), shall not exceed a number of weeks equal to two and four-tenths (2.4) multiplied by the number of parts paid or guaranteed to the writer.

“The writer shall be paid an additional episodic fee for each additional period worked of two and four-tenths (2.4) weeks, prorated for any period less than two and four-tenths (2.4) weeks, in excess of the overall employment period covered by the episodic guarantee. In no event shall the writer be paid less than the applicable Article 14.K. minimum for each week worked in the entire employment period.

“The overall employment period shall not include any weeks during which a writer’s employment is suspended pursuant to Article 26 or any weeks not worked by the writer during a hiatus.

“The foregoing shall not apply to: (1) any writer who receives at least $̶3̶5̶0̶,̶0̶0̶0̶,̶ ̶e̶x̶c̶l̶u̶d̶i̶n̶g̶ ̶s̶c̶r̶i̶p̶t̶ ̶f̶e̶e̶s̶,̶ ̶(̶a̶t̶ ̶l̶e̶a̶s̶t̶ $375,000, excluding script fees, with respect to contracts for employment on programs made for basic cable e̶n̶t̶e̶r̶e̶d̶ ̶i̶n̶t̶o̶ ̶o̶n̶ ̶o̶r̶ ̶a̶f̶t̶e̶r̶ ̶A̶u̶g̶u̶s̶t̶ ̶2̶,̶ ̶2̶0̶2̶0̶ ̶a̶n̶d̶ or at least $400,000, excluding script fees, with respect to contracts for employment on programs other than programs made for basic cable ($450,000 with respect to contracts for employment on programs other than programs made for basic cable entered into on or after A̶u̶g̶u̶s̶t̶ ̶2̶,̶ ̶2̶0̶2̶0̶ [insert date that is the first of the month occurring at least thirty (30) days following the AMPTP’s receipt of notice of ratification]) for the then-current contract year. With respect to contracts entered into on or after May 2, 2021, Company may not make additional payments to the writer for the sole purpose of exempting the writer from eligibility for payments due under this Article 14.K.2.; (2) any writer employed pursuant to Article 14.E.2.; (3) any writer employed on a “series” described in Article 14.J. (i.e., a one-time program, including but not limited to a movie-of-the-week, or development deals for specific television programs); and (4) any writer employed on a multi-part closed-end series under a contract entered into prior to [insert date that is the first of the month occurring at least thirty (30) days following the AMPTP’s receipt of notice of ratification].”

, Rathergood TV

Brian Contreras, staff writer

“at least $375,000”

OK, so let’s put these numbers into context.

In a series of interviews with striking writers that my colleagues Josh Rottenberg and Jessica Gelt conducted near the start of the WGA strike, one 43-year-old writer/producer said she took home $150,000 in a good year, while a two-person writing team said they made a little over $300,000 a year, combined, pre-tax.

In both cases, those rates were before the writers gave their reps — including agents, managers and lawyers — a cut. For the duo, the end result was a yearly writing income in the low to mid-$80,000s. Click here for more information about what writers really make.

Make conforming changes as needed.

14. Initial Compensation Threshold for Overall Deals (WGA Proposal No. 11) Revise Article 14.E.2. as follows:

“E. 1. What Minimum Compensation Covers

All writing services rendered by a writer also employed in additional capacities up to and including rewrites shall be deemed to be compensation by the minimum compensation provided for such writer pursuant to Paragraph K. of this Article 14.

2. “All formats, stories and teleplays written by such writers during their employment as writers also employed in additional capacities shall be separately compensated, without any offset, credit or allocation of any kind against or by any other compensation of any kind due said individual. Notwithstanding the foregoing, with respect to any writer hereunder who is guaranteed compensation of at least o̶n̶e̶ ̶h̶u̶n̶d̶r̶e̶d̶ ̶ ̶t̶h̶o̶u̶s̶a̶n̶d̶ ̶d̶o̶l̶l̶a̶r̶s̶ ̶(̶$̶1̶0̶0̶,̶0̶0̶0̶)̶ two hundred thousand dollars ($200,000) for up to fifty-two (52) weeks of employment for both writing and non-writing services, the Company shall have the right to credit such compensation freely against the compensation which otherwise would be due to said writer for the writing of any literary material during such employment (but not against residuals or the program fees provided for in Paragraph G. below or for non-writing services). In the event of such crediting, the applicable minimum compensation for writing services set forth in Paragraph K. below shall be credited at no less than one hundred ten percent (110%) thereof, and the compensation for the writing of stories and teleplays for non-pilot one-time programs ninety (90) minutes or longer shall be credited at no less than one hundred fifty percent (150%) of the applicable minimum therefor (but this provision shall not be construed to increase the writer’s compensation for any other purpose under this Basic Agreement, such as, but not limited to reruns and theatrical uses). In such event, the base amount upon which the Company shall compute Pension and Health contributions with respect to such employment shall be two hundred seventy-five thousand dollars ($275,000) for contracts entered into on or after May 2, 2018, except that the base amount shall remain at two hundred fifty thousand dollars ($250,000) for writers employed under this Article 14.E.2. and guaranteed compensation of two hundred fifty thousand dollars or less.16 If the period of guaranteed employment is longer than fifty-two (52) weeks, the applicable base amount for computation of contributions referred to above shall be increased proportionately. If the period of guaranteed employment is shorter than fifty-two (52) weeks, the applicable base amount for computation of contributions shall be decreased proportionately. As to contracts in effect on March 1, 1985, the Company may elect to pay pension and health contributions according to the formula set forth above or according to the formula in the 1981 MBA.”

Make conforming changes as needed.

15. Salary Threshold for Options & Exclusivity (Article 67) (WGA Proposal No. 13-A)

Modify the $325,000 threshold in Paragraphs A.1. and B. of Article 67 to $350,000 for contracts entered into on or after May 2, 2024 as follows:

“ARTICLE 67 – OPTIONS AND EXCLUSIVITY (TELEVISION)

“A. Except as provided in subparagraph B. below, the following shall apply to an agreement between a writer and the Company for employment under Article 13.B.7.s. or under Article 14 on an episodic series or serial, which agreement is entered into on or after M̶a̶y̶ ̶2̶,̶ ̶2̶0̶2̶0̶[first Sunday following AMPTP’s receipt of notice of ratification]:

“1. Company may freely bargain with respect to options and exclusivity with any writer (other than a writer of children’s programming) who is guaranteed or who earns at least $̶2̶8̶0̶,̶5̶0̶0̶$325,000 (which amount shall be increased to $̶3̶2̶5̶,̶0̶0̶0̶$350,000 with respect to any such agreement

16 “See Sideletter to Article 14.E.2. – Pension Plan and Health Fund Contributions for Article 14.E.2.writers on page 598.”

entered into on or after May 2, 2̶0̶2̶1̶2024) for the performance of writing services and/or for the performance of services as a writer also employed in additional capacities during the then-current contract year (which shall not exceed twelve (12) months). With respect to a writer of children’s programming, Company may freely bargain with respect to options and exclusivity with a writer who is guaranteed or who earns at least $250,000.

“B. The following shall apply to an agreement entered into on or after August 2, 2020 between a writer and the Company for initial employment of eight (8) consecutive weeks or less to perform writing services under Article 13.B.7.s. and/or to perform services as a writer also employed in additional capacities under Article 14 on an episodic series or serial in a mini-room:

“Company may not negotiate an option with the writer for future services as a writer under Article 13.B.7.s. or under Article 14 on the series or serial, unless the option is for the period of employment immediately following expiration of the initial period of employment.

“The foregoing shall apply only to a writer who is guaranteed or earns less than $̶2̶8̶0̶,̶5̶0̶0̶$325,000 under the agreement on programs other than children’s programs (less than $̶3̶2̶5̶,̶0̶0̶0̶$350,000 under an agreement on programs other than children’s programs entered into on or after May 2, 2̶0̶2̶1̶2024) or a writer who is guaranteed or who earns less than $250,000 under an agreement on children’s programs.”

Make conforming changes as needed.

16. Premiums for Pilots and Back-up Scripts for High Budget SVOD Programs (WGA Proposal No. 22)

, Rathergood TV

Ryan Faughnder, senior editor

“Pilots”

Traditionally, when you’ve got an idea for a television show, you write and produce a pilot — a first episode that basically introduces the setup, the characters and the tone. The show then gets picked up by a network or it doesn’t.

In the streaming/peak TV era, companies have moved further away from the pilot model and do more straight-to-series orders, where they just decide to make a full season from the outset. This is more common when there’s big-name talent attached or if there’s some big franchise involved.

Click here to jump to the next annotation.

Revise Paragraph 4.d.(1) of the Sideletter on Literary Material Written for Programs Made for New Media to provide that the premiums for pilots and back-up scripts apply to High Budget SVOD Programs as follows:

“d. Other Terms and Conditions for High Budget SVOD Programs

“Except as otherwise provided herein, the terms and conditions applicable to High Budget SVOD Programs in Tier 1 intended for initial exhibition on a subscription consumer pay new media platform with 20 million or more subscribers in the United States and Canada shall be those applicable to programs made for network prime time, and the terms and conditions applicable to all other High Budget SVOD Programs shall be those applicable to programs made for basic cable, subject to the following clarifications and modifications:

“(1) Article 13.B.7.r.(3) shall not apply to any High Budget SVOD Program. Article 13.B.7.r.(1) and (2) shall not apply to any High Budget SVOD Program, the literary material for which was written prior to [the first Sunday following the AMPTP’s receipt of notice of ratification].

“(2) Article 14.G. shall not apply to any High Budget SVOD Program.

“(3) Article 20.B.3.e. shall not apply to any High Budget SVOD Program.

“(4) A High Budget SVOD Program between 20 and 35 minutes in length shall be treated as a 30-minute program; a High Budget SVOD Program between 36 and 65 minutes shall be treated as a 60-minute program; a High Budget SVOD Program between 66 and 95 minutes shall be treated as a 90-minute program; and a High Budget SVOD Program 96 minutes or longer shall be treated as a 120-minute program . . . .”

Make conforming changes as needed.

17. Eliminating Grandfathering Provisions of Paragraph 4.a. in Sideletter on Literary Material Written for New Media (WGA Proposal No. 21; Producers’ Proposal 33)

Modify the Sideletter on Literary Material Written for Programs Made for New Media Paragraph 4.a. to eliminate grandfathering for any season of a High Budget SVOD series for which the literary material for the first episode of the season is written on or after the first Sunday following the AMPTP’s receipt of notice of ratification of the new 2023 MBA, as follows (contract language is in quotes; new text is underlined; deletions are lined through):

“4. Terms and Conditions for ‘High Budget’ Derivative and Original Dramatic New Media Productions Made for Initial Exhibition on a Subscription Consumer Pay Platform

“a. Grandfathering

“(1) The terms and conditions set forth in this Paragraph 4 shall not apply to any season of a High Budget SVOD series that continues in production on or after M̶a̶y̶ ̶2̶,̶ ̶2̶0̶2̶0̶ ̶[the first Sunday following the AMPTP’s receipt of notice of ratification] and was grandfathered, and remains grandfathered, pursuant to Paragraph 4.a. of the 2017 Sideletter on Literary Material Written for Programs Made for New Media (i.e., it is subject to the 2014 or 2011 Sideletter on Literary Material Written for Programs Made for New Media, as applicable) and the literary material of the first episode of that season is written prior to [the first Sunday following the AMPTP’s receipt of notice of ratification]. Any season of such series shall continue to be grandfathered if it continues to meet the applicable test in Paragraph 4.a. of the 2017 or 2014 Sideletter and shall not be subject to the 2̶0̶2̶0̶ 2023 Sideletter on Literary Material Written for Programs Made for New Media, except that for episodes of such series written on or after M̶a̶y̶ ̶2̶,̶ ̶2̶0̶2̶0̶ ̶[the first Sunday following the AMPTP’s receipt of notice of ratification] and subject to a bona fide license agreement entered into between May 2, 2014 and May 1, 2017 (i.e., grandfathered under Paragraph 4.a. of the 2017 Sideletter and subject to the 2014 Sideletter on Literary Material Written for Programs Made for New Media):

“(a) the minimum initial compensation rates shall be as set forth in the Attachment to this Sideletter at page *** [increase the rates on page 682 of the 2020 WGA MBA by the negotiated general wage increase];

“(b) the pension and health contribution rates set forth in Article 17 of the 2̶0̶2̶0̶2023 MBA shall apply; and

“(c) the Paid Parental Leave Fund contribution rate set forth in Article 71 of the 2̶0̶2̶0̶2023 MBA shall apply.

, Rathergood TV

“(2) In addition, this Paragraph 4 shall not apply to any p̶r̶o̶g̶r̶a̶m̶ ̶o̶r̶ ̶season of a series budgeted at less than $1,300,000 for a 20-35 minute program or less than $2,500,000 for a 36-65 minute program as of August 2, 2020 that would otherwise qualify as a ‘High Budget SVOD Program’ under the 2020 2023 MBA for which the literary material of the first episode is written prior to [the first Sunday following the AMPTP’s receipt of notice of ratification]. Instead, such season p̶r̶o̶g̶r̶a̶m̶ ̶o̶r̶ ̶s̶e̶r̶i̶e̶s̶ shall be subject to Paragraph 2. if a ‘Derivative New Media Production’ (other than a ‘High Budget SVOD Program’) or Paragraph 3. if an ‘Original New Media Production’ (other than a ‘High Budget SVOD Program’) of the 2̶0̶2̶0̶ 2023 Sideletter on Literary Material Written for Programs Made for New Media, if:

“(a) the literary material for the p̶r̶o̶g̶r̶̶a̶m̶,̶ ̶o̶r̶ ̶f̶o̶r̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶ first episode i̶n̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶c̶a̶s̶e̶ ̶of ̶a̶ ̶ the series,̶ is written prior to August 2, 2020; or

“(b) the literary material for the p̶r̶o̶g̶r̶̶a̶m̶,̶ ̶o̶r̶ ̶f̶o̶r̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶first episode i̶n̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶c̶a̶s̶e̶ ̶of ̶a̶ ̶ the series,̶ is written on or after August 2, 2020 pursuant to a license agreement entered into prior to that date. 4, 5̶ ̶

“̶(̶3̶)̶ ̶E̶x̶c̶e̶p̶t̶ ̶a̶s̶ ̶p̶r̶o̶v̶i̶d̶e̶d̶ ̶o̶t̶h̶e̶r̶w̶i̶s̶e̶ ̶i̶n̶ ̶s̶u̶b̶p̶a̶r̶a̶g̶r̶a̶p̶h̶s̶ ̶(̶1̶)̶ ̶a̶n̶d̶ ̶(̶2̶)̶ ̶a̶b̶o̶v̶e̶:̶ ̶

“̶S̶u̶b̶j̶e̶c̶t̶ ̶t̶o̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶n̶e̶x̶t̶ ̶p̶a̶r̶a̶g̶r̶a̶p̶h̶,̶ ̶a̶n̶y̶ ̶H̶i̶g̶h̶ ̶B̶u̶d̶g̶e̶t̶ ̶S̶V̶O̶D̶ ̶P̶r̶o̶g̶r̶a̶m̶,̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶ ̶l̶i̶t̶e̶r̶a̶r̶y̶ ̶m̶a̶t̶e̶r̶i̶a̶l̶ ̶f̶o̶r̶ ̶w̶h̶i̶c̶h̶ ̶i̶s̶ ̶w̶r̶i̶t̶t̶e̶n̶ ̶o̶n̶ ̶o̶r̶ ̶a̶f̶t̶e̶r̶ ̶M̶a̶y̶ ̶2̶,̶ ̶2̶0̶2̶0̶,̶ ̶p̶u̶r̶s̶u̶a̶n̶t̶ ̶t̶o̶ ̶ ̶a̶ ̶l̶i̶c̶e̶n̶s̶e̶ ̶a̶g̶r̶e̶e̶m̶e̶n̶t̶ ̶e̶n̶t̶e̶r̶e̶d̶ ̶i̶n̶t̶o̶ ̶p̶r̶i̶o̶r̶ ̶t̶o̶ ̶A̶u̶g̶u̶s̶t̶ ̶2̶,̶ ̶2̶0̶2̶0̶,̶6̶,̶ ̶7̶
̶s̶h̶a̶l̶l̶ ̶b̶e̶

4If the licensee orders additional programs or episodes of the series, the literary material for which is written on or after A̶u̶g̶u̶s̶t̶ ̶2̶,̶ ̶2̶0̶2̶0̶ ̶[the first Sunday following the AMPTP’s receipt of notice of ratification], pursuant to a license agreement entered into prior to that date August 2, 2020, and the Company has the right to negotiate with respect to the material terms and conditions of the license for the additional programs or episodes, then the program or episodes of the series shall be subject to the terms of 2̶0̶2̶0̶2023 Sideletter on Literary Material Written for Programs Made for New Media.

5̶ ̶T̶h̶e̶ ̶C̶o̶m̶p̶a̶n̶y̶ ̶s̶h̶a̶l̶l̶ ̶n̶o̶t̶i̶f̶y̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶G̶u̶i̶l̶d̶ ̶o̶f̶ ̶a̶n̶y̶ ̶s̶u̶c̶h̶ ̶l̶i̶c̶e̶n̶s̶e̶ ̶a̶g̶r̶e̶e̶m̶e̶n̶t̶ ̶t̶h̶a̶t̶ ̶i̶t̶ ̶e̶n̶t̶e̶r̶s̶ ̶i̶n̶t̶o̶ ̶p̶r̶i̶o̶r̶ ̶t̶o̶ ̶A̶u̶g̶u̶s̶t̶ ̶2̶,̶ ̶2̶0̶2̶0̶.̶ ̶T̶h̶e̶ ̶n̶o̶t̶i̶c̶e̶ ̶s̶h̶a̶l̶l̶ ̶i̶n̶c̶l̶u̶d̶e̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶n̶a̶m̶e̶ ̶o̶f̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶l̶i̶c̶e̶n̶s̶e̶e̶,̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶t̶e̶r̶m̶ ̶o̶f̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶l̶i̶c̶e̶n̶s̶e̶ ̶a̶g̶r̶e̶e̶m̶e̶n̶t̶,̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶l̶i̶c̶e̶n̶s̶e̶ ̶f̶e̶e̶,̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶n̶u̶m̶b̶e̶r̶ ̶o̶f̶ ̶p̶r̶o̶g̶r̶a̶m̶s̶ ̶o̶r̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶n̶u̶m̶b̶e̶r̶ ̶o̶f̶ ̶m̶i̶n̶u̶t̶e̶s̶ ̶o̶f̶ ̶p̶r̶o̶g̶r̶a̶m̶m̶i̶n̶g̶ ̶t̶o̶ ̶b̶e̶ ̶p̶r̶o̶d̶u̶c̶e̶d̶ ̶u̶n̶d̶e̶r̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶l̶i̶c̶e̶n̶s̶e̶ ̶a̶g̶r̶e̶e̶m̶e̶n̶t̶,̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶a̶n̶t̶i̶c̶i̶p̶a̶t̶e̶d̶ ̶s̶t̶a̶r̶t̶ ̶d̶a̶t̶e̶ ̶o̶f̶ ̶p̶r̶i̶n̶c̶i̶p̶a̶l̶ ̶p̶h̶o̶t̶o̶g̶r̶a̶p̶h̶y̶,̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶a̶n̶t̶i̶c̶i̶p̶a̶t̶e̶d̶ ̶d̶a̶t̶e̶ ̶o̶f̶ ̶d̶e̶l̶i̶v̶e̶r̶y̶ ̶o̶f̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶p̶r̶o̶g̶r̶a̶m̶ ̶o̶r̶ ̶s̶e̶r̶i̶e̶s̶,̶ ̶a̶n̶d̶ ̶w̶h̶e̶t̶h̶e̶r̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶l̶i̶c̶e̶n̶s̶e̶e̶ ̶h̶a̶s̶ ̶a̶n̶ ̶o̶p̶t̶i̶o̶n̶ ̶t̶o̶ ̶o̶r̶d̶e̶r̶ ̶a̶d̶d̶i̶t̶i̶o̶n̶a̶l̶ ̶p̶r̶o̶g̶r̶a̶m̶s̶ ̶o̶r̶ ̶s̶e̶r̶i̶e̶s̶ ̶u̶n̶d̶e̶r̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶l̶i̶c̶e̶n̶s̶e̶ ̶a̶g̶r̶e̶e̶m̶e̶n̶t̶ ̶a̶n̶d̶,̶ ̶i̶f̶ ̶s̶o̶,̶ ̶w̶h̶e̶t̶h̶e̶r̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶m̶a̶t̶e̶r̶i̶a̶l̶ ̶t̶e̶r̶m̶s̶ ̶a̶n̶d̶ ̶c̶o̶n̶d̶i̶t̶i̶o̶n̶s̶ ̶a̶p̶p̶l̶i̶c̶a̶b̶l̶e̶ ̶t̶o̶ ̶s̶u̶c̶h̶ ̶a̶d̶d̶i̶t̶i̶o̶n̶a̶l̶ ̶p̶r̶o̶g̶r̶a̶m̶s̶ ̶o̶r̶ ̶s̶e̶r̶i̶e̶s̶ ̶a̶r̶e̶ ̶f̶i̶x̶e̶d̶ ̶i̶n̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶l̶i̶c̶e̶n̶s̶e̶ ̶a̶g̶r̶e̶e̶m̶e̶n̶t̶ ̶o̶r̶ ̶a̶r̶e̶ ̶s̶u̶b̶j̶e̶c̶t̶ ̶t̶o̶ ̶n̶e̶g̶o̶t̶i̶a̶t̶i̶o̶n̶.̶ ̶A̶t̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶G̶u̶i̶l̶d̶’̶s̶ ̶r̶e̶q̶u̶e̶s̶t̶,̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶C̶o̶m̶p̶a̶n̶y̶ ̶m̶u̶s̶t̶ ̶m̶a̶k̶e̶ ̶a̶n̶ ̶u̶n̶r̶e̶d̶a̶c̶t̶e̶d̶ ̶l̶i̶c̶e̶n̶s̶e̶ ̶a̶g̶r̶e̶e̶m̶e̶n̶t̶ ̶a̶v̶a̶i̶l̶a̶b̶l̶e̶ ̶f̶o̶r̶ ̶i̶n̶s̶p̶e̶c̶t̶i̶o̶n̶ ̶a̶t̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶C̶o̶m̶p̶a̶n̶y̶’̶s̶ ̶o̶f̶f̶i̶c̶e̶ ̶i̶n̶ ̶L̶o̶s̶ ̶A̶n̶g̶e̶l̶e̶s̶ ̶s̶u̶b̶j̶e̶c̶t̶ ̶t̶o̶ ̶a̶ ̶c̶o̶n̶f̶i̶d̶e̶n̶t̶i̶a̶l̶i̶t̶y̶ ̶a̶g̶r̶e̶e̶m̶e̶n̶t̶ ̶e̶q̶u̶i̶v̶a̶l̶e̶n̶t̶ ̶t̶o̶ ̶t̶h̶o̶s̶e̶ ̶g̶o̶v̶e̶r̶n̶i̶n̶g̶ ̶n̶e̶w̶ ̶m̶e̶d̶i̶a̶ ̶l̶i̶c̶e̶n̶s̶e̶ ̶a̶g̶r̶e̶e̶m̶e̶n̶t̶ ̶i̶n̶s̶p̶e̶c̶t̶i̶o̶n̶s̶.̶ ̶ ̶

, Rathergood TV

Ryan Faughnder, senior editor

“T̶h̶e̶ ̶C̶o̶m̶p̶a̶n̶y̶”

This long chunk is just a lot of verbiage from the previous contract that’s being taken out. Let’s move along.

Click here to jump to the next annotation.

 ̶I̶f̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶l̶i̶c̶e̶n̶s̶e̶e̶ ̶o̶r̶d̶e̶r̶s̶ ̶a̶d̶d̶i̶t̶i̶o̶n̶a̶l̶ ̶H̶i̶g̶h̶ ̶B̶u̶d̶g̶e̶t̶ ̶S̶V̶O̶D̶ ̶P̶r̶o̶g̶r̶a̶m̶s̶ ̶o̶r̶ ̶e̶p̶i̶s̶o̶d̶e̶s̶ ̶o̶f̶ ̶a̶ ̶H̶i̶g̶h̶ ̶B̶u̶d̶g̶e̶t̶ ̶S̶V̶O̶D̶ ̶s̶e̶r̶i̶e̶s̶,̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶l̶i̶t̶e̶r̶a̶r̶y̶ ̶m̶a̶t̶e̶r̶i̶a̶l̶ ̶f̶o̶r̶ ̶w̶h̶i̶c̶h̶ ̶i̶s̶ ̶w̶r̶i̶t̶t̶e̶n̶ ̶o̶n̶ ̶o̶r̶ ̶a̶f̶t̶e̶r̶ ̶M̶a̶y̶ ̶2̶,̶ ̶2̶0̶2̶0̶,̶ ̶p̶u̶r̶s̶u̶a̶n̶t̶ ̶t̶o̶ ̶a̶ ̶l̶i̶c̶e̶n̶s̶e̶ ̶a̶g̶r̶e̶e̶m̶e̶n̶t̶ ̶e̶n̶t̶e̶r̶e̶d̶ ̶i̶n̶t̶o̶ ̶p̶r̶i̶o̶r̶ ̶t̶o̶ ̶A̶u̶g̶u̶s̶t̶ ̶2̶,̶ ̶2̶0̶2̶0̶,̶ ̶a̶n̶d̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶C̶o̶m̶p̶a̶n̶y̶ ̶h̶a̶s̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶r̶i̶g̶h̶t̶ ̶t̶o̶ ̶n̶e̶g̶o̶t̶i̶a̶t̶e̶ ̶w̶i̶t̶h̶ ̶r̶e̶s̶p̶e̶c̶t̶ ̶t̶o̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶m̶a̶t̶e̶r̶i̶a̶l̶ ̶t̶e̶r̶m̶s̶ ̶a̶n̶d̶ ̶c̶o̶n̶d̶i̶t̶i̶o̶n̶s̶ ̶o̶f̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶l̶i̶c̶e̶n̶s̶e̶ ̶f̶o̶r̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶a̶d̶d̶i̶t̶i̶o̶n̶a̶l̶ ̶p̶r̶o̶g̶r̶a̶m̶s̶ ̶o̶r̶ ̶e̶p̶i̶s̶o̶d̶e̶s̶,̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶n̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶H̶i̶g̶h̶ ̶B̶u̶d̶g̶e̶t̶ ̶S̶V̶O̶D̶ ̶P̶r̶o̶g̶r̶a̶m̶ ̶o̶r̶ ̶e̶p̶i̶s̶o̶d̶e̶s̶ ̶o̶f̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶H̶i̶g̶h̶ ̶B̶u̶d̶g̶e̶t̶ ̶S̶V̶O̶D̶ ̶s̶e̶r̶i̶e̶s̶ ̶s̶h̶a̶l̶l̶ ̶b̶e̶ ̶s̶u̶b̶j̶e̶c̶t̶ ̶t̶o̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶t̶e̶r̶m̶s̶ ̶o̶f̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶2̶0̶2̶0̶ ̶S̶i̶d̶e̶l̶e̶t̶t̶e̶r̶ ̶o̶n̶ ̶L̶i̶t̶e̶r̶a̶r̶y̶ ̶M̶a̶t̶e̶r̶i̶a̶l̶ ̶W̶r̶i̶t̶t̶e̶n̶ ̶f̶o̶r̶ ̶P̶r̶o̶g̶r̶a̶m̶s̶ ̶M̶a̶d̶e̶ ̶f̶o̶r̶ ̶N̶e̶w̶ ̶M̶e̶d̶i̶a̶.̶ ̶ ̶

 ̶T̶h̶e̶ ̶C̶o̶m̶p̶a̶n̶y̶ ̶s̶h̶a̶l̶l̶ ̶n̶o̶t̶i̶f̶y̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶G̶u̶i̶l̶d̶ ̶o̶f̶ ̶a̶n̶y̶ ̶s̶u̶c̶h̶ ̶l̶i̶c̶e̶n̶s̶e̶ ̶a̶g̶r̶e̶e̶m̶e̶n̶t̶ ̶t̶h̶a̶t̶ ̶i̶t̶ ̶e̶n̶t̶e̶r̶s̶ ̶i̶n̶t̶o̶ ̶p̶r̶i̶o̶r̶ ̶t̶o̶ ̶A̶u̶g̶u̶s̶t̶ ̶2̶,̶ ̶2̶0̶2̶0̶.̶ ̶T̶h̶e̶ ̶n̶o̶t̶i̶c̶e̶ ̶s̶h̶a̶l̶l̶ ̶i̶n̶c̶l̶u̶d̶e̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶n̶a̶m̶e̶ ̶o̶f̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶l̶i̶c̶e̶n̶s̶e̶e̶,̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶t̶e̶r̶m̶ ̶o̶f̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶l̶i̶c̶e̶n̶s̶e̶ ̶a̶g̶r̶e̶e̶m̶e̶n̶t̶,̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶l̶i̶c̶e̶n̶s̶e̶ ̶f̶e̶e̶,̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶n̶u̶m̶b̶e̶r̶ ̶o̶f̶ ̶p̶r̶o̶g̶r̶a̶m̶s̶ ̶o̶r̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶n̶u̶m̶b̶e̶r̶ ̶o̶f̶ ̶m̶i̶n̶u̶t̶e̶s̶ ̶o̶f̶ ̶p̶r̶o̶g̶r̶a̶m̶m̶i̶n̶g̶ ̶t̶o̶ ̶b̶e̶ ̶p̶r̶o̶d̶u̶c̶e̶d̶ ̶u̶n̶d̶e̶r̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶l̶i̶c̶e̶n̶s̶e̶ ̶a̶g̶r̶e̶e̶m̶e̶n̶t̶,̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶a̶n̶t̶i̶c̶i̶p̶a̶t̶e̶d̶ ̶s̶t̶a̶r̶t̶ ̶d̶a̶t̶e̶ ̶o̶f̶ ̶p̶r̶i̶n̶c̶i̶p̶a̶l̶ ̶p̶h̶o̶t̶o̶g̶r̶a̶p̶h̶y̶,̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶a̶n̶t̶i̶c̶i̶p̶a̶t̶e̶d̶ ̶d̶a̶t̶e̶ ̶o̶f̶ ̶d̶e̶l̶i̶v̶e̶r̶y̶ ̶o̶f̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶p̶r̶o̶g̶r̶a̶m̶ ̶o̶r̶ ̶s̶e̶r̶i̶e̶s̶,̶ ̶a̶n̶d̶ ̶w̶h̶e̶t̶h̶e̶r̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶l̶i̶c̶e̶n̶s̶e̶e̶ ̶h̶a̶s̶ ̶a̶n̶ ̶o̶p̶t̶i̶o̶n̶ ̶t̶o̶ ̶o̶r̶d̶e̶r̶ ̶a̶d̶d̶i̶t̶i̶o̶n̶a̶l̶ ̶p̶r̶o̶g̶r̶a̶m̶s̶ ̶o̶r̶ ̶s̶e̶r̶i̶e̶s̶ ̶u̶n̶d̶e̶r̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶l̶i̶c̶e̶n̶s̶e̶ ̶a̶g̶r̶e̶e̶m̶e̶n̶t̶ ̶a̶n̶d̶,̶ ̶i̶f̶ ̶s̶o̶,̶ ̶w̶h̶e̶t̶h̶e̶r̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶m̶a̶t̶e̶r̶i̶a̶l̶ ̶t̶e̶r̶m̶s̶ ̶a̶n̶d̶ ̶c̶o̶n̶d̶i̶t̶i̶o̶n̶s̶ ̶a̶p̶p̶l̶i̶c̶a̶b̶l̶e̶ ̶t̶o̶ ̶s̶u̶c̶h̶ ̶a̶d̶d̶i̶t̶i̶o̶n̶a̶l̶ ̶p̶r̶o̶g̶r̶a̶m̶s̶ ̶o̶r̶ ̶s̶e̶r̶i̶e̶s̶ ̶a̶r̶e̶ ̶f̶i̶x̶e̶d̶ ̶i̶n̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶l̶i̶c̶e̶n̶s̶e̶ ̶a̶g̶r̶e̶e̶m̶e̶n̶t̶ ̶o̶r̶ ̶a̶r̶e̶ ̶s̶u̶b̶j̶e̶c̶t̶ ̶t̶o̶ ̶n̶e̶g̶o̶t̶i̶a̶t̶i̶o̶n̶.̶ ̶A̶t̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶G̶u̶i̶l̶d̶’̶s̶ ̶r̶e̶q̶u̶e̶s̶t̶,̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶C̶o̶m̶p̶a̶n̶y̶ ̶m̶u̶s̶t̶ ̶m̶a̶k̶e̶ ̶a̶n̶ ̶u̶n̶r̶e̶d̶a̶c̶t̶e̶d̶ ̶l̶i̶c̶e̶n̶s̶e̶ ̶a̶g̶r̶e̶e̶m̶e̶n̶t̶ ̶a̶v̶a̶i̶l̶a̶b̶l̶e̶ ̶f̶o̶r̶ ̶i̶n̶s̶p̶e̶c̶t̶i̶o̶n̶ ̶a̶t̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶C̶o̶m̶p̶a̶n̶y̶’̶s̶ ̶o̶f̶f̶i̶c̶e̶ ̶i̶n̶ ̶L̶o̶s̶ ̶A̶n̶g̶e̶l̶e̶s̶ ̶s̶u̶b̶j̶e̶c̶t̶ ̶t̶o̶ ̶a̶ ̶c̶o̶n̶f̶i̶d̶e̶n̶t̶i̶a̶l̶i̶t̶y̶ ̶a̶g̶r̶e̶e̶m̶e̶n̶t̶ ̶e̶q̶u̶i̶v̶a̶l̶e̶n̶t̶ ̶t̶o̶ ̶t̶h̶o̶s̶e̶ ̶g̶o̶v̶e̶r̶n̶i̶n̶g̶ ̶n̶e̶w̶ ̶m̶e̶d̶i̶a̶ ̶l̶i̶c̶e̶n̶s̶e̶ ̶a̶g̶r̶e̶e̶m̶e̶n̶t̶ ̶i̶n̶s̶p̶e̶c̶t̶i̶o̶n̶s̶.̶

s̶u̶b̶j̶e̶c̶t̶ ̶t̶o̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶2̶0̶1̶7̶ ̶S̶i̶d̶e̶l̶e̶t̶t̶e̶r̶ ̶o̶n̶ ̶L̶i̶t̶e̶r̶a̶r̶y̶ ̶M̶a̶t̶e̶r̶i̶a̶l̶ ̶W̶r̶i̶t̶t̶e̶n̶ ̶f̶o̶r̶ ̶P̶r̶o̶g̶r̶a̶m̶s̶ ̶M̶a̶d̶e̶ ̶f̶o̶r̶ ̶N̶e̶w̶ ̶M̶e̶d̶i̶a̶ ̶i̶n̶s̶t̶e̶a̶d̶ ̶o̶f̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶2̶0̶2̶0̶ ̶S̶i̶d̶e̶l̶e̶t̶t̶e̶r̶ ̶o̶n̶ ̶L̶i̶t̶e̶r̶a̶r̶y̶ ̶M̶a̶t̶e̶r̶i̶a̶l̶ ̶W̶r̶i̶t̶t̶e̶n̶ ̶f̶o̶r̶ ̶P̶r̶o̶g̶r̶a̶m̶s̶ ̶M̶a̶d̶e̶ ̶f̶o̶r̶ ̶N̶e̶w̶ ̶M̶e̶d̶i̶a̶,̶ ̶e̶x̶c̶e̶p̶t̶ ̶t̶h̶a̶t̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶m̶i̶n̶i̶m̶u̶m̶ ̶i̶n̶i̶t̶i̶a̶l̶ ̶c̶o̶m̶p̶e̶n̶s̶a̶t̶i̶o̶n̶ ̶r̶a̶t̶e̶s̶,̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶p̶e̶n̶s̶i̶o̶n̶ ̶a̶n̶d̶ ̶h̶e̶a̶l̶t̶h̶ ̶c̶o̶n̶t̶r̶i̶b̶u̶t̶i̶o̶n̶ ̶r̶a̶t̶e̶s̶ ̶a̶n̶d̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶P̶a̶i̶d̶ ̶P̶a̶r̶e̶n̶t̶a̶l̶ ̶L̶e̶a̶v̶e̶ ̶F̶u̶n̶d̶ ̶c̶o̶n̶t̶r̶i̶b̶u̶t̶i̶o̶n̶ ̶r̶a̶t̶e̶ ̶s̶h̶a̶l̶l̶ ̶b̶e̶ ̶a̶s̶ ̶s̶e̶t̶ ̶f̶o̶r̶t̶h̶ ̶i̶n̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶2̶0̶2̶0̶ ̶M̶B̶A̶.̶

“̶T̶h̶e̶r̶e̶ ̶s̶h̶a̶l̶l̶ ̶b̶e̶ ̶n̶o̶ ̶g̶r̶a̶n̶d̶f̶a̶t̶h̶e̶r̶i̶n̶g̶ ̶w̶i̶t̶h̶ ̶r̶e̶s̶p̶e̶c̶t̶ ̶t̶o̶ ̶a̶n̶y̶ ̶n̶e̶w̶ ̶s̶e̶a̶s̶o̶n̶ ̶o̶f̶ ̶a̶ ̶H̶i̶g̶h̶ ̶B̶u̶d̶g̶e̶t̶ ̶S̶V̶O̶D̶ ̶s̶e̶r̶i̶e̶s̶ ̶c̶o̶v̶e̶r̶e̶d̶ ̶u̶n̶d̶e̶r̶ ̶t̶h̶i̶s̶ ̶s̶u̶b̶p̶a̶r̶a̶g̶r̶a̶p̶h̶ ̶4̶.̶a̶.̶(̶3̶)̶ ̶f̶o̶r̶ ̶w̶h̶i̶c̶h̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶p̶r̶i̶n̶c̶i̶p̶a̶l̶ ̶p̶h̶o̶t̶o̶g̶r̶a̶p̶h̶y̶ ̶o̶f̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶f̶i̶r̶s̶t̶ ̶e̶p̶i̶s̶o̶d̶e̶ ̶o̶f̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶n̶e̶w̶ ̶s̶e̶a̶s̶o̶n̶ ̶c̶o̶m̶m̶e̶n̶c̶e̶s̶ ̶o̶n̶ ̶o̶r̶ ̶a̶f̶t̶e̶r̶ ̶M̶a̶y̶ ̶2̶,̶ ̶2̶0̶2̶3̶ ̶J̶u̶l̶y̶ ̶1̶,̶ ̶2̶0̶2̶1̶.̶ ̶A̶l̶l̶ ̶e̶p̶i̶s̶o̶d̶e̶s̶ ̶o̶f̶ ̶t̶h̶a̶t̶ ̶s̶e̶a̶s̶o̶n̶ ̶a̶n̶d̶ ̶a̶n̶y̶ ̶s̶u̶b̶s̶e̶q̶u̶e̶n̶t̶ ̶s̶e̶a̶s̶o̶n̶s̶ ̶o̶f̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶s̶e̶r̶i̶e̶s̶ ̶s̶h̶a̶l̶l̶ ̶b̶e̶ ̶s̶u̶b̶j̶e̶c̶t̶ ̶t̶o̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶t̶e̶r̶m̶s̶ ̶a̶n̶d̶ ̶c̶o̶n̶d̶i̶t̶i̶o̶n̶s̶ ̶(̶i̶n̶c̶l̶u̶d̶i̶n̶g̶ ̶r̶e̶s̶i̶d̶u̶a̶l̶s̶)̶ ̶a̶p̶p̶l̶i̶c̶a̶b̶l̶e̶ ̶a̶t̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶t̶i̶m̶e̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶w̶r̶i̶t̶e̶r̶ ̶i̶s̶ ̶e̶m̶p̶l̶o̶y̶e̶d̶ ̶t̶o̶ ̶p̶r̶o̶v̶i̶d̶e̶ ̶w̶r̶i̶t̶i̶n̶g̶ ̶s̶e̶r̶v̶i̶c̶e̶s̶ ̶a̶n̶d̶/̶o̶r̶ ̶l̶i̶t̶e̶r̶a̶r̶y̶ ̶m̶a̶t̶e̶r̶i̶a̶l̶ ̶i̶s̶ ̶a̶c̶q̶u̶i̶r̶e̶d̶ ̶f̶r̶o̶m̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶w̶r̶i̶t̶e̶r̶.̶ ̶

“̶E̶x̶a̶m̶p̶l̶e̶s̶ ̶o̶f̶ ̶H̶i̶g̶h̶ ̶B̶u̶d̶g̶e̶t̶ ̶S̶V̶O̶D̶ ̶“̶g̶r̶a̶n̶d̶f̶a̶t̶h̶e̶r̶i̶n̶g̶”̶ ̶s̶c̶e̶n̶a̶r̶i̶o̶s̶ ̶a̶r̶e̶ ̶s̶e̶t̶ ̶f̶o̶r̶t̶h̶ ̶b̶e̶l̶o̶w̶.̶

“̶E̶x̶a̶m̶p̶l̶e̶ ̶1̶:̶ ̶

“̶A̶ ̶l̶i̶c̶e̶n̶s̶e̶ ̶f̶o̶r̶ ̶a̶ ̶H̶i̶g̶h̶ ̶B̶u̶d̶g̶e̶t̶ ̶S̶V̶O̶D̶ ̶s̶e̶r̶i̶e̶s̶ ̶i̶s̶ ̶f̶i̶r̶s̶t̶ ̶e̶n̶t̶e̶r̶e̶d̶ ̶i̶n̶t̶o̶ ̶o̶n̶ ̶M̶a̶y̶ ̶2̶,̶ ̶2̶0̶1̶6̶.̶ ̶ ̶

T̶h̶e̶ ̶l̶i̶t̶e̶r̶a̶r̶y̶ ̶m̶a̶t̶e̶r̶i̶a̶l̶ ̶f̶o̶r̶ ̶S̶e̶a̶s̶o̶n̶ ̶1̶ ̶i̶s̶ ̶w̶r̶i̶t̶t̶e̶n̶ ̶b̶e̶t̶w̶e̶e̶n̶ ̶M̶a̶y̶ ̶2̶,̶ ̶2̶0̶1̶6̶ ̶a̶n̶d̶ ̶M̶a̶y̶ ̶1̶,̶ ̶2̶0̶1̶7̶;̶

T̶h̶e̶ ̶l̶i̶t̶e̶r̶a̶r̶y̶ ̶m̶a̶t̶e̶r̶i̶a̶l̶ ̶f̶o̶r̶ ̶S̶e̶a̶s̶o̶n̶ ̶2̶ ̶i̶s̶ ̶w̶r̶i̶t̶t̶e̶n̶ ̶b̶e̶t̶w̶e̶e̶n̶ ̶M̶a̶y̶ ̶ ̶2̶,̶ ̶2̶0̶1̶7̶ ̶a̶n̶d̶ ̶M̶a̶y̶ ̶1̶,̶ ̶2̶0̶1̶8̶;̶ ̶

T̶h̶e̶ ̶l̶i̶t̶e̶r̶a̶r̶y̶ ̶m̶a̶t̶e̶r̶i̶a̶l̶ ̶f̶o̶r̶ ̶S̶e̶a̶s̶o̶n̶ ̶3̶ ̶i̶s̶ ̶w̶r̶i̶t̶t̶e̶n̶ ̶b̶e̶t̶w̶e̶e̶n̶ ̶M̶a̶y̶ ̶ ̶2̶,̶ ̶2̶0̶1̶8̶ ̶a̶n̶d̶ ̶M̶a̶y̶ ̶1̶,̶ ̶2̶0̶1̶9̶;̶ ̶

T̶h̶e̶ ̶l̶i̶t̶e̶r̶a̶r̶y̶ ̶m̶a̶t̶e̶r̶i̶a̶l̶ ̶f̶o̶r̶ ̶S̶e̶a̶s̶o̶n̶ ̶4̶ ̶i̶s̶ ̶w̶r̶i̶t̶t̶e̶n̶ ̶b̶e̶t̶w̶e̶e̶n̶ ̶M̶a̶y̶ ̶2̶,̶ ̶ ̶2̶0̶1̶9̶ ̶a̶n̶d̶ ̶M̶a̶y̶ ̶1̶,̶ ̶2̶0̶2̶0̶;̶ ̶ ̶

T̶h̶e̶ ̶l̶i̶t̶e̶r̶a̶r̶y̶ ̶m̶a̶t̶e̶r̶i̶a̶l̶ ̶f̶o̶r̶ ̶S̶e̶a̶s̶o̶n̶ ̶5̶ ̶i̶s̶ ̶w̶r̶i̶t̶t̶e̶n̶ ̶b̶e̶t̶w̶e̶e̶n̶ ̶M̶a̶y̶ ̶2̶,̶ ̶ ̶2̶0̶2̶0̶ ̶a̶n̶d̶ ̶M̶a̶y̶ ̶1̶,̶ ̶2̶0̶2̶1̶;̶ ̶a̶n̶d̶ ̶ ̶

T̶h̶e̶ ̶l̶i̶t̶e̶r̶a̶r̶y̶ ̶m̶a̶t̶e̶r̶i̶a̶l̶ ̶f̶o̶r̶ ̶S̶e̶a̶s̶o̶n̶ ̶6̶ ̶i̶s̶ ̶w̶r̶i̶t̶t̶e̶n̶ ̶b̶e̶t̶w̶e̶e̶n̶ ̶M̶a̶y̶ ̶2̶,̶ ̶ ̶2̶0̶2̶1̶ ̶a̶n̶d̶ ̶M̶a̶y̶ ̶1̶,̶ ̶2̶0̶2̶2̶ ̶a̶n̶d̶ ̶p̶r̶i̶n̶c̶i̶p̶a̶l̶ ̶p̶h̶o̶t̶o̶g̶r̶a̶p̶h̶y̶ ̶o̶f̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶f̶i̶r̶s̶t̶ ̶ ̶e̶p̶i̶s̶o̶d̶e̶ ̶o̶f̶ ̶S̶e̶a̶s̶o̶n̶ ̶6̶ ̶c̶o̶m̶m̶e̶n̶c̶e̶s̶ ̶a̶f̶t̶e̶r̶ ̶J̶u̶l̶y̶ ̶1̶,̶ ̶2̶0̶2̶1̶.̶ ̶

I̶n̶ ̶t̶h̶i̶s̶ ̶e̶x̶a̶m̶p̶l̶e̶,̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶e̶n̶t̶i̶r̶e̶ ̶s̶e̶r̶i̶e̶s̶ ̶w̶o̶u̶l̶d̶ ̶r̶e̶m̶a̶i̶n̶ ̶g̶r̶a̶n̶d̶f̶a̶t̶h̶e̶r̶e̶d̶ ̶a̶n̶d̶ ̶s̶u̶b̶j̶e̶c̶t̶ ̶ ̶t̶o̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶t̶e̶r̶m̶s̶ ̶o̶f̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶2̶0̶1̶4̶ ̶S̶i̶d̶e̶l̶e̶t̶t̶e̶r̶ ̶o̶n̶ ̶L̶i̶t̶e̶r̶a̶r̶y̶ ̶M̶a̶t̶e̶r̶i̶a̶l̶ ̶W̶r̶i̶t̶t̶e̶n̶ ̶f̶o̶r̶ ̶ ̶P̶r̶o̶g̶r̶a̶m̶s̶ ̶M̶a̶d̶e̶ ̶f̶o̶r̶ ̶N̶e̶w̶ ̶M̶e̶d̶i̶a̶,̶ ̶a̶n̶d̶ ̶n̶o̶t̶ ̶s̶u̶b̶j̶e̶c̶t̶ ̶t̶o̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶2̶0̶2̶0̶ ̶S̶i̶d̶e̶l̶e̶t̶t̶e̶r̶ ̶ ̶o̶n̶ ̶L̶i̶t̶e̶r̶a̶r̶y̶ ̶M̶a̶t̶e̶r̶i̶a̶l̶ ̶W̶r̶i̶t̶t̶e̶n̶ ̶f̶o̶r̶ ̶P̶r̶o̶g̶r̶a̶m̶s̶ ̶M̶a̶d̶e̶ ̶f̶o̶r̶ ̶N̶e̶w̶ ̶M̶e̶d̶i̶a̶,̶ ̶e̶x̶c̶e̶p̶t̶ ̶ ̶t̶h̶a̶t̶ ̶f̶o̶r̶ ̶S̶e̶a̶s̶o̶n̶s̶ ̶5̶ ̶a̶n̶d̶ ̶6̶,̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶m̶i̶n̶i̶m̶u̶m̶ ̶i̶n̶i̶t̶i̶a̶l̶ ̶c̶o̶m̶p̶e̶n̶s̶a̶t̶i̶o̶n̶ ̶r̶a̶t̶e̶s̶ ̶a̶n̶d̶ ̶ ̶f̶r̶i̶n̶g̶e̶ ̶r̶a̶t̶e̶s̶,̶ ̶i̶n̶c̶l̶u̶d̶i̶n̶g̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶c̶o̶n̶t̶r̶i̶b̶u̶t̶i̶o̶n̶ ̶t̶o̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶P̶a̶i̶d̶ ̶P̶a̶r̶e̶n̶t̶a̶l̶ ̶L̶e̶a̶v̶e̶ ̶F̶u̶n̶d̶,̶ ̶ ̶w̶o̶u̶l̶d̶ ̶b̶e̶ ̶a̶s̶ ̶n̶e̶g̶o̶t̶i̶a̶t̶e̶d̶ ̶i̶n̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶2̶0̶2̶0̶ ̶n̶e̶g̶o̶t̶i̶a̶t̶i̶o̶n̶s̶.̶ ̶

E̶x̶a̶m̶p̶l̶e̶ ̶2̶:̶ ̶ ̶

A̶ ̶l̶i̶c̶e̶n̶s̶e̶ ̶f̶o̶r̶ ̶a̶ ̶H̶i̶g̶h̶ ̶B̶u̶d̶g̶e̶t̶ ̶S̶V̶O̶D̶ ̶s̶e̶r̶i̶e̶s̶ ̶i̶s̶ ̶f̶i̶r̶s̶t̶ ̶e̶n̶t̶e̶r̶e̶d̶ ̶i̶n̶t̶o̶ ̶o̶n̶ ̶M̶a̶y̶ ̶2̶,̶ ̶ ̶2̶0̶1̶8̶.̶ ̶ ̶

T̶h̶e̶ ̶l̶i̶t̶e̶r̶a̶r̶y̶ ̶m̶a̶t̶e̶r̶i̶a̶l̶ ̶f̶o̶r̶ ̶S̶e̶a̶s̶o̶n̶ ̶1̶ ̶i̶s̶ ̶w̶r̶i̶t̶t̶e̶n̶ ̶b̶e̶t̶w̶e̶e̶n̶ ̶M̶a̶y̶ ̶2̶,̶ ̶ ̶2̶0̶1̶8̶ ̶a̶n̶d̶ ̶M̶a̶y̶ ̶1̶,̶ ̶2̶0̶1̶9̶;̶ ̶ ̶

T̶h̶e̶ ̶l̶i̶t̶e̶r̶a̶r̶y̶ ̶m̶a̶t̶e̶r̶i̶a̶l̶ ̶f̶o̶r̶ ̶S̶e̶a̶s̶o̶n̶ ̶2̶ ̶i̶s̶ ̶w̶r̶i̶t̶t̶e̶n̶ ̶b̶e̶t̶w̶e̶e̶n̶ ̶M̶a̶y̶ ̶2̶,̶ ̶ ̶2̶0̶1̶9̶ ̶a̶n̶d̶ ̶M̶a̶y̶ ̶1̶,̶ ̶2̶0̶2̶0̶;̶ ̶ ̶ ̶

T̶h̶e̶ ̶l̶i̶t̶e̶r̶a̶r̶y̶ ̶m̶a̶t̶e̶r̶i̶a̶l̶ ̶f̶o̶r̶ ̶S̶e̶a̶s̶o̶n̶ ̶3̶ ̶i̶s̶ ̶w̶r̶i̶t̶t̶e̶n̶ ̶b̶e̶t̶w̶e̶e̶n̶ ̶M̶a̶y̶ ̶2̶,̶ ̶ ̶2̶0̶2̶0̶ ̶a̶n̶d̶ ̶M̶a̶y̶ ̶1̶,̶ ̶2̶0̶2̶1̶;̶ ̶a̶n̶d̶ ̶ ̶

T̶h̶e̶ ̶l̶i̶t̶e̶r̶a̶r̶y̶ ̶m̶a̶t̶e̶r̶i̶a̶l̶ ̶f̶o̶r̶ ̶S̶e̶a̶s̶o̶n̶ ̶4̶ ̶i̶s̶ ̶w̶r̶i̶t̶t̶e̶n̶ ̶b̶e̶t̶w̶e̶e̶n̶ ̶M̶a̶y̶ ̶2̶,̶ ̶ ̶2̶0̶2̶1̶ ̶a̶n̶d̶ ̶M̶a̶y̶ ̶1̶,̶ ̶2̶0̶2̶2̶ ̶a̶n̶d̶ ̶p̶r̶i̶n̶c̶i̶p̶a̶l̶ ̶p̶h̶o̶t̶o̶g̶r̶a̶p̶h̶y̶ ̶o̶f̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶f̶i̶r̶s̶t̶ ̶ ̶e̶p̶i̶s̶o̶d̶e̶ ̶o̶f̶ ̶S̶e̶a̶s̶o̶n̶ ̶4̶ ̶c̶o̶m̶m̶e̶n̶c̶e̶s̶ ̶a̶f̶t̶e̶r̶ ̶J̶u̶l̶y̶ ̶1̶,̶ ̶2̶0̶2̶1̶.̶ ̶

S̶e̶a̶s̶o̶n̶s̶ ̶1̶ ̶a̶n̶d̶ ̶2̶ ̶w̶e̶r̶e̶ ̶w̶r̶i̶t̶t̶e̶n̶ ̶u̶n̶d̶e̶r̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶t̶e̶r̶m̶s̶ ̶o̶f̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶2̶0̶1̶7̶ ̶S̶i̶d̶e̶l̶e̶t̶t̶e̶r̶ ̶o̶n̶ ̶ ̶L̶i̶t̶e̶r̶a̶r̶y̶ ̶M̶a̶t̶e̶r̶i̶a̶l̶ ̶W̶r̶i̶t̶t̶e̶n̶ ̶f̶o̶r̶ ̶P̶r̶o̶g̶r̶a̶m̶s̶ ̶M̶a̶d̶e̶ ̶f̶o̶r̶ ̶N̶e̶w̶ ̶M̶e̶d̶i̶a̶,̶ ̶a̶n̶d̶ ̶t̶h̶o̶s̶e̶ ̶ ̶t̶e̶r̶m̶s̶ ̶w̶o̶u̶l̶d̶ ̶r̶e̶m̶a̶i̶n̶ ̶a̶p̶p̶l̶i̶c̶a̶b̶l̶e̶.̶ ̶ ̶ ̶

S̶e̶a̶s̶o̶n̶ ̶3̶ ̶w̶o̶u̶l̶d̶ ̶b̶e̶ ̶g̶r̶a̶n̶d̶f̶a̶t̶h̶e̶r̶e̶d̶,̶ ̶a̶n̶d̶ ̶w̶o̶u̶l̶d̶ ̶b̶e̶ ̶s̶u̶b̶j̶e̶c̶t̶ ̶t̶o̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶2̶0̶1̶7̶ ̶ ̶S̶i̶d̶e̶l̶e̶t̶t̶e̶r̶ ̶o̶n̶ ̶L̶i̶t̶e̶r̶a̶r̶y̶ ̶M̶a̶t̶e̶r̶i̶a̶l̶ ̶W̶r̶i̶t̶t̶e̶n̶ ̶f̶o̶r̶ ̶P̶r̶o̶g̶r̶a̶m̶s̶ ̶M̶a̶d̶e̶ ̶f̶o̶r̶ ̶N̶e̶w̶ ̶ ̶M̶e̶d̶i̶a̶,̶ ̶e̶x̶c̶e̶p̶t̶ ̶t̶h̶a̶t̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶m̶i̶n̶i̶m̶u̶m̶ ̶i̶n̶i̶t̶i̶a̶l̶ ̶c̶o̶m̶p̶e̶n̶s̶a̶t̶i̶o̶n̶ ̶r̶a̶t̶e̶s̶ ̶a̶n̶d̶ ̶f̶r̶i̶n̶g̶e̶ ̶ ̶r̶a̶t̶e̶s̶,̶ ̶i̶n̶c̶l̶u̶d̶i̶n̶g̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶c̶o̶n̶t̶r̶i̶b̶u̶t̶i̶o̶n̶ ̶t̶o̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶P̶a̶i̶d̶ ̶P̶a̶r̶e̶n̶t̶a̶l̶ ̶L̶e̶a̶v̶e̶ ̶F̶u̶n̶d̶,̶ ̶w̶o̶u̶l̶d̶ ̶ ̶b̶e̶ ̶a̶s̶ ̶n̶e̶g̶o̶t̶i̶a̶t̶e̶d̶ ̶i̶n̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶2̶0̶2̶0̶ ̶n̶e̶g̶o̶t̶i̶a̶t̶i̶o̶n̶s̶.̶ ̶ ̶

S̶e̶a̶s̶o̶n̶ ̶4̶ ̶w̶o̶u̶l̶d̶ ̶n̶o̶t̶ ̶b̶e̶ ̶g̶r̶a̶n̶d̶f̶a̶t̶h̶e̶r̶e̶d̶,̶ ̶a̶n̶d̶ ̶w̶o̶u̶l̶d̶ ̶b̶e̶ ̶s̶u̶b̶j̶e̶c̶t̶ ̶t̶o̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶2̶0̶2̶0̶ ̶ ̶S̶i̶d̶e̶l̶e̶t̶t̶e̶r̶ ̶o̶n̶ ̶L̶i̶t̶e̶r̶a̶r̶y̶ ̶M̶a̶t̶e̶r̶i̶a̶l̶ ̶W̶r̶i̶t̶t̶e̶n̶ ̶f̶o̶r̶ ̶P̶r̶o̶g̶r̶a̶m̶s̶ ̶M̶a̶d̶e̶ ̶f̶o̶r̶ ̶N̶e̶w̶ ̶ ̶M̶e̶d̶i̶a̶.̶ ̶

E̶x̶a̶m̶p̶l̶e̶ ̶3̶:̶ ̶

A̶ ̶l̶i̶c̶e̶n̶s̶e̶ ̶f̶o̶r̶ ̶a̶ ̶H̶i̶g̶h̶ ̶B̶u̶d̶g̶e̶t̶ ̶S̶V̶O̶D̶ ̶s̶e̶r̶i̶e̶s̶ ̶i̶s̶ ̶f̶i̶r̶s̶t̶ ̶e̶n̶t̶e̶r̶e̶d̶ ̶i̶n̶t̶o̶ ̶o̶n̶ ̶M̶a̶y̶ ̶2̶,̶ ̶2̶0̶1̶9̶.̶ ̶ ̶

T̶h̶e̶ ̶l̶i̶t̶e̶r̶a̶r̶y̶ ̶m̶a̶t̶e̶r̶i̶a̶l̶ ̶f̶o̶r̶ ̶S̶e̶a̶s̶o̶n̶ ̶1̶ ̶i̶s̶ ̶w̶r̶i̶t̶t̶e̶n̶ ̶b̶e̶t̶w̶e̶e̶n̶ ̶M̶a̶y̶ ̶2̶,̶ ̶2̶0̶1̶9̶ ̶a̶n̶d̶ ̶M̶a̶y̶ ̶1̶,̶ ̶2̶0̶2̶0̶;̶ ̶ ̶

T̶h̶e̶ ̶l̶i̶t̶e̶r̶a̶r̶y̶ ̶m̶a̶t̶e̶r̶i̶a̶l̶ ̶f̶o̶r̶ ̶S̶e̶a̶s̶o̶n̶ ̶2̶ ̶i̶s̶ ̶w̶r̶i̶t̶t̶e̶n̶ ̶b̶e̶t̶w̶e̶e̶n̶ ̶J̶u̶l̶y̶ ̶2̶,̶ ̶2̶0̶2̶0̶ ̶a̶n̶d̶ ̶M̶a̶y̶ ̶1̶,̶ ̶2̶0̶2̶1̶;̶ ̶a̶n̶d̶ ̶p̶r̶i̶n̶c̶i̶p̶a̶l̶ ̶p̶h̶o̶t̶o̶g̶r̶a̶p̶h̶y̶ ̶o̶f̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶f̶i̶r̶s̶t̶ ̶e̶p̶i̶s̶o̶d̶e̶ ̶o̶f̶ ̶S̶e̶a̶s̶o̶n̶ ̶2̶ ̶c̶o̶m̶m̶e̶n̶c̶e̶s̶ ̶a̶f̶t̶e̶r̶ ̶J̶u̶l̶y̶ ̶1̶,̶ ̶2̶0̶2̶1̶.̶ ̶ ̶

S̶e̶a̶s̶o̶n̶ ̶1̶ ̶w̶a̶s̶ ̶w̶r̶i̶t̶t̶e̶n̶ ̶u̶n̶d̶e̶r̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶t̶e̶r̶m̶s̶ ̶o̶f̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶2̶0̶1̶7̶ ̶S̶i̶d̶e̶l̶e̶t̶t̶e̶r̶ ̶o̶n̶ ̶L̶i̶t̶e̶r̶a̶r̶y̶ ̶M̶a̶t̶e̶r̶i̶a̶l̶ ̶W̶r̶i̶t̶t̶e̶n̶ ̶f̶o̶r̶ ̶P̶r̶o̶g̶r̶a̶m̶s̶ ̶M̶a̶d̶e̶ ̶f̶o̶r̶ ̶N̶e̶w̶ ̶M̶e̶d̶i̶a̶,̶ ̶a̶n̶d̶ ̶t̶h̶o̶s̶e̶ ̶t̶e̶r̶m̶s̶ ̶w̶o̶u̶l̶d̶ ̶r̶e̶m̶a̶i̶n̶ ̶a̶p̶p̶l̶i̶c̶a̶b̶l̶e̶.̶ ̶ ̶

S̶e̶a̶s̶o̶n̶ ̶2̶ ̶w̶o̶u̶l̶d̶ ̶b̶e̶ ̶i̶n̶i̶t̶i̶a̶l̶l̶y̶ ̶t̶r̶e̶a̶t̶e̶d̶ ̶a̶s̶ ̶g̶r̶a̶n̶d̶f̶a̶t̶h̶e̶r̶e̶d̶,̶ ̶s̶u̶b̶j̶e̶c̶t̶ ̶t̶o̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶2̶0̶1̶7̶ ̶S̶i̶d̶e̶l̶e̶t̶t̶e̶r̶ ̶o̶n̶ ̶L̶i̶t̶e̶r̶a̶r̶y̶ ̶M̶a̶t̶e̶r̶i̶a̶l̶ ̶W̶r̶i̶t̶t̶e̶n̶ ̶f̶o̶r̶ ̶P̶r̶o̶g̶r̶a̶m̶s̶ ̶M̶a̶d̶e̶ ̶f̶o̶r̶ ̶N̶e̶w̶ ̶M̶e̶d̶i̶a̶,̶ ̶e̶x̶c̶e̶p̶t̶ ̶t̶h̶a̶t̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶m̶i̶n̶i̶m̶u̶m̶ ̶i̶n̶i̶t̶i̶a̶l̶ ̶c̶o̶m̶p̶e̶n̶s̶a̶t̶i̶o̶n̶ ̶r̶a̶t̶e̶ ̶a̶n̶d̶ ̶f̶r̶i̶n̶g̶e̶ ̶r̶a̶t̶e̶s̶,̶ ̶i̶n̶c̶l̶u̶d̶i̶n̶g̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶c̶o̶n̶t̶r̶i̶b̶u̶t̶i̶o̶n̶ ̶t̶o̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶P̶a̶i̶d̶ ̶P̶a̶r̶e̶n̶t̶a̶l̶ ̶L̶e̶a̶v̶e̶ ̶F̶u̶n̶d̶,̶ ̶w̶o̶u̶l̶d̶ ̶b̶e̶ ̶a̶s̶ ̶n̶e̶g̶o̶t̶i̶a̶t̶e̶d̶ ̶i̶n̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶2̶0̶2̶0̶ ̶n̶e̶g̶o̶t̶i̶a̶t̶i̶o̶n̶s̶;̶ ̶h̶o̶w̶e̶v̶e̶r̶,̶ ̶S̶e̶a̶s̶o̶n̶ ̶2̶ ̶w̶o̶u̶l̶d̶ ̶l̶o̶s̶e̶ ̶g̶r̶a̶n̶d̶f̶a̶t̶h̶e̶r̶e̶d̶ ̶s̶t̶a̶t̶u̶s̶ ̶b̶e̶c̶a̶u̶s̶e̶ ̶p̶r̶i̶n̶c̶i̶p̶a̶l̶ ̶p̶h̶o̶t̶o̶g̶r̶a̶p̶h̶y̶ ̶o̶f̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶f̶i̶r̶s̶t̶ ̶e̶p̶i̶s̶o̶d̶e̶ ̶o̶f̶ ̶S̶e̶a̶s̶o̶n̶ ̶2̶ ̶o̶c̶c̶u̶r̶s̶ ̶a̶f̶t̶e̶r̶ ̶J̶u̶l̶y̶ ̶1̶,̶ ̶2̶0̶2̶1̶,̶ ̶m̶a̶k̶i̶n̶g̶ ̶S̶e̶a̶s̶o̶n̶ ̶2̶ ̶s̶u̶b̶j̶e̶c̶t̶ ̶t̶o̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶2̶0̶2̶0̶ ̶S̶i̶d̶e̶l̶e̶t̶t̶e̶r̶ ̶o̶n̶ ̶L̶i̶t̶e̶r̶a̶r̶y̶ ̶M̶a̶t̶e̶r̶i̶a̶l̶ ̶W̶r̶i̶t̶t̶e̶n̶ ̶f̶o̶r̶ ̶P̶r̶o̶g̶r̶a̶m̶s̶ ̶M̶a̶d̶e̶ ̶f̶o̶r̶ ̶N̶e̶w̶ ̶M̶e̶d̶i̶a̶ ̶f̶o̶r̶ ̶r̶e̶s̶i̶d̶u̶a̶l̶s̶ ̶p̶u̶r̶p̶o̶s̶e̶s̶.̶ ̶(̶T̶h̶e̶ ̶s̶u̶b̶s̶c̶r̶i̶b̶e̶r̶ ̶t̶i̶e̶r̶ ̶t̶h̶a̶t̶ ̶a̶p̶p̶l̶i̶e̶d̶ ̶a̶t̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶t̶i̶m̶e̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶l̶i̶t̶e̶r̶a̶r̶y̶ ̶m̶a̶t̶e̶r̶i̶a̶l̶ ̶f̶o̶r̶ ̶S̶e̶a̶s̶o̶n̶ ̶2̶ ̶w̶a̶s̶ ̶w̶r̶i̶t̶t̶e̶n̶ ̶r̶e̶m̶a̶i̶n̶s̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶a̶p̶p̶l̶i̶c̶a̶b̶l̶e̶ ̶s̶u̶b̶s̶c̶r̶i̶b̶e̶r̶ ̶t̶i̶e̶r̶ ̶f̶o̶r̶ ̶a̶l̶l̶ ̶p̶u̶r̶p̶o̶s̶e̶s̶.̶)̶

E̶x̶a̶m̶p̶l̶e̶ ̶4̶:̶ ̶ ̶

A̶ ̶l̶i̶c̶e̶n̶s̶e̶ ̶f̶o̶r̶ ̶a̶ ̶H̶i̶g̶h̶ ̶B̶u̶d̶g̶e̶t̶ ̶S̶V̶O̶D̶ ̶s̶e̶r̶i̶e̶s̶ ̶i̶s̶ ̶f̶i̶r̶s̶t̶ ̶e̶n̶t̶e̶r̶e̶d̶ ̶i̶n̶t̶o̶ ̶o̶n̶ ̶M̶a̶r̶c̶h̶ ̶1̶,̶ ̶2̶0̶1̶9̶.̶ ̶ ̶

T̶h̶e̶ ̶l̶i̶t̶e̶r̶a̶r̶y̶ ̶m̶a̶t̶e̶r̶i̶a̶l̶ ̶f̶o̶r̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶p̶i̶l̶o̶t̶ ̶i̶s̶ ̶w̶r̶i̶t̶t̶e̶n̶ ̶i̶n̶ ̶J̶a̶n̶u̶a̶r̶y̶ ̶2̶0̶1̶9̶;̶ ̶ ̶T̶h̶e̶ ̶l̶i̶t̶e̶r̶a̶r̶y̶ ̶m̶a̶t̶e̶r̶i̶a̶l̶ ̶f̶o̶r̶ ̶S̶e̶a̶s̶o̶n̶ ̶1̶ ̶i̶s̶ ̶w̶r̶i̶t̶t̶e̶n̶ ̶b̶e̶t̶w̶e̶e̶n̶ ̶M̶a̶r̶c̶h̶ ̶1̶,̶ ̶2̶0̶1̶9̶ ̶a̶n̶d̶ ̶S̶e̶p̶t̶e̶m̶b̶e̶r̶ ̶3̶0̶,̶ ̶2̶0̶2̶0̶;̶ ̶a̶n̶d̶ ̶ ̶

T̶h̶e̶ ̶l̶i̶t̶e̶r̶a̶r̶y̶ ̶m̶a̶t̶e̶r̶i̶a̶l̶ ̶f̶o̶r̶ ̶S̶e̶a̶s̶o̶n̶ ̶2̶ ̶i̶s̶ ̶w̶r̶i̶t̶t̶e̶n̶ ̶b̶e̶t̶w̶e̶e̶n̶ ̶J̶a̶n̶u̶a̶r̶y̶ ̶1̶,̶ ̶2̶0̶2̶1̶ ̶a̶n̶d̶ ̶A̶p̶r̶i̶l̶ ̶3̶0̶,̶ ̶2̶0̶2̶1̶ ̶a̶n̶d̶ ̶p̶r̶i̶n̶c̶i̶p̶a̶l̶ ̶p̶h̶o̶t̶o̶g̶r̶a̶p̶h̶y̶ ̶o̶f̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶f̶i̶r̶s̶t̶ ̶e̶p̶i̶s̶o̶d̶e̶ ̶o̶f̶ ̶S̶e̶a̶s̶o̶n̶ ̶2̶ ̶c̶o̶m̶m̶e̶n̶c̶e̶s̶ ̶a̶f̶t̶e̶r̶ ̶J̶u̶l̶y̶ ̶1̶,̶ ̶2̶0̶2̶1̶;̶ ̶ ̶

T̶h̶e̶ ̶p̶i̶l̶o̶t̶ ̶w̶a̶s̶ ̶w̶r̶i̶t̶t̶e̶n̶ ̶u̶n̶d̶e̶r̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶t̶e̶r̶m̶s̶ ̶o̶f̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶2̶0̶1̶7̶ ̶S̶i̶d̶e̶l̶e̶t̶t̶e̶r̶ ̶o̶n̶ ̶L̶i̶t̶e̶r̶a̶r̶y̶ ̶M̶a̶t̶e̶r̶i̶a̶l̶ ̶W̶r̶i̶t̶t̶e̶n̶ ̶f̶o̶r̶ ̶P̶r̶o̶g̶r̶a̶m̶s̶ ̶M̶a̶d̶e̶ ̶f̶o̶r̶ ̶N̶e̶w̶ ̶M̶e̶d̶i̶a̶,̶ ̶a̶n̶d̶ ̶t̶h̶o̶s̶e̶ ̶t̶e̶r̶m̶s̶ ̶w̶o̶u̶l̶d̶ ̶r̶e̶m̶a̶i̶n̶ ̶a̶p̶p̶l̶i̶c̶a̶b̶l̶e̶.̶ ̶ ̶

S̶e̶a̶s̶o̶n̶ ̶1̶ ̶w̶o̶u̶l̶d̶ ̶b̶e̶ ̶g̶r̶a̶n̶d̶f̶a̶t̶h̶e̶r̶e̶d̶,̶ ̶a̶n̶d̶ ̶w̶o̶u̶l̶d̶ ̶b̶e̶ ̶s̶u̶b̶j̶e̶c̶t̶ ̶t̶o̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶2̶0̶1̶7̶ ̶S̶i̶d̶e̶l̶e̶t̶t̶e̶r̶ ̶o̶n̶ ̶L̶i̶t̶e̶r̶a̶r̶y̶ ̶M̶a̶t̶e̶r̶i̶a̶l̶ ̶W̶r̶i̶t̶t̶e̶n̶ ̶f̶o̶r̶ ̶P̶r̶o̶g̶r̶a̶m̶s̶ ̶M̶a̶d̶e̶ ̶f̶o̶r̶ ̶N̶e̶w̶ ̶ ̶M̶e̶d̶i̶a̶ ̶e̶x̶c̶e̶p̶t̶ ̶t̶h̶a̶t̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶m̶i̶n̶i̶m̶u̶m̶ ̶i̶n̶i̶t̶i̶a̶l̶ ̶c̶o̶m̶p̶e̶n̶s̶a̶t̶i̶o̶n̶ ̶r̶a̶t̶e̶s̶ ̶a̶n̶d̶ ̶f̶r̶i̶n̶g̶e̶ ̶r̶a̶t̶e̶s̶,̶ ̶i̶n̶c̶l̶u̶d̶i̶n̶g̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶c̶o̶n̶t̶r̶i̶b̶u̶t̶i̶o̶n̶ ̶t̶o̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶P̶a̶i̶d̶ ̶P̶a̶r̶e̶n̶t̶a̶l̶ ̶L̶e̶a̶v̶e̶ ̶F̶u̶n̶d̶,̶ ̶a̶s̶ ̶n̶e̶g̶o̶t̶i̶a̶t̶e̶d̶ ̶i̶n̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶2̶0̶2̶0̶ ̶n̶e̶g̶o̶t̶i̶a̶t̶i̶o̶n̶s̶ ̶w̶o̶u̶l̶d̶ ̶a̶p̶p̶l̶y̶ ̶t̶o̶ ̶l̶i̶t̶e̶r̶a̶r̶y̶ ̶m̶a̶t̶e̶r̶i̶a̶l̶ ̶w̶r̶i̶t̶t̶e̶n̶ ̶o̶n̶ ̶o̶r̶ ̶a̶f̶t̶e̶r̶ ̶M̶a̶y̶ ̶2̶,̶ ̶2̶0̶2̶0̶.̶ ̶ ̶

S̶e̶a̶s̶o̶n̶ ̶2̶ ̶w̶o̶u̶l̶d̶ ̶n̶o̶t̶ ̶b̶e̶ ̶g̶r̶a̶n̶d̶f̶a̶t̶h̶e̶r̶e̶d̶ ̶b̶e̶c̶a̶u̶s̶e̶ ̶p̶r̶i̶n̶c̶i̶p̶a̶l̶ ̶p̶h̶o̶t̶o̶g̶r̶a̶p̶h̶y̶ ̶o̶f̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶f̶i̶r̶s̶t̶ ̶e̶p̶i̶s̶o̶d̶e̶ ̶o̶f̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶s̶e̶a̶s̶o̶n̶ ̶b̶e̶g̶a̶n̶ ̶a̶f̶t̶e̶r̶ ̶J̶u̶l̶y̶ ̶1̶,̶ ̶2̶0̶2̶1̶,̶ ̶a̶n̶d̶ ̶w̶o̶u̶l̶d̶ ̶b̶e̶ ̶s̶u̶b̶j̶e̶c̶t̶ ̶t̶o̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶2̶0̶2̶0̶ ̶S̶i̶d̶e̶l̶e̶t̶t̶e̶r̶ ̶o̶n̶ ̶L̶i̶t̶e̶r̶a̶r̶y̶ ̶M̶a̶t̶e̶r̶i̶a̶l̶ ̶W̶r̶i̶t̶t̶e̶n̶ ̶f̶o̶r̶ ̶P̶r̶o̶g̶r̶a̶m̶s̶ ̶ ̶M̶a̶d̶e̶ ̶f̶o̶r̶ ̶N̶e̶w̶ ̶M̶e̶d̶i̶a̶.̶ ̶(̶T̶h̶e̶ ̶s̶u̶b̶s̶c̶r̶i̶b̶e̶r̶ ̶t̶i̶e̶r̶ ̶t̶h̶a̶t̶ ̶a̶p̶p̶l̶i̶e̶d̶ ̶a̶t̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶t̶i̶m̶e̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶l̶i̶t̶e̶r̶a̶r̶y̶ ̶m̶a̶t̶e̶r̶i̶a̶l̶ ̶f̶o̶r̶ ̶S̶e̶a̶s̶o̶n̶ ̶2̶ ̶w̶a̶s̶ ̶w̶r̶i̶t̶t̶e̶n̶ ̶r̶e̶m̶a̶i̶n̶s̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶a̶p̶p̶l̶i̶c̶a̶b̶l̶e̶ ̶s̶u̶b̶s̶c̶r̶i̶b̶e̶r̶ ̶t̶i̶e̶r̶ ̶f̶o̶r̶ ̶a̶l̶l̶ ̶p̶u̶r̶p̶o̶s̶e̶s̶.̶)̶

“b. ‘High Budget’ SVOD Programs Defined

The term and conditions set forth in Paragraph 4 of this Sideletter shall be applicable only to derivative and original dramatic new media productions made for initial exhibition on a subscription video-on-demand consumer pay platform which meet the following ‘high budget’ criteria (hereinafter ‘High Budget SVOD Program(s)’) and are not ‘grandfathered’ under subparagraph 4.a. above:

[chart omitted]”

Make conforming changes as needed.

19. Terms Applicable to Literary Material Written for High Budget Programs Made for Free-to-the-Consumer Advertiser-Supported New Media Platforms (“AVOD” Platforms) (WGA Proposal No. 26)

Add a new Paragraph 6 to the New Media Sideletter to provide that certain terms applicable to “High Budget” SVOD programs shall also apply to “High Budget” programs made for free-to the consumer advertiser-supported new media (“AVOD”) platforms, as follows (contract language is in quotes; new text is underlined; deletions are lined through):

“SIDELETTER ON LITERARY MATERIAL WRITTEN FOR PROGRAMS MADE FOR NEW MEDIA

As of February 13, 2008
Revised as of May 2, 2011
Revised as of May 2, 2014
Revised as of May 2, 2017
Revised as of May 2, 2020
Revised as of September 25, 2023

“6. Terms and Conditions for ‘High Budget’ New Media Productions Made for Initial Exhibition on a Free-to-the-Consumer Advertiser-Supported New Media Platform (“High Budget AVOD Programs”)

, Rathergood TV

Ryan Faughnder, senior editor

Free-to-the-Consumer Advertiser-Supported New Media Platform

Free ad-supported streaming (“FAST,” in media industry jargon) has grown in popularity in recent years, as consumers have been inundated with subscriptions.

“The terms and conditions in this Paragraph 6 apply to programs that satisfy the definition of a ‘High Budget AVOD Program’ (as set forth in subparagraph a. below), for which the literary material is assigned on or after [90 days following the AMPTP’s receipt of notice of ratification], except that in the case of a series, this Paragraph 6. shall not apply to any season for which the literary material of the first episode of the season is assigned prior to [90 days following the AMPTP’s receipt of notice of ratification]. Instead, the season shall continue to be subject to the terms and conditions of Paragraph 2. or 3. of the Sideletter on Literary Material Written for Programs Made for New Media to the 2020 WGA MBA, as applicable.

“a. ‘High Budget AVOD Programs’ Defined

“Except as otherwise provided herein, the terms and conditions set forth in Paragraph 6. of this Sideletter shall be applicable to dramatic new media productions made for initial exhibition on a free-to-the-consumer advertiser supported new media platform which meet the following ‘high budget’ criteria (hereinafter ‘High Budget AVOD Programs’):https://javascript:;/

, Rathergood TV

Ryan Faughnder, senior editor

“high budget”

If you kept seeing the term “high budget” and wondered what it actually means, here you go. The “high budget” designation would cover your prestigious streaming dramas, but also basic cable and broadcast shows.

, Rathergood TV

Meg James, senior writer

These budget ranges would include all network TV shows, including ABC’s “Abbott Elementary” and CBS’ “Young Sheldon,” and original streaming shows.

“*Programs less than 20 minutes are not considered ‘high budget’ for the purpose of this Sideletter, regardless of their budgets.

, Rathergood TV

Brian Contreras, staff writer

less than 20 minutes are not considered ‘high budget’”

Seems Drake’s “God’s Plan” music video has been put on notice.

“b. Minimum Initial Compensation for Story and Teleplay

“(1) Minimum initial compensation for writers employed on a High Budget AVOD Program intended for initial exhibition on a free-to-the-consumer advertiser-supported new media platform shall be as follows:https://javascript:;/

“(2) For purposes of determining applicable minimum compensation under subparagraph (1) above, a High Budget AVOD Program between 20 and 35 minutes in length shall be treated as a 30-minute program; a High Budget AVOD Program between 36 and 65 minutes shall be treated as a 60-minute program; a High Budget AVOD Program between 66 and 95 minutes shall be treated as a 90-minute program; and a High Budget AVOD Program 96 minutes or longer shall be treated as a 120-minute program.8

8 For purposes of determining the applicable minimum compensation and other terms and conditions under Paragraph 6 of this Sideletter, the parties agree that an episode of a High Budget AVOD program or series may exceed the “program length” which applies to a typical episode of the series by up to three (3) minutes without becoming subject to the terms and conditions applicable to the next highest program length. (For example, if a typical episode of a High Budget AVOD program or series falls in the 20-35 minute category, a given episode of such program or series which is 38 minutes in length will still be subject to the compensation and terms and conditions applicable to a program between 20 and 35 minutes in length.)

, Rathergood TV

Ryan Faughnder, senior editor

“may exceed the ‘program length’”

I’m old enough to remember when most episodic shows clocked in at 22 minutes because of schedules, commercial breaks and the like. Now that episodes can be whatever length, you see sitcom episodes run 35 minutes.

“c. Other Terms and Conditions for High Budget AVOD Programs

“Except as otherwise provided herein, the terms and conditions applicable to High Budget AVOD Programs shall be those applicable to programs made for basic cable, subject to the following clarifications and modifications:

“(1) Article 13.B.7.r.(3) (‘Spin-off’) shall not apply to any High Budget AVOD Program.

, Rathergood TV

Brian Contreras, staff writer

“Spin-off”

This section has to do with when a writer comes up with a story — or a story and final script — for a TV episode that the studio plans to use, or ends up using, to set up a spin-off. Think back to that episode of “black-ish” that also served as the launch pad for sister series “grown-ish.”

Click here to jump to the next annotation.

“(2) Article 13.B.7.t. (‘Development Room’) and Article 14.L. (‘Development Room’) shall not apply to any High Budget AVOD Program.

“(3) Article 14.M. (‘Staffing’) shall not apply to any High Budget AVOD Program.

“(4) A High Budget AVOD Program between 20 and 35 minutes in length shall be treated as a 30-minute program; a High Budget AVOD Program between 36 and 65 minutes shall be treated as a 60-minute program; a High Budget AVOD Program between 66 and 95 minutes shall be treated as a 90-minute program; and a High Budget AVOD Program 96 minutes or longer shall be treated as a 120-minute program.9

“(5) The terms and conditions set forth in Pargraphs 4.f. (‘Screen Credit’) and 4.g. (‘Separated Rights’) of this Sideletter shall apply to High Budget AVOD Programs.

“d. Residual Compensation

“(1) What Initial Compensation Covers

“Initial compensation for a High Budget AVOD Program shall constitute payment for a twenty-six (26) consecutive week period of use on any free-to-the-consumer advertiser-supported new media platform, commencing with the first day that the High Budget AVOD Program is available on any free-to-the-consumer advertiser-supported new media platform.

“(2) Use on a Free-To-The-Consumer Advertiser-Supported New Media Platform

“For all uses of a High Budget AVOD Program on any free-to-the consumer advertiser-supported new media platform beyond the twenty six (26) consecutive week period, the Company shall pay a residual equal to two percent (2.0%) of the ‘accountable receipts,’ as defined in Paragraph 3 of the Sideletter on Exhibition of Motion Pictures Transmitted Via New Media, attributable to the period beyond the twenty-six (26) consecutive week use period.

“It is understood that ‘accountable receipts’ does not include advertising revenues received by the free-to-the-consumer advertiser-supported new media platform unless the license, distribution or other agreement between the Company and the free-to-the-consumer advertiser-supported new media platform provides for sharing in such revenues for exhibition of the High Budget AVOD Program.

9 For purposes of determining the applicable minimum compensation and other terms and conditions under Paragraph 6 of this Sideletter, the parties agree that an episode of a High Budget AVOD series may exceed the “program length” which applies to a typical episode of the series by up to three (3) minutes without becoming subject to the terms and conditions applicable to the next highest program length. (For example, if a typical episode of a High Budget AVOD series falls in the 20-35 minute category, a given episode of such series which is 38 minutes in length will still be subject to the compensation and terms and conditions applicable to a program between 20 and 35 minutes in length.)

“(3) Exhibition on a Consumer Pay New Media Platform

“For exhibition of a High Budget AVOD Program on any consumer pay new media platform (i.e., a subscription consumer pay new media platform, or a transactional consumer pay new media platform involving download-to-own or download-to-rent transaction), the Company shall make a separate residual payment equal to 1.2% of the ‘accountable receipts,’ as defined in Paragraph 3 of the Sideletter on Exhibition of Motion Pictures Transmitted Via New Media.

“(4) For use of a High Budget AVOD Program in traditional media (e.g., free television, basic cable, pay television or home video), the Company shall pay residuals as a supplemental use as set forth in Paragraph 3.b.(4)( c) of this Sideletter.”

Make conforming changes as needed.

20. Minimum Initial Compensation and Residuals for Feature-Length High Budget SVOD Programs; High Budget SVOD Residuals for Domestic SVOD Platform on Which the High Budget SVOD Program Was Initially Exhibited (WGA Proposal Nos. 24 and 25-C)

Modify Paragraph 4.c. of the Sideletter on Literary Material Written for Programs Made for New Media to provide for higher minimums and a new residual base for feature-length High Budget SVOD Programs which meet or exceed a certain budget break; modify subparagraph 4.e.(2)(a) to increase the residual base for High Budget SVOD Programs; modify subparagraph 4.e.(2) to improve the residuals for exhibition years 8 through 12; modify subparagraph 4.e.(2)(c) and collapse subscriber tiers 1 and 2 into tier 3 for programs that commence principal photography on or after July 1, 2024 (contract language is in quotes; new text is underlined; deletions are lined through):

, Rathergood TV

“SIDELETTER ON LITERARY MATERIAL WRITTEN FOR PROGRAMS MADE FOR NEW MEDIA

As of February 13, 2008
Revised as of May 2, 2011
Revised as of May 2, 2014
Revised as of May 2, 2017
Revised as of May 2, 2020
Revised as of September 25, 2023

“4. Terms and Conditions for ‘High Budget’ Derivative and Original Dramatic New Media Productions Made for Initial Exhibition on a Subscription Consumer Pay Platform

“c. Minimum Initial Compensation for Story and Teleplay

“(1) Minimum initial compensation for writers employed on a High Budget SVOD Program intended for initial exhibition on a subscription consumer pay new media platform with 20 million or more subscribers in the United States and Canada shall be as follows:https://javascript:;/

“*Minimum initial compensation for contracts entered into on or after [the 1st of the month immediately following the date the AMPTP receives notice of ratification] for a High Budget SVOD Program that is 96 minutes or longer with a budget of $30 million or more and made for a subscription consumer pay new media platform with 20 million or more subscribers in the United States and Canada shall be as follows:

, Rathergood TV

Ryan Faughnder, senior editor

“96 minutes or longer”

As a consumer, I appreciate anything less than 96 minutes in length. Just saying.

, Rathergood TV

Wendy Lee, staff writer

Aw, Ryan, I thought we were going to re-watch the 3.5-hour Netflix movie “The Irishman” together.

Click here to jump to the next annotation.https://javascript:;/

“e. Residual Compensation

“(2) Subsequent Use on the Domestic Subscription Consumer Pay Platform on Which the High Budget SVOD Program Was Initially Exhibited.

“For use on the subscription consumer pay platform in the United States and Canada on which the High Budget SVOD Program is initially exhibited during the first exhibition year after the ninety (90) day period following the initial availability of the Program on such platform, and for each year of domestic use thereafter, the Company shall pay residuals calculated by multiplying the applicable residual base set forth in subparagraph (a) below by the applicable percentage for the period of use set forth in subparagraph (b) below and by the subscriber factor set forth in subparagraph (c) below.

“(a) Base for High Budget SVOD Program Residual

“The following residual bases are applicable to a one-time High Budget SVOD Program or an episode of a High Budget SVOD series and shall apply in perpetuity to that program or episode:https://javascript:;/

“*The residual base for a High Budget SVOD Program that is 85 minutes or longer with a budget of $13 million or more and made for a subscription consumer pay platform with 20 million or more domestic subscribers shall be the applicable minimum as set forth in Article 13.B.7.a., b. and c. for a program length in minutes of either ‘90 or less (but more than 75)’ or ‘120 or less (but more than 90),’ as applicable, except that the residual bases for a High Budget SVOD Program that is 96 minutes or longer with a budget of $30 million or more shall be as follows: $30,000 (Story): $53,823 (Teleplay); $75,000 (Story and Teleplay).”

“(b) Percentage of Above Base Rate Payable for Residualshttps://javascript:;/

*Exhibition Year 1 shall commence on the first day that the High Budget SVOD Program is made available for exhibition on the subscription pay platform following ninety (90) days after the initial exhibition date. Each Exhibition Year thereafter shall commence with the first day that the High Budget SVOD Program is made available for exhibition on the subscription consumer pay platform following the conclusion of the prior one year use period.

(c) Subscriber Factor

(i) For a High Budget SVOD Program that commences principal photography prior to July 1, 2024:https://javascript:;/

, Rathergood TV

Ryan Faughnder, senior editor

“Domestic Subscribers”

Not every streaming service publicly breaks out domestic subscribers versus international. Warner Bros. Discovery reports a combined global figure that includes Max and Discovery+.

Some examples of those that specify domestic:

– Disney+: 46 million (U.S. and Canada)
– Hulu: 48 million, including the Live TV version
– Netflix: 75.6 million (U.S. and Canada)

I’ve been asked by an editor for an example of a streaming service with fewer than 1 million subscribers. The funny thing is, most services with that few viewers aren’t going to disclose those numbers publicly. I wouldn’t.

*No residual shall be owed for the first year of exhibition of a High Budget SVOD Program or series produced for initial exhibition on a subscription consumer pay platform with fewer than 1,000,000 domestic subscribers.

(ii) For a High Budget SVOD Program that commences principal photography on or after July 1, 2024:https://javascript:;/

“(d) Payment

Payment for each Exhibition Year shall be due sixty (60) days after the end of the calendar quarter in which the High Budget SVOD Program was first made available in that Exhibition Year.”

Make conforming changes as needed.

21. Foreign Residuals Formula for a High Budget SVOD Program in the Sideletter on Literary Material Written for Programs Made for New Media and Bundled Subscription Consumer Pay Platform (WGA Proposal No. 25-A)

, Rathergood TV

Ryan Faughnder, senior editor

Foreign Residuals

Another non-sexy but ultimately super important ask from the writers guild: foreign residuals. No small thing, considering that Netflix and most other streaming platforms are now global businesses, and that non-U.S. audiences are increasingly important to their subscriber growth. Again, it’s all about the money!

, Rathergood TV

Meg James, senior writer

This has become an increasingly important tenet as television quickly shifts from its previous domestic confines and into a thriving international business. Hollywood directors also negotiated a new contract this year, and one of their biggest gains was a new structure for foreign residuals payments. (For more on that, see “Directors Guild reaches deal on a new contract with the studios.”)

, Rathergood TV

Brian Contreras, staff writer

Flagging this section for all those Parisians who hated “Emily in Paris”…

Modify Paragraphs 4.e. and 4.h. of the Sideletter on Literary Material Written for Programs Made for New Media to provide that Writers of High Budget SVOD programs exhibited on a foreign subscription consumer pay platform related to or affiliated with a domestic subscription consumer pay platform shall be paid a fixed residual for each exhibition year of use in foreign markets based on a new Foreign High Budget SVOD Subscriber Factor, as follows (contract language is in quotes; new text is underlined; deletions are lined through):

“e. Residual Compensation

“(3) Use on a Foreign Subscription Consumer Pay Platform Related to or Affiliated with the Domestic Subscription Consumer Pay Platform [footnotes omitted]

Should writers get paid more for a streaming hit?

Bonuses were a surprising turn in the contract. Click here to learn more.

“(a) Foreign Subscription Consumer Pay Platforms Related to or Affiliated with a Domestic Subscription Consumer Pay Platform with Over 45 Million Subscribers.

“(i) When Company licenses the right to exhibit a High Budget SVOD Program to a domestic subscription consumer pay platform with over 45 million subscribers and also licenses SVOD rights for use on its related or affiliated foreign subscription consumer pay platform(s), Company shall pay a fixed residual for each exhibition year of use in foreign markets (after an initial ninety (90) consecutive day window measured from initial availability on the domestic subscription consumer pay platform) t̶h̶a̶t̶ ̶i̶s̶ ̶t̶h̶i̶r̶t̶y̶-̶f̶i̶v̶e̶ ̶p̶e̶r̶c̶e̶n̶t̶ ̶(̶3̶5̶%̶)̶ ̶ ̶o̶f̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶d̶o̶m̶e̶s̶t̶i̶c̶ ̶r̶e̶s̶i̶d̶u̶a̶l̶ ̶s̶e̶t̶ ̶f̶o̶r̶t̶h̶ ̶i̶n̶ ̶s̶u̶b̶p̶a̶r̶a̶g̶r̶a̶p̶h̶ ̶ ̶4̶.̶e̶.̶(̶2̶)̶ ̶a̶b̶o̶v̶e̶.̶ ̶calculated by multiplying the applicable residual base set forth in subparagraph 4.e.(2)(a) above by the applicable Exhibition Year percentage for the period of use set forth in subparagraph 4.e.(2)(b) above and by the Foreign Subscriber Factor set forth below.https://javascript:;/

, Rathergood TV

Ryan Faughnder, senior editor

“Foreign Subscribers”

Netflix has way more than 75 million foreign subscribers (whips out calculator… about 162.8 million). Disney+ counts almost 60 million international subscribers, excluding the company’s Hotstar service in India.

“Payment of the additional fixed residual above, shall cover worldwide use of the High Budget SVOD Program on all foreign subscription consumer pay platforms for the applicable exhibition year.

“This subparagraph 4.e.(3)(a)(i) does not apply to any program or episode of a High Budget SVOD series for which the literary material is written prior to [the first Sunday following the AMPTP’s receipt of notice of ratification]; instead, Company shall pay a fixed residual for each exhibition year of use in foreign markets (after an initial ninety (90) consecutive day window measured from initial availability on the domestic subscription consumer pay platform) that is thirty-five percent (35%) of the domestic residual set forth in subparagraph 4.e.(2) above.

“(ii) However, when Company’s license includes the SVOD rights for use on the related or affiliated foreign subscription consumer pay platform(s) of such domestic subscription consumer pay platform in foreign territories which constitute fifteen percent (15%) or less of the value of all foreign markets (i.e., outside the United States and Canada), then gross receipts-based residuals for such foreign SVOD licensing shall be paid pursuant to subparagraph

, Rathergood TV

Ryan Faughnder, senior editor

“However,”

This is really in the weeds. Let’s skip forward a few pages.

Click here to jump to the next annotation.

4.e.(2)(b)(ii) below in lieu of the foreign fixed residual in subparagraph 4.e.(2)(a)(i) above. In that case, the Company shall allocate a fair and reasonable portion of the license fee to the foreign territories for which related or affiliated foreign subscription consumer pay platform(s) have exhibition rights, and make a residual payment equal to 1.2% of such allocated amount.6, 7 If the Guild contends that the amount so allocated was not fair and reasonable, such claim may be submitted to arbitration. In the event the arbitrator finds that such allocation was not fair and reasonable, he or she shall determine the fair and reasonable amount to be allocated.

“(b) Foreign Subscription Consumer Pay Platforms Related to or Affiliated with a Domestic Subscription Consumer Pay Platform with 45 Million or Fewer Subscribers.

“(i) When a Company licenses the right to exhibit a High Budget SVOD Program to a domestic subscription consumer pay platform with 45 million or fewer subscribers and also licenses “worldwide” SVOD rights to its related or affiliated foreign subscription consumer pay platform(s), the Company shall pay a fixed residual for each exhibition year of use in foreign markets (after an initial ninety (90) consecutive day window measured from initial exhibition on the domestic subscription consumer pay platform)t̶h̶a̶t̶ ̶i̶s̶ ̶a̶n̶ ̶a̶d̶d̶i̶t̶i̶o̶n̶a̶l̶ ̶p̶e̶r̶c̶e̶n̶t̶a̶g̶e̶ ̶ ̶o̶f̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶d̶o̶m̶e̶s̶t̶i̶c̶ ̶r̶e̶s̶i̶d̶u̶a̶l̶ ̶s̶e̶t̶ ̶f̶o̶r̶t̶h̶ ̶i̶n̶ ̶s̶u̶b̶p̶a̶r̶a̶g̶r̶a̶p̶h̶ ̶ ̶4̶.̶e̶.̶(̶2̶)̶ ̶a̶b̶o̶v̶e̶ ̶a̶c̶c̶o̶r̶d̶i̶n̶g̶ ̶t̶o̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶s̶c̶h̶e̶d̶u̶l̶e̶ ̶as set forth in subparagraph 4.e.(3)(a)(i) above.

“(ii) When a Company licenses the right to exhibit a High Budget SVOD Program to a domestic subscription consumer pay platform with 45 million or fewer subscribers and also licenses foreign SVOD rights other than “worldwide” to its related or affiliated foreign subscription consumer pay platform(s), the Company shall make a residual payment equal to 1.2% of “accountable receipts” as defined in Paragraph 3 of the Sideletter on Exhibition of Motion Pictures Transmitted Via New Media. For purposes of this provision, when the license includes both the right to exhibit a High Budget SVOD Program on a domestic subscription consumer pay platform and on its related or affiliated foreign consumer pay platform(s), the Company shall allocate a fair and reasonable portion of the license fee to the foreign territories for which related or affiliated foreign subscription consumer pay platform(s) have exhibition rights, and then make the residual payment provided herein of such allocated amount.8, 9 If the Guild contends that the amount so allocated was not fair and reasonable, such claim may be submitted to arbitration. In the event the arbitrator finds that such allocation was not fair and reasonable, he or she shall determine the fair and reasonable amount to be allocated.”

6 If the Company is related to or affiliated with the domestic subscription consumer pay platform that is related to or affiliated with the foreign subscription consumer pay platform, the allocation shall be measured by the exhibitor’s payments to unrelated or unaffiliated entities in arm’s length transactions for comparable programs, or, if none, then the amounts received by the Company from unrelated and unaffiliated exhibitors in arm’s length transactions, or, if none, a comparable exhibitor’s payments to comparable unrelated and unaffiliated entities in arm’s length transactions for comparable programs.

7 At the Guild’s request, the Company must make an unredacted license agreement available for inspection at the Company’s office subject to a confidentiality agreement equivalent to those governing new media license agreement inspections as described in the Sideletter on the Exhibition of Motion Pictures Transmitted Via New Media.

shall make a residual payment equal to 1.2% of “accountable receipts” as defined in Paragraph 3 of the Sideletter on Exhibition of Motion Pictures Transmitted Via New Media. For purposes of this provision, when the license includes both the right to exhibit a High Budget SVOD Program on a domestic subscription consumer pay platform and on its related or affiliated foreign consumer pay platform(s), the Company shall allocate a fair and reasonable portion of the license fee to the foreign territories for which related or affiliated foreign subscription consumer pay platform(s) have exhibition rights, and then make the residual payment provided herein of such allocated amount.8, 9 If the Guild contends that the amount so allocated was not fair and reasonable, such claim may be submitted to arbitration. In the event the arbitrator finds that such allocation was not fair and reasonable, he or she shall determine the fair and reasonable amount to be allocated.”

“h. Subscriber Count for High Budget SVOD Programs

“(1) The number of domestic (and foreign, if applicable) subscribers shall be determined as of July 1st of each year of the Agreement and shall apply for all purposes under Paragraph 4 of this Sideletter to a High Budget SVOD Program or episode of a High Budget SVOD series, the literary material for which is written on or after July 1st of the measuring year but not later than June 30th of the following year. The number of domestic (and foreign, if applicable) subscribers so determined shall apply to the Program or the episode of the High Budget SVOD series in perpetuity.

8 If the Company is related to or affiliated with the domestic subscription consumer pay platform that is related to or affiliated with the foreign subscription consumer pay platform, the allocation shall be measured by the exhibitor’s payments to unrelated or unaffiliated entities in arm’s length transactions for comparable programs, or, if none, then the amounts received by the Company from unrelated and unaffiliated exhibitors in arm’s length transactions, or, if none, a comparable exhibitor’s payments to comparable unrelated and unaffiliated entities in arm’s length transactions for comparable programs.

9 At the Guild’s request, the Company must make an unredacted license agreement available for inspection at the Company’s office subject to a confidentiality agreement equivalent to those governing new media license agreement inspections as described in the Sideletter on Exhibition of Motion Pictures Transmitted Via New Media.

“(2) In addition to any other exclusion agreed to by the parties, the domestic (and foreign, if applicable) subscriber count for any subscription consumer pay platform shall exclude subscribers during any ‘free trial period’ of no more than thirty (30) days.

“(3) The parties shall agree upon a methodology to determine the number of domestic (and foreign, if applicable) subscribers̶ tier(s) when the w̶h̶o̶s̶e̶ subscription includes a video-on-demand platform for which a High Budget SVOD Program is made and other services, such as gaming, music or free shipping.

“(4) The following shall apply to a new subscription consumer pay platform that launches on or after [the first Sunday following the AMPTP’s receipt of notice of ratification]A̶̶̶u̶̶̶g̶̶̶u̶̶̶s̶̶̶t̶̶̶ ̶̶̶2̶̶̶,̶̶̶ ̶̶̶2̶̶̶0̶̶̶2̶̶̶0̶̶̶:

“(a) Such platform is encouraged to enter into good faith discussions with the Guild prior to launch to reach agreement on the number of domestic (and foreign, if applicable) subscribers to be attributed to that platform for purposes of applying the provisions of Paragraph 4 of this Sideletter pertaining to High Budget SVOD Programs.

“(b) The number of domestic (and foreign, if applicable) subscribers to a new subscription consumer pay platform shall be determined ninety (90) days after launch, and shall apply for the remainder of the measuring year (i.e., until the July 1stimmediately following the 90th day after launch). Thereafter, the number of domestic (and foreign, if applicable) subscribers shall be determined as of July 1st of each year of the Agreement as provided in subparagraph h.(1) above.

“(c) Absent any agreement to the contrary between the new subscription consumer pay platform and the Guild:

“(i) Initial compensation and other terms and conditions for a High Budget SVOD Program, the literary material for which is written prior to the ninetieth (90th) day after the launch of a new subscription consumer pay platform, shall be those that are applicable to a High Budget SVOD Program made for a subscription consumer pay platform with fewer than 20 million domestic subscribers.

“(ii) Residuals for High Budget SVOD Programs, the literary material for which is written prior to the ninetieth (90th) day after launch, shall be calculated according to the number of domestic (and foreign, if applicable) subscribers to the subscription consumer pay platform as of ninety (90) days after launch.”

“SIDELETTER RE: ‘BUNDLED’ SUBSCRIPTION CONSUMER PAY PLATFORMS

As of May 2, 2017
Revised as of May 2, 2020
Revised as of September 25, 2023

“Carol A. Lombardini
President
Alliance of Motion Picture and Television Producers, Inc.
15301 Ventura Boulevard, Building E
Sherman Oaks, CA 91403

Re: “Bundled” Subscription Consumer Pay Platforms

“Dear Carol:

, Rathergood TV

Brian Contreras, staff writer

“Dear Carol:”

Very postmodern of this contract to incorporate a first-person letter. It’s giving “House of Leaves.”

“During the negotiations for the 20230 Theatrical and Television Basic Agreement (“MBA”), the parties discussed the difficulty of determining the n̶u̶m̶b̶e̶r̶ ̶o̶f̶ ̶applicable domestic (and/or foreign, if applicable) subscriber tier when a subscriber’s w̶h̶o̶s̶e̶
subscription includes a video-on-demand platform for which a High Budget SVOD Program is made and other services, such as gaming, music, or free shipping, (e.g., Amazon Prime). U̶l̶t̶i̶m̶a̶t̶e̶l̶y̶,̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶p̶a̶r̶t̶i̶e̶s̶ ̶r̶e̶a̶c̶h̶e̶d̶ ̶a̶g̶r̶e̶e̶m̶e̶n̶t̶ ̶o̶n̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶n̶u̶m̶b̶e̶r̶ ̶o̶f̶ ̶d̶o̶m̶e̶s̶t̶i̶c̶ ̶s̶u̶b̶s̶c̶r̶i̶b̶e̶r̶s̶ ̶t̶h̶a̶t̶ ̶c̶e̶r̶t̶a̶i̶n̶ ̶o̶f̶ ̶t̶h̶o̶s̶e̶ ̶p̶l̶a̶t̶f̶o̶r̶m̶s̶ ̶(̶e̶.̶g̶.̶ ̶A̶m̶a̶z̶o̶n̶ ̶P̶r̶i̶m̶e̶)̶ ̶w̶i̶l̶l̶ ̶b̶e̶ ̶c̶o̶n̶s̶i̶d̶e̶r̶e̶d̶ ̶t̶o̶ ̶h̶a̶v̶e̶ ̶f̶o̶r̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶t̶e̶r̶m̶ ̶o̶f̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶M̶B̶A̶.̶ ̶

, Rathergood TV

Ryan Faughnder, senior editor

“subscription includes a video-on-demand platform”

So the issue here is that if you pay for Amazon Prime (the delivery service) you also get access to the Prime Video service, which is Amazon’s version of Netflix. In that case, we assume some people are paying for the Prime suite (or “bundle”) of services, but not watching Prime Video for “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel.” That makes it harder to say how many subscribers Prime Video actually has for the purposes of this contract, where the size of the streamer matters for residuals and such.

Click here to jump to the next annotation.

“Should an issue arise during the term of the MBA as to the number of domestic (and/or foreign, if applicable) subscriber tier applicable n̶u̶m̶b̶e̶r̶ ̶o̶f̶ ̶d̶o̶m̶e̶s̶t̶i̶c̶ ̶s̶u̶b̶s̶c̶r̶i̶b̶e̶r̶s̶ to a subscription consumer pay platform in these circumstances, the parties will enter into good faith discussions to reach agreement on the n̶u̶m̶b̶e̶r̶ ̶o̶f̶ ̶d̶o̶m̶e̶s̶t̶i̶c̶ ̶domestic (and/or foreign, if applicable) subscriber tier applicable to b̶e̶ ̶a̶t̶t̶r̶i̶b̶u̶t̶e̶d̶ ̶t̶o̶ ̶ that platform for purposes of applying the provisions of the Sideletter on Literary Material Written for Programs Made for New Media to the 20230 MBA pertaining to High Budget SVOD Programs. In such discussions, the parties shall be guided by their previous agreements.

“If the parties cannot reach agreement on the n̶u̶m̶b̶e̶r̶ ̶o̶f̶ ̶d̶o̶m̶e̶s̶t̶i̶c̶ ̶s̶u̶b̶s̶c̶r̶i̶b̶e̶r̶s̶ ̶f̶o̶r̶ domestic (and/or foreign, if applicable) subscriber tier applicable to that platform, the issue will be submitted to a ‘best offer’ arbitration (that is, each party shall submit to the arbitrator its offer for the number of domestic subscribers and the arbitrator shall choose from the two figures offered). The parties will meet to discuss the list of potential arbitrators to decide this issue within sixty (60) days of the effective date of 20230 MBA. If the parties cannot agree upon the list of potential arbitrators, the arbitrator shall be selected utilizing the procedure in Article 11.C.2. of the MBA and using the Los Angeles list of arbitrators.”

Sincerely,

WRITERS GUILD OF AMERICA, WEST, INC., on behalf of itself and its affiliate,
WRITERS GUILD OF AMERICA, EAST, INC.

By: /s/D̶a̶v̶i̶d̶ ̶J̶.̶ ̶Y̶o̶u̶n̶g̶ ̶ Ellen Stutzman
D̶a̶v̶i̶d̶ ̶J̶.̶ ̶Y̶o̶u̶n̶g̶ ̶Ellen Stutzman
Assistant Executive Director, WGAW

ACCEPTED AND AGREED:

The respective signatory companies represented by the ALLIANCE OF MOTION PICTURE AND TELEVISION PRODUCERS, INC.

By: /s/ Carol A. Lombardini
Carol A. Lombardini
President”

Make conforming changes as needed.

22. Establish Performance-Metric Bonus for High Budget SVOD Programs (WGA Proposal No. 25-B)

, Rathergood TV

Ryan Faughnder, senior editor

“Establish Performance-Metric Bonus”

Another win that few observers thought the WGA would achieve is a bonus payment system based on viewership on streaming services. The AMPTP in August proposed providing some transparency into streaming viewership data, in service of one day having the WGA come back to the table to negotiate a performance bonus.

For the WGA to secure this victory is significant.

, Rathergood TV

Brian Contreras, staff writer

At one point during the strike, a former agent described the streaming model to me as one where talent gets “overpaid for failure and underpaid for success.” These changes seem like a response to that dynamic.

Add a new subparagraph (9) to Paragraph 4.e. of the Sideletter on Literary Material Written for Programs Made for New Media to provide as follows:

“(9) ‘Performance-Metric’ Bonus

, Rathergood TV

Ryan Faughnder, senior editor

“‘Performance-Metric’ Bonus”

By the way, this bonus is just for shows specifically made for a particular streaming service. A show that previously aired on cable and is now licensed to a streaming service doesn’t qualify (sorry, “Suits”). This provision doesn’t mean anyone’s getting paid more for “Breaking Bad” on Netflix.

“Company shall pay a bonus to the credited writer(s) of each episode of a season of a High Budget SVOD series or serial, or of a High Budget SVOD multi-part, closed-end series or of a one-time High Budget SVOD Program that has a ‘performance metric’ (see definition in subparagraph (a) below) of twenty percent (20%) or more on the SVOD service for which it was made (‘SVOD Service’).

, Rathergood TV

Ryan Faughnder, senior editor

“twenty percent (20%)”

The 20% threshold for the performance bonus is a high bar, but not ridiculously so. Think about it: Netflix has around 75 million subscribers in the U.S. and Canada, so a show would need to get 15 million domestic views to get the additional payment. Based on some back-of-the-envelope math, you wouldn’t need a “Bridgerton”-level smash to get that money.

“(a) Definition of ‘Performance Metric’1

“The ‘performance metric’ is calculated by dividing the total number of ‘domestic views’ (see definition in subparagraph (b) below) by the total number of domestic subscribers.2

, Rathergood TV

Ryan Faughnder, senior editor

“domestic views”

This is quite a bit different from another metric that theoretically could have been used, such as counting the number of unique accounts that viewed a particular program for a certain amount of time.

, Rathergood TV

Wendy Lee, staff writer

For example, in Germany, talent are financially rewarded if their Netflix film surpasses a certain number of subscribers who watch at least 90% of its runtime. I wrote more about this last month in “Why the war over streaming data is at the heart of Hollywood’s strikes.”

At least one Netflix German film has achieved that metric “several times,” according to union ver.di.

Click here to jump to the next annotation.

1 Company may rely on the determination by the SVOD Service whether eligibility for the ‘performance metric’ has been met for any High Budget SVOD Program. Subparagraph (f) is the sole mechanism for the Guild to verify information about the ‘performance-metric’ bonus or its calculation.

For purposes of determining the ‘performance metric’ bonus, the SVOD Service shall determine the number of domestic subscribers as of July 1st of each year of the Agreement. The SVOD Service shall apply that number when the first episode of the season, the first part of a multi-part, closed-end series or the High Budget SVOD Program is first made available on the

“Performance Metric = # Domestic Views #Domestic Subscribers

“(b) Definition of ‘Domestic Views’

“The number of ‘domestic views’ of a season of a High Budget SVOD series or serial or a multi-part, closed-end series is calculated by dividing the total hours streamed domestically during the first ninety (90) days after each episode in the season of a High Budget SVOD series or serial or each part of a multi-part, closed end series is made available on the SVOD Service by the total runtime of all episodes in the season or all parts of a multi-part, closed end series.

“For a one-time High Budget SVOD Program, the number of ‘domestic views’ is calculated by dividing the total hours streamed domestically on the SVOD Service during the first ninety (90) days after the one-time High Budget SVOD Program is made available on the SVOD Service by the total runtime of the High Budget SVOD Program.

“(Both the hours streamed and the runtime are determined by rounding to the nearest one-tenth (1/10th) hour.)

“Views = Total Hours Streamed Domestically in 1st 90 Days
Total Runtime (in hours)

, Rathergood TV

Ryan Faughnder, senior editor

“90 Days”

“90 Day Performance Bonus,” coming soon to Max.

Click here to jump to the next annotation.

“(c) Subsequent Year Eligibility

“Eligibility for the ‘performance-metric’ bonus shall also be determined for each subsequent Exhibition Year as defined in Paragraph 4.e.(2)(b). The formula for determining eligibility is the same as provided in paragraphs (a) and (b) above, except that the total hours streamed is counted for the first ninty (90) days of the subsequent Exhibition Year.

SVOD Service on or after July 1st of the measuring year but not later than June 30th of the following year. Likewise, the SVOD Service shall make a separate determination of the number of domestic subscribers for each subsequent Exhibition Year as of July 1st of each year of the Agreement by applying that number when the first day that the first episode of that season, first part of a multi-part, closed end series or High Budget SVOD Program is made available in any second or subsequent Exhibition Year on or after July 1st of the measuring year but no later than June 30th of the following year. For example, if an SVOD Service has 25 million domestic subscribers as of July 1, 2023 and makes the first episode of the first season of a High Budget SVOD series available on March 1, 2024, the applicable number of domestic subscribers is 25 million for purpose of calculating the ‘performance metric’ bonus for that season of the series. It is understood by the parties that the foregoing applies in lieu of Paragraph 4.h.(1) of this Sideletter.

Curious about the use of artificial intelligence in Hollywood?

Jump ahead to find out more.

“(d) If the ‘performance metric’ is met, the credited writer(s) shall receive a bonus of fifty percent (50%) of the applicable fixed High Budget SVOD residual payable to the credited writer(s) for the applicable Exhibition Year. (The fifty percent (50%) of the applicable fixed High Budget SVOD residual shall include the foreign fixed High Budget SVOD residual for any service that pays such residual.)

“Payment of the ‘performance-metric’ bonus shall be due sixty (60) days after the end of the calendar quarter in which the ninety (90) day measuring period for domestic views is complete.

“(e) Example: Program XYZ is a High Budget SVOD series with ten (10) episodes in its second season that are each 35 minutes in length. The literary material for the entire second season was written after [the first Sunday following the AMPTP’s receipt of notice of ratification]. All episodes were first made available on the SVOD Service on [insert date that is after the first Sunday following the AMPTP’s receipt of notice of ratification and on or after January 1, 2024]. At all relevant times, the SVOD Service has fifty (50) million domestic subscribers and eighty (80) million foreign subscribers on a worldwide basis. Collectively, all episodes of the second season of Program XYZ had seventy (70) million hours streamed domestically in the first ninety (90) days after the episodes were made available on the SVOD Service.

, Rathergood TV

Brian Contreras, staff writer

“Example”

This thing is for the most part an in-the-weeds legal document. But halfway through it, my eyes glazing over, I appreciate them including a case study that sketches things out in real-world terms.

Click here to jump to the next annotation.

“To determine whether the second season of Program XYZ qualifies for a ‘performance-metric’ bonus in its first Exhibition Year, the total number of domestic views is determined by dividing the total number of domestic hours streamed (seventy (70) million hours) of all episodes in the second season by the total runtime in hours (5.8 hours rounded as provided herein) of the second season. The ‘performance metric’ is then determined by dividing the total number of domestic views (70 million/5.8 hours) by the total number of domestic subscribers (50 million).

Domestic Views = Total Domestic Hours Streamed = 70M Total Runtime (in hours) 5.8

Performance Metric = Domestic Views
Total Number of Domestic Subscribers
= [70 M hours ÷ 5.8 hours] ÷ 50M domestic subscribers

= 0.241 (or 24.1%), which is greater than the twenty percent (20%) threshold for payment and would, therefore, trigger payment of the ‘performance-metric’ bonus.

“Assuming that each credited writer wrote a story and teleplay, each credited writer would receive an additional 50% of the fixed High Budget SVOD residual (which, in this example, includes both the domestic and foreign fixed residual) that applies to Exhibition Year 1 (e.g., $9,031 per episode), for a total of $90,310 collectively to all credited writers for the season.

“(f) Should the Guild provide written notice to the SVOD Service and the Company that it disputes whether a High Budget SVOD Program qualifies for a ‘performance-metric’ bonus, the dispute shall be submitted promptly to a third party jointly chosen by the SVOD Service and the Guild for determination by audit (or other procedure determined by the third party) (hereafter ‘audit’). The audit shall be for the sole purpose of verifying to the Guild, the SVOD Service and the Company whether the season of the High Budget SVOD series or serial, the multi-part, closed end series or one-time High Budget SVOD Program is entitled to a performance-metric bonus (‘yes/no’). The third party must execute a confidentiality agreement approved by the SVOD Service. The Guild and the SVOD Service shall evenly split the costs and fees associated with any such audit. The Guild shall not be entitled to obtain information about the number of domestic subscribers, the hours streamed domestically, the running time or the ‘performance metric’ of the High Budget SVOD Program.

, Rathergood TV

Brian Contreras, staff writer

“The Guild shall not be entitled to obtain information”

As always, the streamers hold these numbers close to their chest.

Click here to jump to the next annotation.

“The Guild retains any and all rights to pursue grievance and arbitration as provided in the MBA should a Company fail to pay the performance-metric bonus within sixty (60) days after the third party confirms that such a bonus is due.

“(g) The foregoing is effective for a season of a High Budget SVOD series, a multi-part, closed-end series or a High Budget SVOD Program that is initially exhibited on the SVOD Service on or after January 1, 2024 (even if the literary material for the High Budget SVOD Program were written under a prior MBA).”

Make conforming changes, including by modifying Paragraph 4.a.(1) to provide that the terms and conditions set forth in “Paragraph 4 (other than as provided in Paragraph 4.e.(9) below) shall not apply.”

23. Data Transparency (WGA Proposal No. 25-B)

The Guild and the undersigned Companies agree to enter into the following letter agreement:

“As of September 25, 2023

“Ellen M. Stutzman
Assistant Executive Director
Writers Guild of America West
7000 W. Third Street
Los Angeles, CA 90048

“Re: Data Transparency

, Rathergood TV

Wendy Lee, staff writer

“Data Transparency”

The guild receiving viewership information is a significant development, considering that many streaming services do not publicly share their data outside their most popular programs.

Click here to jump to the next annotation.

“Dear Ellen:

“During the 2023 negotiations, the undersigned Producers (hereinafter collectively ‘Producers’) agreed that their related or affiliated SVOD services (viz., Amazon Prime Video, Apple TV+, Disney+, Hulu, Max, Netflix, Paramount+ and Peacock) (each hereinafter referred to as a ‘related/affiliated SVOD service’) will provide the following viewership information to the Guild.

“Commencing [the date that is the start of the first calendar quarter following the AMPTP’s receipt of notice of ratification of the 2023 WGA MBA], and subject to a confidentiality agreement satisfactory to the related/affiliated SVOD service, the related/affiliated SVOD service shall, within ninety (90) days of the expiration of each calendar quarter, provide the following information for each High Budget SVOD Program covered under the 2023 MBA or any prior MBA that was made for that related/affiliated SVOD service:

“the total number of hours streamed on the related/affiliated SVOD service in the United States and Canada during the preceding calendar quarter;

“the total number of hours streamed outside the United States and Canada during the preceding calendar quarter, to the extent such information is available to the related/affiliated SVOD service; and

“the running time of the High Budget SVOD Program

“(collectively referred to hereinafter as ‘Confidential Viewership Information’).

“Confidential Viewership Information shall be provided to the Guild pursuant to the following procedure:

“The Guild shall designate its employees, officers, directors or agents (hereinafter ‘designated representatives’) who will have access to this Confidential Viewership Information, provided that each designated representative executes and returns the mutually agreed-upon confidentiality agreement to the related/affiliated SVOD service in advance of disclosure to any of them.

“In no event shall the confidentiality agreement prohibit the Guild from communicating internally or with its members with regard to the Confidential Viewership Information, provided that, in the course of doing so, the Guild shall limit such disclosure to presenting information in a summary form which aggregates the Confidential Viewership Information on an overall industry level, makes no reference to any Confidential Viewership Information on which it is based, makes no reference to any Confidential Viewership Information with regard to an individual program, series, serial, multi-part, closed end series, producer, distributor, streaming service, network, retailer or exhibitor company (or a related or affiliated entity thereof) or any transaction involving same and contains no information from which the identity of any individual program, series, serial, multi-part, closed end series, writer, producer, distributor, streaming service or exhibitor company (or a related or affiliated entity thereof) or any transaction involving the same could reasonably be ascertained.

, Rathergood TV

Wendy Lee, staff writer

“the Guild shall limit such disclosure”

There are limits though to what the Guild can reveal to its membership. Based on the tentative agreement, the Guild can share aggregated viewership information “on an overall industry level.” It will be interesting to see how this data is presented.

Currently, some streaming data can be found on Nielsen and on lists like Netflix’s top 10.

With so little data publicly available, some fans have tried to save their shows on streaming services by replaying whole seasons to increase view time. I wrote about this over the summer: What makes a streaming hit? Desperate fans ‘game the system’ to save favorite shows

Click here to jump to the next annotation.

“Because of the particularly sensitive nature of the Confidential Viewership Information, the Guild agrees to grant access to the Confidential Viewership Information only to a limited number of individuals whose access to the Confidential Viewership Information is essential for the Guild’s use of this information, but not to exceed six (6) in number.

“The Confidential Viewership Information shall be provided in an electronic format, such as an Excel spreadsheet, to [insert name of one of the Guild’s designated representatives] through secure, password-protected means. The Guild’s designated representatives agree to maintain the Confidential Viewership Information in a secure manner, protected by password and inaccessible to anyone other than its designated representatives.

“The Guild may request that an audit (or other agreed-upon procedure) (hereafter ‘audit’) of the Confidential Viewership Information be conducted by a third party jointly chosen by the related/affiliated SVOD service and the Guild solely for the purpose of verifying the accuracy of the information provided by the related/affiliated SVOD Service. The third-party must execute a confidentiality agreement approved by the related/affiliated SVOD Service. The Guild shall be responsible for bearing all costs and fees associated with any such audit.

“This agreement shall expire at the end of the term of the 2023 MBA.”

[SIGNATURE BLOCKS OF GUILD AND PRODUCERS OMITTED]

24. Minimum Terms and Conditions for ‘High Budget’ Non-Dramatic Programs Made for Subscription Consumer Pay Platforms (WGA Proposal No. 27) (Producers’ Proposal of August 11, 2023)

i. Revise the first paragraph of Paragraph 2 to the Sideletter on Literary Material Written for Programs Made for New Media as follows:

2. Terms and Conditions for “Derivative New Media Productions” (Other than “High Budget” Dramatic Derivative Programs and Series Made for a Subscription Consumer Pay Platform and Other than ‘High Budget’ Derivative Non-Dramatic Programs Made for a Subscription Consumer Pay Platform)

“A ‘Derivative New Media Production’ is a production for New Media based on an existing television motion picture that was produced for “traditional” media – e.g., a free television, basic cable, or pay television motion picture (the ‘Original Production’) – and is otherwise included among the types of motion pictures traditionally covered by the MBA. The following provisions apply to ‘Derivative New Media Productions’ other than ‘high budget’ dramatic derivative programs and series made for a subscription consumer pay platform (‘SVOD’) described in Paragraph 4 below and other than ‘high budget’ derivative non-dramatic programs made for SVOD described in Paragraph 5 below.”

ii. Revise the first paragraph of Paragraph 3 to the Sideletter on Literary Material Written for Programs Made for New Media as follows:

3. Terms and Conditions for ‘Original New Media Productions’ (Other than ‘High Budget’ Dramatic Original Programs and Series Made for SVOD a Subscription Consumer Pay Platform and Other than ‘High Budget’ Original Non-Dramatic Programs Made for SVOD)

“The following provisions apply to ‘Original New Media Productions’ other than ‘high budget’ dramatic original programs and series made for SVOD
a̶ ̶s̶u̶b̶s̶c̶r̶i̶p̶t̶i̶o̶n̶ ̶c̶o̶n̶s̶u̶m̶e̶r̶ ̶p̶a̶y̶ ̶p̶l̶a̶t̶f̶o̶r̶m̶ described in Paragraph 4 below and other than ‘high budget’ original non-dramatic programs made for SVOD described in Paragraph 5 below.”

iii. Add a new Paragraph 5 to the Sideletter on Literary Material Written for Programs Made for New Media (and renumber the existing Paragraph 5 as applicable) as follows:

5. Terms and Conditions for ‘High Budget’ Derivative and Original Non Dramatic Programs Made for Initial Exhibition on a Subscription Consumer Pay Platform

, Rathergood TV

Ryan Faughnder, senior editor

“Derivative and Original Non Dramatic Programs”

Put simply, the term “SVOD non-dramatic” here covers late night-style talk shows, comedy-variety shows or quiz shows made specifically for a streaming service.

This is actually an important category to understand when reading the contract.

People including “Adam Ruins Everything” creator Adam Conover (a member of WGA’s negotiating committee) have pointed out that writers for comedy-variety shows on streaming were treated differently (e.g., worse) than writers doing similar work for broadcast and cable. Not anymore.

Click here to jump to the next annotation.

“a. ‘High Budget SVOD Non-Dramatic Programs’ Defined

“The terms and conditions set forth in this Paragraph 5 shall be applicable only to the following derivative and original ‘comedy-variety programs’ (as that term is defined in Article 1.C.22. of Appendix A) (‘High Budget Comedy-Variety SVOD Programs’), ‘quiz and audience participation program(s)’ (as that term is defined in Article 1.C.22 of Appendix A) (‘High Budget Quiz and Audience Participation SVOD Programs’ or ‘other non dramatic programs’ (of a type covered under Article 13.B.6. of Appendix A) (‘High Budget Other Non-Dramatic SVOD Programs’) made for initial exhibition on SVOD which meet the following ‘high budget’ criteria and are not excluded as provided in Paragraph 5.b. below (collectively, ‘High Budget SVOD Non-Dramatic Programs’):https://javascript:;/

“* Programs less than 20 minutes are not considered ‘high budget’ for the purpose of this Sideletter, regardless of their budgets.

“** The ‘High Budget’ Threshold for a High Budget SVOD Comedy-Variety Program produced and initially exhibited four (4) or more times per week shall be $150,000 or more per episode for a 20-35 minute program and $250,000 or more per episode for a program 36 minutes or longer.

The ‘High Budget’ Threshold for a High Budget Other Non-Dramatic SVOD Program produced and initially exhibited four (4) or more times per week and for a High Budget Quiz and Audience Participation SVOD Program produced and initially exhibited four (4) or more times per week shall be $125,000 or more per episode for a 20-35 minute program and $150,000 or more per episode for a program 36 minutes or longer

“(The above-described programs that meet these ‘High Budget’ Thresholds are hereinafter referred to as ‘High Budget SVOD Strip Non-Dramatic Programs.’)

“b. The terms and conditions set forth in this Paragraph 5 shall be applicable prospectively only. They shall not apply to any program or season of a series that would otherwise qualify as a ‘High Budget SVOD Non-Dramatic Program’ within the meaning of this Paragraph 5, for which the literary material of the program, in the case of a one-time program, or the literary material of the first episode of the season, in the case of a series, is written prior to [the date that is 90 days following the AMPTP’s receipt of notice of ratification]. In the case of a series in its first or second season, the terms and conditions shall not apply to the first and/or second season of a series for which the literary material of the first episode of the series is written prior to [the date that is 90 days following the AMPTP’s receipt of notice of ratification]. The third or subsequent season on such series shall be subject to the terms and conditions set forth herein. Any program or any season of a series excluded under this paragraph shall continue to be subject to the terms of Paragraph 2 or 3 of this Sideletter, as applicable.

“Notwithstanding the foregoing, the Company shall not reduce the terms and conditions of employment previously provided to WGA-represented employees on programs or series covered by this subparagraph b.

“c. Tier 1 and Tier 2 Defined:

“For purposes of Paragraph 5.d. below, Tier 1 and Tier 2 shall be defined as follows:https://javascript:;/

* All High Budget SVOD Strip Non-Dramatic Programs are treated as Tier 2.

** A one-time High Budget SVOD Non-Dramatic Program that is a live exhibition of a parade or similar event that would air outside of prime time if made for traditional television is treated as Tier 2.

“d. Terms and Conditions for High Budget SVOD Non-Dramatic Programs1,2

“(1) Initial Compensation

“(a) (i) Minimum initial compensation for writers employed on a High Budget SVOD Comedy-Variety Program shall be the rate in Article 13.B.2.of Appendix A that is applicable to a program of the same length, except as otherwise provided in subparagraph (ii) below.

“(ii) (A) Tier 1 Programs shall be considered subject to the ‘prime time’ rates, and Tier 2 Programs shall be subject to the ‘non-prime time’ rates.

“(B) Add the following after the first full paragraph of Article 13.B.2.b. of Appendix A:

In the event of a series order of fewer than nine (9) weekly units, at the request of the Company, the Guild shall grant a waiver allowing each writer to be employed under this subparagraph b. on a term contract guaranteeing not less than the number of weekly units which the Company is committed to produce. If the Company obtains a commitment for production of one (1) or more additional weekly units, each writer shall be guaranteed employment of not less than the number of additional weekly units which the Company is committed to produce. In no event will the Company be required to guarantee the writer employment for more than an additional thirteen (13) weekly units.

1 For purposes of determining the applicable minimum compensation and other terms and conditions under Paragraph 5 of this Sideletter, the parties agree that an episode of a High Budget SVOD Non-Dramatic series may exceed the ‘program length’ which applies to a typical episode of the series by up to three (3) minutes without becoming subject to the terms and conditions applicable to the next highest program length. (For example, if a typical episode of a High Budget SVOD Non-Dramatic series falls in the 20-35 minute category, a given episode of such series which is 38 minutes in length will still be subject to the compensation and terms and conditions applicable to a program between 20 and 35 minutes in length.)

A High Budget SVOD Non-Dramatic Program between 20 and 35 minutes in length shall be treated as a 30-minute program; a High Budget SVOD Non-Dramatic Program between 36 and 65 minutes in length shall be treated as a 60-minute program; a High Budget SVOD Non Dramatic Program between 66 and 95 minutes in length shall be treated as a 90-minute program; and a High Budget SVOD Non-Dramatic Program 96 minutes or longer shall be treated as a 120- minute program.

“(C) Modify the title of Article 13.B.2.b.(2) of Appendix A to provide:

“(2) Minimum Variety Show Commitment – Aggregate Minimum Compensation for Programs B̶r̶o̶a̶d̶c̶a̶s̶t̶ Produced and Exhibited No More than One Per Week”

, Rathergood TV

Meg James, senior writer

“B̶r̶o̶a̶d̶c̶a̶s̶t̶”

The term “broadcast” came of age during the radio era nearly a century ago. Radio and TV stations transmit their signals on wavelengths within the FCC-allocated portion of the broadcast spectrum. But the “broadcast” language is being stricken from contracts as distribution increasingly goes digital. While over-the-air TV is still important, viewers increasingly are watching video-on-demand and streaming viewing options and so the contract language reflects this trend.

, Rathergood TV

Ryan Faughnder, senior editor

Take a drink for every time the word “broadcast” is crossed out.

Click here to jump to the next annotation.

(D) Modify Article 13.B.2.b.(4) of Appendix A to provide:

“(4) Minimum Variety Show Commitment –
Aggregate Minimum Compensation For Programs B̶r̶o̶a̶d̶c̶a̶s̶t̶ Produced and Exhibited Two, Three or Four Times Per Week

“The combined applicable minimum compensation to all writers shall be the applicable minimum computed pursuant to subparagraph 2.b.(2) above for a program of equal length b̶r̶o̶a̶d̶c̶a̶s̶t̶ produced and exhibited once a week plus a percentage of the difference between the figure derived from such computation and the applicable minimum computed pursuant to subparagraph 2.b.(3) above for a program of equal length b̶r̶o̶a̶d̶c̶a̶s̶t̶
produced and exhibited five (5) times per week, as follows:https://javascript:;/

“(b) (i) Minimum initial compensation for writers employed on a High Budget Quiz and Audience Participation SVOD Program shall be the rate applicable under Article 13.B.4.a. or b. of Appendix A, except as otherwise provided in subparagraph (ii) below.

“(ii) (A) Modify Article 13.B.4.a.(1) of Appendix A as follows:

‘(1) To a writer employed week-to-week or on a term contract guaranteeing thirteen (13) weekly units or w̶h̶e̶n̶ ̶s̶u̶b̶p̶a̶r̶a̶g̶r̶a̶p̶h̶ ̶c̶.̶ ̶b̶e̶l̶o̶w̶ ̶a̶p̶p̶l̶i̶e̶s̶ ̶fewer’

“(C) For the first fifty-two (52) weeks of production of a High Budget Quiz and Audience Participation SVOD series, minimum initial compensation for writers guaranteed thirteen (13) or more weekly units shall be two-thirds (2/3) of the applicable rates in subparagraph (i) above. For the second fifty-two (52) weeks of production, minimum initial compensation for writers guaranteed thirteen (13) or more weekly units shall be five-sixths (5/6) of the applicable rates in subparagraph (i) above. Thereafter, the minimum initial compensation for such series shall be the applicable rates in subparagraph (i) above.

“(D) When a writer is guaranteed thirteen (13) weeks or more, if the Company cancels a writer’s contract at the end of any cycle, except when the program is canceled, the Company shall give two (2) weeks’ advance notice of cancellation or pay in lieu thereof. A contract which by its own terms expires at the end of a cycle does not require any notice.

“(c) Minimum initial compensation for writers employed on a High Budget Other Non-Dramatic SVOD Program shall be $3,754 per week [subject to the general wage increases in each year of the Agreement and diversion in Item 3].

“(d) The provisions for self-contained portions of programs in Article 13.B.3. of Appendix A shall apply to High Budget SVOD Non Dramatic Programs covered under this Paragraph 5.

“(e) For clarity, Article 13.B.7. of Appendix A shall apply to High Budget SVOD Non-Dramatic Programs covered by this Paragraph 5.

“(2) Other Terms and Conditions

“Except as otherwise provided herein, the terms and conditions applicable to High Budget SVOD Non-Dramatic Programs covered by this Paragraph 5 shall be those set forth in Appendix A. Tier 1 Programs shall be subject to ‘prime time’ terms and conditions and Tier 2 Programs shall be subject to ‘non-prime time’ terms and conditions.

“In the event of a conflict between the provisions of this Paragraph 5 and the provisions incorporated herein, this Paragraph 5 shall control.

“In recognition that programs made for new media may involve a new and evolving form of production and may not be subject to the same production model and delivery requirements as apply to traditional non dramatic programs under Appendix A, the WGA agrees to consider in good faith requests for waivers to the provisions of Appendix A.

“(3) Residual Compensation

“Refer to Paragraph 3.b.(4) above for residual compensation for a High Budget SVOD Non-Dramatic Program. The limitation to programs budgeted at or above $25,000 per minute in Paragraph 3.b.(4)(b)(i) and (ii) shall not apply to a High Budget SVOD Non-Dramatic Program.

“(4) Serials – Other than Prime Time (Appendix A, 13.B.5.) (‘Daytime Serials’)

“In the event a daytime serial that was previously produced for television continues in production but is subsequently made for initial exhibition in SVOD, the provisions set forth in Appendix C, Paragraphs 2.a.(1) and (2) shall apply.”

25. Generative Artificial Intelligence (WGA Proposal No. 29)

, Rathergood TV

Brian Contreras, staff writer

“Generative Artificial Intelligence”

Tech has been chasing its AI white whale for ages, but things really kicked into high gear over the last year or two with the rise of publicly-available, user-friendly and undeniably impressive software like ChatGPT and DALL-E. For there to be a whole new contract article here establishing AI as a topic worth negotiating is very much a sign of the times, and one I expect we’ll see other industries follow.

But it’s proven a tricky issue: AI was reportedly the last subject area on which the writers and AMPTP reached a consensus.

, Rathergood TV

Ryan Faughnder, senior editor

This section uses “Generative Artificial Intelligence” as a catch-all term referring to AI technologies that create (some might say ‘regurgitate’) content approximating what a human might make. In this context, we’re primarily talking about text-based large language models, like ChatGPT.

Add a new Article 72 regarding Generative Artificial Intelligence as follows (contract language is in quotes; new text is underlined; deletions are lined through):

ARTICLE 72 GENERATIVE ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE

“A. The parties acknowledge that definitions of generative artificial intelligence (‘GAI’) vary, but agree that the term generally refers to a subset of artificial intelligence that learns patterns from data and produces content, including written material, based on those patterns, and may employ algorithmic methods (e.g., ChatGPT, Llama, MidJourney, Dall-E). It does not include ‘traditional AI’ technologies such as those used in CGI and VFX and those programmed to perform operational and analytical functions.

, Rathergood TV

Brian Contreras, staff writer

“learns patterns from data and produces content”

This gets to the heart of a question that will only grow more important as AI continues to disrupt screenwriting and other creative industries: What does human creativity involve, and could a machine ever replicate it? (Learning patterns from data and generating ideas based on them is one way of describing how human brains work, too.)

“B. The Companies agree that because neither traditional AI nor GAI is a person, neither is a ‘writer’ or ‘professional writer’ as defined in Articles 1.B.1.a., 1.B.1.b., 1.C.1.a. and 1.C.1.b. of this MBA, and, therefore, written material produced by traditional AI or GAI shall not be considered literary material under this or any prior MBA.

, Rathergood TV

Meg James, senior writer

“shall not be considered literary material”

This provision may turn out to be the most consequential provision gained from this year’s 148-day strike. The explosion of generative AI programs has caused deep anxiety among writers who feared that studios would turn to algorithms and AI to identify story lines and then quickly and cheaply crank out movies and TV shows. Some feared that AI would be used to create sequels based on WGA members’ work.

In the end, the studios agreed not to use AI-produced scripts instead of screenwriters.

“C. Should a Company furnish a writer with written material produced by GAI which has not been previously published or exploited, and instruct the writer to use the GAI-produced material as the basis for writing literary material:

, Rathergood TV

Brian Contreras, staff writer

“Should a Company furnish a writer with written material produced by GAI”

Watch this space. One of writers’ big concerns around AI has been that an employer could saddle them with low-end, AI-generated sludge and make them punch it up. This clause seems to leave open that possibility, albeit with some guardrails.

“1. The Company shall disclose to that writer that the written material was produced by GAI.

, Rathergood TV

Brian Contreras, staff writer

“disclose to that writer”

Covering AI over the last year or so, I’ve seen a lot of people — both inside Hollywood and more widely — emphasize the need for warnings on AI-generated content, sorta like the nutrition label on a box of cereal. Three-quarters of Americans polled in a recent Times survey (read our article here) said they wanted AI disclaimers, and here we can see the WGA making a similar push for transparency.

“2. The GAI-produced written material shall not be considered assigned material for purposes of determining the writer’s compensation.

“3. The GAI-produced written material shall not be considered source material for purposes of determining writing credit.

, Rathergood TV

Brian Contreras, staff writer

“determining writing credit”

Questions about credit aren’t just a matter of clout. They can also factor into how much writers get paid, such as with residuals.

“4. The GAI-produced written material shall not be the basis for disqualifying a writer from eligibility for separated rights.

“This subparagraph C. also applies when a writer, with the consent of the Company, uses GAI in the course of preparing literary material. Company agrees that it will not publish or exploit GAI written material for the purposes of evading this provision.

“When a writer, with the consent of the Company, uses GAI in the course of preparing written material or incorporates GAI-produced material in written material, such written material shall be considered literary material and not material ‘produced’ by GAI.

, Rathergood TV

Brian Contreras, staff writer

“such written material shall be considered literary material and not material ‘produced’ by GAI”

Well, here’s the heart of it. With the studio’s permission, writers will be able to use AI during their creative process — but, as we’ll get to a little further down, the companies can’t make them use it. Some AI hard-liners might bristle that the tech is being endorsed at all, but this generally seems like a win for writers, who will enjoy flexibility to, say, bounce ideas off ChatGPT without their job turning into just AI prompt-entry.

“The following examples illustrate application of this subparagraph C.:

“EXAMPLE 1:

Company furnishes Writer A with written material substantially in the form of a screenplay produced by GAI which has not been previously published or exploited and assigns no other materials. Company instructs Writer A to rewrite the GAI-produced written material. Company must pay Writer A no less than the minimum compensation for a screenplay under Article 13.A.1.a.(2), as well as no less than the amount specified in Article 13.A.1.a.(9), ‘Additional Compensation Screenplay – No Assigned Material.’ The GAI-produced written material is not considered source material when determining writing credit to Writer A and will not disqualify Writer A from eligibility for separated rights.

“Company later assigns the screenplay rewritten by Writer A to Writer B and instructs Writer B to rewrite the screenplay rewritten by Writer A. Company must pay Writer B no less than the minimum compensation for a rewrite under Article 13.A.1.a.(3). Writer A’s rewritten screenplay must be considered when determining writing credit to Writer B and eligibility for separated rights.

, Rathergood TV

Brian Contreras, staff writer

“Company furnishes Writer A with written material”

Another spot where the lawyers make this stuff mercifully straightforward!

“EXAMPLE 2:

“Company furnishes Writer A with written material substantially in the form of a story produced by GAI which has not been previously published or exploited and assigns no other materials. Company instructs Writer A to write a teleplay based on the GAI-produced written material. Company must pay Writer A no less than the minimum compensation for a story and teleplay. The GAI-produced story is not considered source material when determining writing credit to Writer A and will not disqualify Writer A from eligibility for separated rights.

“Company later assigns the teleplay written by Writer A to Writer B and instructs Writer B to rewrite the teleplay written by Writer A. Company must pay Writer B no less than the minimum compensation for a rewrite. Writer A’s teleplay must be considered when determining writing credit to Writer B and eligibility for separated rights.

“D. A writer will be required to adhere to the Company’s policies regarding the use of GAI (e.g., policies related to ethics, privacy, security, copyrightability or other protection of intellectual property rights). Any purchase of literary material from a professional writer is also subject to such policies. A writer must obtain the Company’s consent before using GAI. The Company retains the right to reject the use of GAI, including the right to reject a use of GAI that could adversely affect the copyrightability or exploitation of the work.

, Rathergood TV

Ryan Faughnder, senior editor

“reject a use of GAI that could adversely affect the copyrightability”

Interestingly, the studios want protections of their own regarding AI, particularly when it involves the use of copyrighted material.

“E. A Company may not require, as a condition of employment, that a writer use a GAI program which generates written material that would otherwise be ‘literary material’ (as defined in Article 1.A.5.) if written by a writer (as defined in Article 1.B.1.a. and Article 1.C.1.a.) (e.g., a Company may not require a writer to use ChatGPT to write literary material). The preceding sentence does not prohibit a Company from requiring a writer to use a GAI program that does not generate written material, such as a GAI program that detects potential copyright infringement or plagiarism.

, Rathergood TV

Brian Contreras, staff writer

“requiring a writer to use a GAI program”

The beginning of this paragraph makes clear that although studios will be able to give writers AI-generated material to use as a starting point, they can’t make writers also use AI during their own creative process. The end shows a place where studios can require writers use a form of AI.

I anticipate we’ll see a lot of cases — in Hollywood and other industries — where AI gets deployed behind the scenes in ways like what’s being alluded to here, such as avoiding work that infringes on copyrights. Of course, then the question becomes: What happens if AI wrongly accuses you of something?

“F. The parties acknowledge that the legal landscape around the use of GAI is uncertain and rapidly developing and each party is reserving all rights relating thereto unless otherwise expressly addressed in this Article 72. For example, nothing in this Article 72 restricts any writer who has retained reserved rights under Article 16.B., or the WGA on behalf of any such writer, from asserting that the exploitation of their literary material to train, inform, or in any other way develop GAI software or systems, is within such rights and is not otherwise permitted under applicable law.

, Rathergood TV

Ryan Faughnder, senior editor

“the use of GAI is uncertain and rapidly developing”

This is the key problem in writing language that governs the use of artificial intelligence. No one knows what the legal parameters are going to be or how the technology will develop, and neither side wanted to include verbiage that would backfire during the next three years.

, Rathergood TV

Brian Contreras, staff writer

“exploitation of their literary material to train, inform, or in any other way develop GAI software”

Most people focus on the generation of new content when thinking about how AI will impact showbiz. But there are also these sorts of questions about if and when pre-existing content can be used to train AI systems. (It’s an oversimplification to say AI “learns,” but at the very least, it requires lots and lots of data in order to work.)

A recent spate of lawsuits in the publishing world, in which George R.R. Martin and other big-name authors accused OpenAI of copyright violations for incorporating their novels into its training data, speaks to these concerns. The legal landscape here is still evolving.

“G. Each Company agrees to meet with the Guild during the term of this Agreement at least semi-annually at the request of the Guild and subject to appropriate confidentiality agreements to discuss and review information related to the Company’s use and intended use of GAI in motion picture development and production. The foregoing provision shall not be construed to waive any right of the Guild under the National Labor Relations Act, including but not limited to the right to seek information necessary and relevant to the administration and enforcement of this Article 72.”

, Rathergood TV

Brian Contreras, staff writer

“intended use of GAI in motion picture development and production”

As we end the AI section, it’s a good time to note that the writers’ onscreen colleagues in the Screen Actors Guild are still on strike over (among other things) their own concerns about automation. Indeed, some people see these questions as even more pressing for actors than they are for writers.

For more on where SAG-AFTRA’s AI situation stands, check out: “Screenwriters secured a new deal for AI. For actors, the fight could be even harder.”

Click here to jump to the next annotation.

Make conforming changes as needed.

26. Promotional Runs for New Made-for-Network Television Programs on Linear Television (Producers’ Proposal No. P-1)

Modify Article 15.B.1.b.(2)(d) to provide a promotional run for one additional episode of the first season of a new series, as follows (contract language is in quotes; new text is underlined; deletions are lined through):

“ARTICLE 15 – TELEVISION EXHIBITION

B. TELEVISION RERUNS & FOREIGN TELECASTS OF TELEVISION MOTION PICTURES

“1. United States and Canada

“b. Rerun Formula, Free Television, in the United States and Canada

“(d) The parties agree to the following for the purpose of encouraging the success of new dramatic free television series produced for a network or for The CW. No residual compensation shall be due under Article 15.B.1.b.(2) nor Article 58 for the second run (which may be either on free television or basic cable) of three (3) t̶w̶o̶ programs chosen by the Company from the pilot and f̶i̶r̶s̶t̶ ̶t̶w̶o̶ ̶e̶p̶i̶s̶o̶d̶e̶s̶ ̶ ̶b̶r̶o̶a̶d̶c̶a̶s̶t̶ ̶d̶u̶r̶i̶n̶g̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶f̶i̶r̶s̶t̶ ̶p̶r̶o̶d̶u̶c̶t̶i̶o̶n̶ ̶s̶e̶a̶s̶o̶n̶,̶other episodes of the first season of a series, subject to a maximum of twenty-five percent (25%) of the total number of episodes ordered (plus the pilot), provided the second run occurs within a two month period following the initial exhibition of each program. (For example, if the total number of episodes, including the pilot, ordered in the first season of a series is eight (8), Company may choose only two (2) episodes of the series (one of which may be the pilot) for a promotional run.) If such second run is on free television, it shall not constitute a “run” for purposes of Article 15.B.1.b.(̶1̶)̶. Company shall be obligated to report any such run to the Guild as required under this Article 15.B., notwithstanding the fact that no payment shall be due therefor.

“The Company may not utilize this provision at any time after the series has been cancelled.”

Make conforming changes as needed.

27. Sideletter re: Virtual MVPDs

, Rathergood TV

Ryan Faughnder, senior editor

“Virtual MVPDs”

Jargon alert! MVPD stands “multichannel video programming distributor,” traditionally meaning “cable or satellite TV provider” (Cox, Spectrum, DirecTV, etc…). A “virtual” one of these would be Fubo, Hulu+ Live TV, YouTube TV or Sling.

, Rathergood TV

Brian Contreras, staff writer

Ryan, you’re blowing up my pitch for “MVPD,” a cop procedural set in ancient Pompeii under the shadow of Mt. Vesuvius. It’s gonna be like “NCIS” but with more togas.

Effective July 1, 2024, remove CBS All Access from the Sideletter regarding virtual MVPD services.

, Rathergood TV

Ryan Faughnder, senior editor

“remove CBS All Access from the Sideletter”

R.I.P. CBS All Access. Since the last contract, CBS All Access was rebranded and relaunched as Paramount+ in March 2021.

Click here to jump to the next annotation.

28. Limited Theatrical Exhibition (Producers’ Proposal No. 3)

a. Modify Sideletter to Article 15.B.13., Appendices A, B and C and the Sideletter on Literary Material Written for Programs Made for New Media (with reference to Limited Theatrical Exhibition with Admission Charge of Series Episode(s) or MOWs) to add a provision for the limited theatrical exhibition of a one-time High Budget Program made for SVOD 66 minutes or more in length (and make a housekeeping change replacing “multi-part, closed-end series” for “miniseries”) as follows:

“(1) If one (1) or more episodes of a free television, pay television or basic cable series or one or more episodes of a High Budget SVOD series or multi-part, closed-end series m̶i̶n̶i̶-̶s̶e̶r̶i̶e̶s̶ (as defined in the Sideletter on Literary Material Written for Programs Made for New Media), either alone or in combination with another episode of the same or different series, or a long-form television motion picture made for free television, pay television or basic cable or a one-time High Budget SVOD Program 66 minutes or more in length, (̶b̶u̶t̶ ̶ ̶n̶o̶t̶ ̶o̶n̶e̶ ̶t̶h̶a̶t̶ ̶i̶s̶ ̶a̶ ̶H̶i̶g̶h̶ ̶B̶u̶d̶g̶e̶t̶ ̶S̶V̶O̶D̶ ̶P̶r̶o̶g̶r̶a̶m̶)̶,̶ ̶ ̶ is exhibited theatrically with an admission charge after its initial exhibition on television (or, initial availability on a subscription consumer pay platform in the case of a High Budget SVOD Program, series or multi-part, closed-end series m̶i̶n̶i̶-̶s̶e̶r̶i̶e̶s̶), the Company shall pay to the credited writer(s) an amount equal to three percent (3%) of the Company’s “accountable receipts” (as defined in Article 51.C.1.a. of the MBA) derived from licensing the theatrical exhibition rights., and, for this purpose, shall include the fair market value of any in-kind consideration, provided that:

“(a) The theatrical exhibition shall take place at least twenty-four (24) hours after the episode’s initial telecast (or, for a High Budget SVOD series or multi-part, closed-end series m̶i̶n̶i̶-̶s̶e̶r̶i̶e̶s̶, at least twenty-four (24) hours after the episode has been made available for viewing on the streaming service) or at least thirty (30) days after the initial telecast of a long-form television motion picture or at least forty (40) days after the one-time High Budget SVOD Program 66 minutes or longer has been made available for exhibition on a streaming service;

“(b) The theatrical exhibition shall not exceed eight (8) days, which need not be consecutive, unless the initial theatrical exhibition takes place more than one year after the initial telecast or streaming availability, in which case there is no limit on the length of the theatrical exhibition;”

Make conforming changes, including by making the housekeeping change to replace “mini-series” with “multi-part, closed end series.”

, Rathergood TV

Brian Contreras, staff writer

“multi-part, closed end series”

Stop trying to make “multi-part, closed end series” happen! It’s not going to happen!

b. Renew sunset clause in subparagraph (9) of the Sideletter to Article 15.B.13., Appendices A, B, and C, and the Sideletter on Literary Material Written for Programs Made for New Media as follows:

“(9) The above provisions shall expire on the termination date of the 2̶0̶2̶0̶ ̶2023 MBA and will be of no force and effect thereafter; however, the terms of this Sideletter shall continue to apply to any license agreement entered into before May 2, 2023 2026.”

Make conforming changes as needed.

29. West Coast Reruns (Producers’ Proposal No. 20)

, Rathergood TV

Meg James, senior writer

“West Coast Reruns”

What are West Coast Reruns?

On Oscar night, ABC airs the Academy Awards show twice: live at 5 p.m. and a recorded version at 8 p.m. when more West Coast viewers are home and watching. CBS does the same thing with the Tony Awards and others with the Emmy Awards. This provision gives the TV broadcaster a discount on the residual it must pay for the two airings.

Click here to jump to the next annotation.

Modify Article 15.B.8 of Appendix A as follows:

“8. West Coast Rerun of Awards, Tribute or Benefit Programs

“In the event of a limited West Coast rerun of an awards, tribute or benefit program which has aired live and then is rerun beginning on the same day as the live broadcast, the residual payment shall be one-third of what would otherwise be payable.”

Make conforming changes as needed.

30. Late Pay Interest Not Due If Writer Does Not Provide Company with Sufficient Information to Process Payment (Producers’ Proposal No. 30.A.)

Modify Articles 13.A.14. and 13.B.9., as follows (contract language is in quotes; new text is underlined; deletions are lined through):

ARTICLE 13 – COMPENSATION

“A. THEATRICAL

“14. Payment of Compensation Under a Deal Contract

“Company will pay interest of one and one-half percent (1.5%) per month when any initial compensation payment is due and not paid as provided. If the Company has failed to make such payment because the executed contract was not delivered by the writer to the Company, then no such interest is due. If the contract is not so delivered by the writer because of a dispute as to the terms of the contract and the Company shall be held to be wrong, the above-described interest payment shall be applicable. However, no interest shall be due if the writer does not provide the Company with sufficient information to process payment to the writer or other requirements for payment have not been fulfilled in advance of the due date for payment.

“B. TELEVISION

“9. Time of Payment

“Company pay interest of one and one-half percent (1.5%) per month when any payment due to the writer pursuant to this Article 13.B. is due and not paid as provided herein. If the Company has failed to make such payment because the executed contract was not delivered by the writer to the Company, then no such interest is due. If the contract is not so delivered by the writer because of a dispute as to the terms of the contract and the Company shall be held to be wrong, the above-described interest payment shall be applicable. However, no interest shall be due if the writer does not provide the Company with sufficient information to process payment to the writer or other requirements for payment have not been fulfilled in advance of the due date for payment.”

Make conforming changes as needed.

31. Notice of Tentative Writing Credits (“NTWC”) and Other Notice Delivery Requirements in Theatrical Schedule A and Television Schedule A (Producers’ Proposal No. 15)

, Rathergood TV

Ryan Faughnder, senior editor

Writing Credits”

This stuff is super boring, to be honest, but determining credits is very important to writers. General readers, move on.

A. Modify Theatrical Schedule A, Paragraphs 12 and 18 as follows:

“12. The notice specified in Paragraph 11 hereof will be sent by email,̶ ; messenger,̶ ; certified mail,̶ ; return receipt requested; or a trackable service such as FedEx, UPS or DHL,̶ ; or by personal delivery to the Guild and to all participating writers. Failure of the addressee to sign or return the receipt on a notice sent via certified mail shall not invalidate the notice. In the case of a remake, the Company shall not be under any obligation to send any notice to any writer contributing to the screenplay or story of the original production unless such writer received screen credit in connection with such original production.

, Rathergood TV

Brian Contreras, staff writer

”,̶ ;

Ryan might think this stuff is dry, but I, for one, am desperate to know why they thought it was worth switching out these commas for semicolons!

Click here to jump to the next annotation.

“̶N̶o̶t̶i̶c̶e̶s̶ ̶m̶a̶y̶ ̶b̶e̶ ̶s̶e̶n̶t̶ ̶b̶y̶ ̶c̶e̶r̶t̶i̶f̶i̶e̶d̶ ̶m̶a̶i̶l̶,̶ ̶r̶e̶t̶u̶r̶n̶ ̶r̶e̶c̶e̶i̶p̶t̶ ̶r̶e̶q̶u̶e̶s̶t̶e̶d̶;̶ ̶b̶y̶ ̶a̶ ̶t̶r̶a̶c̶k̶a̶b̶l̶e̶ ̶s̶e̶r̶v̶i̶c̶e̶ ̶s̶u̶c̶h̶ ̶a̶s̶ ̶F̶e̶d̶E̶x̶,̶ ̶U̶P̶S̶ ̶o̶r̶ ̶D̶H̶L̶;̶ ̶o̶r̶ ̶b̶y̶ ̶p̶e̶r̶s̶o̶n̶a̶l̶ ̶d̶e̶l̶i̶v̶e̶r̶y̶ ̶a̶s̶ ̶a̶b̶o̶v̶e̶ ̶p̶r̶o̶v̶i̶d̶e̶d̶.̶ ̶F̶a̶i̶l̶u̶r̶e̶ ̶o̶f̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶a̶d̶d̶r̶e̶s̶s̶e̶e̶ ̶t̶o̶ ̶s̶i̶g̶n̶ ̶o̶r̶ ̶r̶e̶t̶u̶r̶n̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶r̶e̶c̶e̶i̶p̶t̶ ̶o̶n̶ ̶a̶ ̶n̶o̶t̶i̶c̶e̶ ̶s̶e̶n̶t̶ ̶v̶i̶a̶ ̶c̶e̶r̶t̶i̶f̶i̶e̶d̶ ̶m̶a̶i̶l̶ ̶s̶h̶a̶l̶l̶ ̶n̶o̶t̶ ̶i̶n̶v̶a̶l̶i̶d̶a̶t̶e̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶n̶o̶t̶i̶c̶e̶.̶ ̶ ̶

“Notices may be sent to a participating writer by email o̶n̶l̶y̶ ̶i̶f̶ ̶provided that the writer’s representative is also given email notice and the writer’s personal services contract (or an amendment thereto) contains all of the following: (1) the writer’s express agreement to receive notices by email; (2) the writer’s email address; and (3) the email address of at least one of the writer’s representatives. The email address of the writer’s representative must be an individual address, not a general company mailbox, and must appear on the face of the notice.

“If a participating writer’s personal services agreement does not expressly “opt in” to email delivery, then the notice may be sent via DocuSign or an alternative electronic method which can confirm receipt/opening of the notice. The Company shall be considered to have fulfilled its requirement to deliver the notice upon confirmation from or through the delivery service that either the writer or the writer’s designated representative has received/opened the notice.

“In accordance with established practice, when notices are sent by email, scripts may also be sent by email.

“If the writer’s and/or the writer’s representative’s email addresses are not readily available to the Company, the Guild agrees to provide the Company assistance in obtaining such addresses. If the writer is not represented, the notice may be sent to the writer alone. If the Guild is not able to provide a writer’s personal email address within 48-hours of the Company’s request, the notice may be sent solely to the writer’s representative(s) designated in the writer’s agreement.

“Company shall retain the record of the email transmission, reflecting the date and time that the notice was sent to the writer and the writer’s representative, for one (1) year following the final determination of credits.”

“18. Unless a unanimous agreement has been reached in accordance with Paragraph 7 hereof, any participant or the Guild may, within the period provided for in Paragraph 13 hereof, file with the Company at its studio and the Guild at its Los Angeles or New York office a written request for arbitration of credits. In any case in which automatic credit arbitration is required under this Schedule A, the Guild will be deemed to have made a written request for arbitration of credits at the time the Company submits the notice of tentative credits and, in such case, Company will immediately make available to the Guild the material as provided for under this subparagraph.

“The Guild, through its arbitration committee, shall make and advise the Company of its decision within the limitations of this Schedule A. Said decision shall be made and advised within twenty-one (21) business days of the request(s) for arbitration referred to in the immediately preceding paragraph. If, in the good faith judgment of the Company, there is an emergency requiring an earlier decision and the Company so notifies the Guild, said decision shall be made and advised within ten (10) business days of the request(s) referred to in the immediately preceding paragraph. If the arbitration committee does not render a decision within said period, as the same may have been extended by the Company, the Company may make the tentative credits final, provided the terms and provisions of this Paragraph 18 have been fully complied with by the Company.

“In the event of an emergency and upon the Company’s request that the time for arbitration be shortened, the Guild agrees to cooperate as fully as possible. If the material is voluminous or complex, or if other circumstances beyond the control of the Guild necessitate a longer period in order to render a fair decision, and the Guild requests an extension of time for arbitration, the Company agrees to cooperate as fully as possible. The Company will not unreasonably deny the Guild’s request for an extension of time. Agreement for extensions of time shall be in writing and shall specify the new date by which the Company will be advised of the arbitration decision.

“Prior to the rendition of the decision, a special committee of writers may make such investigations and conduct such hearings as may seem advisable to it. Immediately upon receipt of a request for arbitration, the Company shall make available to the Guild three (3) copies of the script, and three (3) copies of all available material written by the participants and three (3) copies of all available source material. Alternatively, Company may submit to the Guild via email or secure file sharing service all available material written by the participants and all available source material electronically. Materials may be watermarked and/or password protected. The Guild may provide such materials via email or secure file sharing service to relevant individuals, including participating writers, expert readers, members of Pre-Arbitration Special Committees and Policy Review Boards, and arbiters in connection with any credit arbitration and/or related investigations, subject to appropriate confidentiality arrangements with the Company. Company agrees to promptly reimburse the Guild for the cost of copies of source material obtained by the Guild for use in an arbitration.

“In addition, the Company shall cooperate with the arbitration committee to arrive at a just determination by furnishing all available information relative to the arbitration. Upon request of the arbitration committee, the Company shall provide the committee with a copy of the cutting continuity if it is available at the time of arbitration. If no final shooting script is available, Company will provide the Guild with a videocassette or print of the motion picture.

“The decision of the Guild arbitration committee, and any Policy Review Board established by the Guild in connection therewith, with respect to writing credits, insofar as it is rendered within the limitations of this Schedule A, shall be final, and the Company will accept and follow the designation of screen credits contained in such decision and all writers shall be bound thereby.”

Make conforming changes to Theatrical Schedule A, Paragraph 17.

B. Modify Television Schedule A, Paragraphs 12 and 15 as follows:

“12. The notice specified in Paragraph 11 hereof will be sent by email,̶; messenger,̶; certified mail,̶; return receipt requested; or a trackable service such as FedEx, UPS or DHL; or by personal delivery to the Guild and to all participating writers. Failure of the addressee to sign or return the receipt on a notice sent via certified mail shall not invalidate the notice.

No notice will be sent to writers outside of the United States or writers who have not filed a forwarding address with the Company. In case of remakes, the Company shall not be under any obligation to send any notice to any writer contributing to the teleplay or story of the original production, unless the writer has received credit.

“̶N̶o̶t̶i̶c̶e̶s̶ ̶m̶a̶y̶ ̶b̶e̶ ̶s̶e̶n̶t̶ ̶b̶y̶ ̶c̶e̶r̶t̶i̶f̶i̶e̶d̶ ̶m̶a̶i̶l̶,̶ ̶r̶e̶t̶u̶r̶n̶ ̶r̶e̶c̶e̶i̶p̶t̶ ̶r̶e̶q̶u̶e̶s̶t̶e̶d̶;̶ ̶b̶y̶ ̶a̶ ̶t̶r̶a̶c̶k̶a̶b̶l̶e̶ ̶s̶e̶r̶v̶i̶c̶e̶ ̶s̶u̶c̶h̶ ̶a̶s̶ ̶F̶e̶d̶E̶x̶,̶ ̶U̶P̶S̶ ̶o̶r̶ ̶D̶H̶L̶;̶ ̶o̶r̶ ̶b̶y̶ ̶p̶e̶r̶s̶o̶n̶a̶l̶ ̶d̶e̶l̶i̶v̶e̶r̶y̶ ̶a̶s̶ ̶a̶b̶o̶v̶e̶ ̶p̶r̶o̶v̶i̶d̶e̶d̶.̶ ̶F̶a̶i̶l̶u̶r̶e̶ ̶o̶f̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶a̶d̶d̶r̶e̶s̶s̶e̶e̶ ̶t̶o̶ ̶s̶i̶g̶n̶ ̶o̶r̶ ̶r̶e̶t̶u̶r̶n̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶r̶e̶c̶e̶i̶p̶t̶ ̶o̶n̶ ̶a̶ ̶n̶o̶t̶i̶c̶e̶ ̶s̶e̶n̶t̶ ̶v̶i̶a̶ ̶c̶e̶r̶t̶i̶f̶i̶e̶d̶ ̶m̶a̶i̶l̶ ̶s̶h̶a̶l̶l̶ ̶n̶o̶t̶ ̶i̶n̶v̶a̶l̶i̶d̶a̶t̶e̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶n̶o̶t̶i̶c̶e̶.̶ ̶ ̶

“Notices may be sent to a participating writer by email o̶n̶l̶y̶ ̶i̶f̶ ̶provided that the writer’s representative is also given email notice and the writer’s personal services contract (or an amendment thereto) contains all of the following: (1) the writer’s express agreement to receive notices by email; (2) the writer’s email address; and (3) the email address of at least one of the writer’s representatives. The email address of the writer’s representative must be an individual address, not a general company mailboxand must appear on the face of the notice.

“If a participating writer’s personal services agreement does not expressly “opt in” to email delivery, then the notice may be sent via DocuSign or an alternative electronic method which can confirm receipt/opening of the notice. The Company shall be considered to have fulfilled its requirement to deliver the notice upon confirmation from or through the delivery service that either the writer or the writer’s designated representative has received/opened the notice.

“In accordance with established practice, when notices are sent by email, scripts may also be sent by email.

“If the writer’s and/or the writer’s representative’s email addresses are not readily available to the Company, the Guild agrees to provide the Company assistance in obtaining such addresses. If the writer is not represented, the notice may be sent to the writer alone. If the Guild is not able to provide a writer’s personal email address within 48 hours of Company’s request, the notice may be sent solely to the writer’s representative(s) as designated in the writer’s agreement.

“Company shall retain the record of the email transmission, reflecting the date and time that the notice was sent to the writer and the writer’s representative, for one (1) year following the final determination of credits.”

“15. Upon receipt of a protest, the Company will deliver three (3) copies of the final script and three (3) copies of all material written by the participants and three (3) copies of all available source material to the Guild offices in Los Angeles or New York and the Company shall notify the participants and the Guild informing them of the name of the protesting party and the new time set for final determination. Alternatively, Company may submit to the Guild via email or secure file sharing service all available material written by the participants and all available source material electronically. Materials may be watermarked and/or password protected. The Guild may provide such materials via email or secure file sharing service to relevant individuals, including participating writers, expert readers, members of Pre-Arbitration Special Committees and Policy Review Boards, and arbiters in connection with any credit arbitration and/or related investigations, subject to appropriate confidentiality arrangements with the Company. Company agrees to promptly reimburse the Guild for the cost of copies of source material obtained by the Guild for use in an arbitration.”

Make conforming changes as needed, including to Television Schedule A, Paragraph 16.

32. Allow “Production” or “Presentation” Type of Credit To Writer In Multiple Roles (Producers’ Proposal No. 9)

Modify Theatrical Schedule A, Paragraph 28 and Television Schedule A, Paragraph 21, as follows (contract language is in quotes; new text is underlined; deletions are lined through):

“Theatrical Schedule A

“28. d. When a ‘production’ or ‘presentation’ type of credit is given by the Company in advertising:

“(4) The provisions of this subparagraph 28.d. shall not apply: (i) to impersonal corporate “presentation” or “production” credits when the corporate name is wholly impersonal, such as “Columbia Pictures Corp. presents,” and shall further not apply to the names of any distributing company, whether or not impersonal, including Walt Disney Productions; a̶n̶d̶ (ii) advertisements less than four (4) column inches in size, teasers and special advertising.̶; and (iii) ‘production’ or ‘presentation’ type of credits when the individual with the ‘production’ or ‘presentation’ type of credit is the writer/director, writer/producer, or writer/director/producer of the motion picture and is the sole credited writer.

Television Schedule A

“21. Writing credit for movies-of-the-week and television specials such as mini-series, multi-part series and “long form” television programs (but not necessarily in the form specified in Schedule A), shall be included in publicity releases issued by the Company relating to the television motion picture when the producer and the director are mentioned, whether in the form of a “production” or “presentation” credit or otherwise, except when such release is restricted to information about such individual or individuals or when the individual with the “production” or “presentation” type of credit is the writer/director, writer/producer, or writer/director/producer of the motion picture and is the sole credited writer. Prior to a final determination of credits, the Company shall include those credits which it in good faith believes to be a fair and truthful statement of authorship.”

Make conforming changes as needed.

33. Increase the Distributor’s Foreign Gross Thresholds in Article 15.B.2.(4) (Producers’ Proposal No. 16)

Modify Article 15.B.2.a.(4) to provide as follows for programs, the principal photography of which commences on or after July 1, 2023:

“(4) After the writer has received a total of thirty-five percent (35%) of applicable minimum compensation with respect to any television film, all credited writer(s) in the aggregate shall be paid one and two-tenths percent (1.2%) of the Distributor’s Foreign Gross in excess of:

“(i) $365,000 ($375,950 for programs initially released to foreign telecasting on or after July 1, 2023) in Distributor’s Foreign Gross for one-half (½) hour programs;

“(ii) $730,000 ($751,900 for programs initially released to foreign telecasting on or after July 1, 2023) in Distributor’s Foreign Gross for one (1) hour programs;

“(iii) $1,860,000 ($1,915,800 for programs initially released to foreign telecasting on or after July 1, 2023) in Distributor’s Foreign Gross for programs more than one (1) hour in length but not more than two (2) hours in length;

“(iv) $3,120,000 ($3,213,600 for programs initially released to foreign telecasting on or after July 1, 2023) in Distributor’s Foreign Gross for programs more than two (2) hours in length but not more than three (3) hours in length;

“(v) $4,170,000 ($4,295,100 for programs initially released to foreign telecasting on or after July 1, 2023) in Distributor’s Foreign Gross for programs more than three (3) hours in length but not more than four (4) hours in length;

“(vi) $5,210,000 ($5,366,300 for programs initially released to foreign telecasting on or after July 1, 2023) in Distributor’s Foreign Gross for programs more than four (4) hours in length but not more than five (5) hours in length;

“(vii) $6,250,000 ($6,437,500 for programs initially released to foreign telecasting on or after July 1, 2023) in Distributor’s Foreign Gross for programs more than five (5) hours in length but not more than six (6) hours in length; and

“(viii) for programs in excess of six (6) hours, the above applicable thresholds will increase proportionately.

“For Appendix A programs, the one and two-tenths percent (1.2%) payment shall be triggered when the Distributor’s Foreign Gross equals fifty percent (50%) of the amounts set forth in subparagraphs (i), (ii), (iii), (iv), (v), (vi), (vii) or (viii) above, as applicable.

“For the purpose of this subparagraph (4), Distributor’s Foreign Gross shall include absolute gross income realized by the distributor on account of foreign telecasting and exhibition on foreign basic cable.

“In order to preserve the status quo in Article 58, payment of the thirty-five percent (35%) of applicable minimum under the foreign telecasting formula continues to constitute payment for foreign basic cable; provided, however, that foreign basic cable receipts shall apply to “Distributor’s Foreign Gross” for purposes of reaching the thresholds in and determining the amount the credited writer(s) shall be paid pursuant to subparagraphs (i), (ii), (iii), (iv), (v), (vi), (vii) or (viii) above.

“The writers shall receive such additional monies pursuant to the payment provisions of Article 51.C., except payment and reporting shall be due within sixty (60) days after the close of the second and fourth calendar quarters of each year in which the Company receives Distributor’s Foreign Gross with respect to the television film.”

Make conforming changes.

34. Renew Showrunner Training Program Article 66 (WGA Proposal No. 30)

, Rathergood TV

Meg James, senior writer

“Showrunner Training Program”

The Showrunner Training Program helps senior-level writer-producers and other creators hone the skills necessary to manage the staff of a TV show. Graduates of the program have gone on to create, co-create or helm more than 160 television series. More on that here.

Click here to jump to the next annotation.

Modify Article 66 “Training Program for Episodic Television” as follows:

“ARTICLE 66 – TRAINING PROGRAM FOR EPISODIC TELEVISION WRITERS

“The Companies and the Networks (the latter consisting collectively of American Broadcasting Companies, Inc., CBS Broadcasting Inc., National Broadcasting Company, Inc. and NBC Studios, Inc.) will contribute in the aggregate the following sums to the WGA-supervised fund, to be used as funding for the purpose of implementing the Training Program described herein: (A) a payment of $250,000 to be made within thirty (30) days following ratification of this 20202023 WGA Theatrical and Television Basic Agreement and (B) thereafter, two additional payments in the amount of $250,000 each, to be paid upon the effective date of the second and third regularly-scheduled minimum increase during the term of this Basic Agreement.”

Make conforming changes as needed.

35. Arbitrators (WGA Proposal No. 34, Producers’ Proposal No. 31-C]

Modify the arbitrator lists in Article 11.C.2.e.(3), Article 11.E.4., Article 11.F.5.a.(7), Article 11.G.5. and paragraph 26.a.(3) of Theatrical Schedule A as follows:

1. Add the following arbitrators to all Los Angeles lists: Yuval Miller, Juan Carlos Gonzalez, Terry Friedman.

2. Remove the following arbitrators from all Los Angeles lists: Sol Rosenthal, Dixon Dern, Paul Crost.

Make conforming changes as needed.

36. Update Sick Leave Waivers (Producers’ Proposal No. 32)

Update Article 70 as follows:

“ARTICLE 70 – WAIVER OF SICK TIME LAWS

“The Guild expressly waives, to the full extent permitted by law, the application of the following to all employees employed under this Agreement: the New York City Earned Safe and Sick Time Act of 2013 (N.Y.C. Admin. Code, Section 20-911 et seq.); the New York State p̶a̶i̶d̶ ̶s̶i̶c̶k̶ ̶l̶e̶a̶v̶e̶ ̶l̶a̶w̶ ̶Paid Sick Leave Law of 2020 (Part J of Senate-Assembly Bill A9506-b/S7506-b, including subparagraph 9 of Part J);
̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶W̶e̶s̶t̶c̶h̶e̶s̶t̶e̶r̶ ̶C̶o̶u̶n̶t̶y̶ ̶E̶a̶r̶n̶e̶d̶ ̶S̶i̶c̶k̶ ̶L̶e̶a̶v̶e̶ ̶L̶a̶w̶ ̶(̶S̶e̶c̶t̶i̶o̶n̶ ̶7̶0̶0̶.̶3̶6̶ ̶e̶t̶ ̶s̶e̶q̶.̶ ̶o̶f̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶L̶a̶w̶s̶ ̶o̶f̶ ̶W̶e̶s̶t̶c̶h̶e̶s̶t̶e̶r̶ ̶C̶o̶u̶n̶t̶y̶)̶; the Chicago Paid Sick Leave Ordinance (Section 1-24-045 6-105-045 of the Municipal Code of Chicago); the Cook County Earned Sick Leave Ordinance ̶(̶O̶r̶d̶i̶n̶a̶n̶c̶e̶ ̶N̶o̶.̶ ̶1̶6̶-̶4̶2̶2̶9̶(Chapter 42, Article 1, Sec. 42-1, et seq. of the cook County Code); the San Francisco Paid Sick Leave Ordinance (San Francisco Administrative Code Section 12W); the San Francisco Public Health Emergency Leave Ordinance (San Francisco Police Code Article 33P); the Paid Sick Leave Ordinance of Berkeley, California (Chapter 13.100 of the Berkeley Municipal Code) C̶h̶a̶p̶t̶e̶r̶ ̶1̶3̶.̶1̶0̶0̶; all requirements pertaining to “paid sick leave” in Chapter 37 of Title 5 of the Municipal Code of Emeryville, California (including, but not limited to, Chapter 37.0.1.̶(e), 37.03, 37.07.̶(a)(1)(ii)(B).ii. and 37.07.̶(f)); t̶h̶e̶ ̶C̶i̶t̶y̶ ̶o̶f̶ ̶L̶o̶s̶ ̶A̶n̶g̶e̶l̶e̶s̶ ̶E̶m̶e̶r̶g̶e̶n̶c̶y̶ ̶O̶r̶d̶e̶r̶ ̶r̶e̶g̶a̶r̶d̶i̶n̶g̶ ̶S̶u̶p̶p̶l̶e̶m̶e̶n̶t̶a̶l̶ ̶P̶a̶i̶d̶ ̶L̶e̶a̶v̶e̶ ̶D̶u̶e̶ ̶t̶o̶ ̶C̶O̶V̶I̶D̶-̶1̶9̶ ̶(̶i̶s̶s̶u̶e̶d̶ ̶A̶p̶r̶i̶l̶ ̶7̶,̶ ̶2̶0̶2̶0̶)̶;̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶L̶o̶s̶ ̶A̶n̶g̶e̶l̶e̶s̶ ̶C̶o̶u̶n̶t̶y̶ ̶C̶O̶V̶I̶D̶-̶1̶9̶ ̶W̶o̶r̶k̶e̶r̶ ̶P̶r̶o̶t̶e̶c̶t̶i̶o̶n̶ ̶O̶r̶d̶i̶n̶a̶n̶c̶e̶; the Oakland Paid Sick Leave Law (Section 5.92.030 of the Oakland Municipal and Planning CodesS̶e̶c̶t̶i̶o̶n̶ ̶5̶.̶9̶2̶.̶0̶3̶0̶.̶); West Hollywood Sick Pay Ordinance (Section 5.130.030 of the West Hollywood Municipal Code); the Santa Monica Paid Sick Leave Ordinance (Chapter 4.62.025 of the Santa Monica Municipal Code) (̶e̶n̶a̶c̶t̶e̶d̶ ̶b̶y̶ ̶O̶r̶d̶i̶n̶a̶n̶c̶e̶ ̶N̶o̶.̶ ̶2̶5̶0̶9̶)̶; the Tacoma Paid Sick Leave Ordinance (Chapter 18.10 of Title 18, Chapter 18.10 of the Tacoma Municipal Code) o̶f̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶C̶i̶t̶y̶ ̶o̶f̶ ̶T̶a̶c̶o̶m̶a̶,̶ ̶W̶a̶s̶h̶i̶n̶g̶t̶o̶n̶ ̶(̶e̶n̶a̶c̶t̶e̶d̶ ̶b̶y̶ ̶O̶r̶d̶i̶n̶a̶n̶c̶e̶ ̶N̶o̶.̶ ̶2̶8̶2̶7̶5̶)̶; the Arizona Earned Paid Sick Time Law (A.R.S. section 23-371, et seq.)A̶r̶t̶i̶c̶l̶e̶ ̶8̶.̶1̶ ̶o̶f̶ ̶T̶i̶t̶l̶e̶ ̶2̶3̶,̶ ̶C̶h̶a̶p̶t̶e̶r̶ ̶2̶ ̶o̶f̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶A̶r̶i̶z̶o̶n̶a̶ ̶R̶e̶v̶i̶s̶e̶d̶ ̶S̶t̶a̶t̶u̶t̶e̶s̶; the New Jersey Paid Sick Leave Act (N.J.S.A. 34:11D-1C̶.̶3̶4̶:̶1̶1̶-̶5̶6̶a̶ ̶et seq.); the Bloomfield Sick Leave for Private Employees Ordinance (Chapter 160 463 of the O̶r̶d̶i̶n̶a̶n̶c̶e̶s̶ Code of the Township of Bloomfield, New Jersey) (̶e̶n̶a̶c̶t̶e̶d̶ ̶b̶y̶ ̶O̶r̶d̶i̶n̶a̶n̶c̶e̶ ̶N̶o̶.̶ ̶1̶5̶-̶1̶0̶)̶; the East Orange Paid SickT̶i̶m̶e̶ ̶f̶o̶r̶ ̶P̶r̶i̶v̶a̶t̶e̶ Leave Ordinance (Chapter 140 of the Code of the City of E̶m̶p̶l̶o̶y̶e̶e̶s̶ ̶O̶r̶d̶i̶n̶a̶n̶c̶e̶ ̶o̶f̶East Orange, New Jersey) (Ordinance No. 21-2014; East Orange Code Chapter 140, Section 1 et seq.); the Jersey City Paid Sick Time Law o̶f̶ ̶J̶e̶r̶s̶e̶y̶ ̶C̶i̶t̶y̶,̶ ̶N̶e̶w̶ ̶J̶e̶r̶s̶e̶y̶(Chapter 4 of the Code of the City of Jersey City, New Jersey M̶u̶n̶i̶c̶i̶p̶a̶l̶ ̶C̶o̶d̶e̶); the New Brunswick Paid Sick Time and Paid Safe Time Leave Ordinance (Chapter 8.56 of the Revised General Ordinances of the City of New Brunswick, New Jersey); the Plainfield Sick Leave for Private Employees and City Employees Ordinance (Chapter 8, Article 5 of the Municipal Code of the City of Plainfield, New Jersey); ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶S̶i̶c̶k̶ ̶L̶e̶a̶v̶e̶ ̶f̶o̶r̶ ̶P̶r̶i̶v̶a̶t̶e̶ ̶E̶m̶p̶l̶o̶y̶e̶e̶s̶ ̶O̶r̶d̶i̶n̶a̶n̶c̶e̶s̶ ̶o̶f̶ ̶E̶l̶i̶z̶a̶b̶e̶t̶h̶,̶ ̶N̶e̶w̶ ̶J̶e̶r̶s̶e̶y̶ ̶(̶O̶r̶d̶i̶n̶a̶n̶c̶e̶ ̶N̶o̶.̶ ̶4̶6̶1̶7̶)̶;̶; the Irvington Paid Sick Time Ordinance (Chapter 277, Article 1 of the Code of the Township of Irvington, New Jersey (̶O̶r̶d̶i̶n̶a̶n̶c̶e̶ ̶N̶o̶.̶ ̶M̶C̶-̶3̶5̶1̶3̶); the Montclair, New JerseyPaid Sick Leave Ordinance (Chapter 132, Article 1 of the Code of the Township of Montclair,N̶e̶w̶ ̶J̶e̶r̶s̶e̶y̶); the Morristown Paid Sick Leave Ordinance (Article XV, § 2-89, et seq. of the Code of the Town of Morristown, New Jersey (̶O̶r̶d̶i̶n̶a̶n̶c̶e̶ ̶N̶o̶.̶ ̶O̶-̶3̶5̶-̶2̶0̶1̶6̶)̶; the Newark Sick Leave for Private Employees Ordinance (Title XVI, Chapter 16:18 of the Code of the City of Newark, New Jersey (̶C̶i̶t̶y̶ ̶O̶r̶d̶i̶n̶a̶n̶c̶e̶ ̶1̶3̶-̶2̶0̶1̶0̶)̶; the Passaic Paid Sick Leave for Private Employees Ordinance (Chapter 128, Article 1 of the Code of the City of Passaic, New Jersey (̶O̶r̶d̶i̶n̶a̶n̶c̶e̶ ̶N̶o̶.̶ ̶1̶9̶9̶8̶-̶1̶4̶)̶; the Paterson Sick Leave for Private Employees Ordinance, Paterson, New Jersey (Paterson Code Chapter 412) and the Trenton Paid Sick Leave Ordinance (Chapter 230 of the Code of the City of Trenton, New Jersey (̶O̶r̶d̶i̶n̶a̶n̶c̶e̶ ̶N̶o̶.̶ ̶1̶4̶-̶4̶5̶)̶; and any other ordinance, statute or law requiring paid sick leave that is hereafter enacted. It is understood that the Guild and the AMPTP shall memorialize any such waiver for any newly-enacted law by letter agreement.”

Make conforming changes as needed.

37. Inspection Rights under the Sideletter on Exhibition of Motion Pictures Transmitted Via New Media (Producers’ Proposal No. 26)

Modify the first Paragraph of Paragraph 3.b. of the Sideletter on Exhibition of Motion Pictures Transmitted Via New Media to provide as follows:

“b. Agreements and Data

“On an s̶e̶m̶i̶-̶annual basis, within t̶e̶n̶ ̶(̶1̶0̶)̶ ̶b̶u̶s̶i̶n̶e̶s̶s̶thirty (30) calendar days after such request, the Company shall provide for inspection by the Guild’s designated employee(s) or auditor(s), at Company’s premises in the greater Los Angeles area, full access6 to all unredacted license, distribution, and other agreements pertaining to new media exploitation of covered pictures that were entered into during the immediately preceding inspection period. Alternatively, the Company may elect to provide the Guild with such access remotely over the internet, such as through a secured link or digital locker. In any subsequent semi-annual inspection, the Guild’s designated employee(s) or auditor(s) may re-inspect any agreements previously inspected and inspect any agreements not previously inspected.

, Rathergood TV

Brian Contreras, staff writer

“full access to all unredacted license, distribution, and other agreements”

Another instance of the tools the WGA has at its disposal to monitor the studios and their compliance with the contract.

Click here to jump to the next annotation.

6 “Full access includes access to all agreements, notwithstanding any confidentiality clause contained therein, and access to all sideletters, exhibits, addenda and other ancillary documents.”

“Upon request, in a manner to be mutually agreed upon in good faith, the Company shall expeditiously provide or make available to the Guild data in its possession or control or the possession or control of its related distribution entities regarding the new media exploitation of covered pictures, such as number of downloads or streams by source and ad rates.

“This Paragraph 3.b. shall not apply to agreements concerning a multichannel video programming distributor (‘MVPD’) (or any similar service that currently exists or may hereafter be developed) or any video-on-demand service of an MVPD or any similar service that currently exists or may hereafter be developed.”

Make conforming changes as needed.

38. Renew and Revise Sideletter Re Max (Producers’ Proposal No. 34-C)

Renew and revise Sideletter re Max as follows:

“SIDELETTER RE H̶B̶O̶ MAX

“As of May 2, 2020
Revised as of May 2, 2023
Revised as of September 25, 2023

“D̶a̶v̶i̶d̶ ̶J̶.̶ ̶Y̶o̶u̶n̶g̶ ̶Ellen M. Stutzman Assistant Executive Director Writers Guild of America, West, Inc. 7000 West Third Street Los Angeles, California 90048

“Re: H̶B̶O̶ Max

“Dear D̶a̶v̶i̶d̶ Ellen:

“During the 2020 negotiations, the parties discussed a new media over-the-top (“OTT”) platform called “HBO Max” (“Max”). The purpose of this Sideletter is to confirm the parties’ agreement concerning the application of the Agreement to Max. This agreement was renewed as provided herein during the negotiations for a successor agreement to the 2020 WGA MBA.

“Max w̶i̶l̶l̶ offers over-the-top delivery of HBO’s pay television service and w̶i̶l̶l̶ ̶c̶a̶r̶r̶y̶ carries all of that service’s programming (such programming,̶ ̶w̶h̶e̶t̶h̶e̶r̶ ̶a̶v̶a̶i̶l̶a̶b̶l̶e̶ ̶o̶n̶ ̶a̶l̶l̶,̶ ̶o̶n̶e̶,̶ ̶o̶r̶ ̶a̶n̶y̶ ̶c̶o̶m̶b̶i̶n̶a̶t̶i̶o̶n̶ ̶o̶f̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶H̶B̶O̶ ̶l̶i̶n̶e̶a̶r̶ ̶s̶e̶r̶v̶i̶c̶e̶,̶ ̶H̶B̶O̶ ̶G̶o̶,̶ ̶a̶n̶d̶ ̶H̶B̶O̶ ̶N̶o̶w̶,̶ ̶). Max will also offer motion pictures and programs initially exhibited in theatrical and television markets (such motion pictures and programs will be referred to as “Library Content”). Finally, Max also offers w̶i̶l̶l̶ ̶o̶f̶f̶e̶r̶ original New Media productions made for initial exhibition on Max.

“Consumers can access Max by subscribing to Max directly. In addition, some subscribers to the Pay Television Service (such as subscribers to HBO Now and those who subscribe to HBO through DIRECTV, AT&T TV or AT&T U-verse TV, and other third party video distributors) will be given the opportunity to access Max at no additional charge by authenticating their Pay Television Service subscription and then accessing the Max platform via a log-in process. In the future, consumers may also be able to access and subscribe to Max through other means, since Max is actively negotiating with other carriers and services to offer Max through their respective platforms.

“Based on the foregoing facts, the parties reached the following understanding:

“1. All programs or motion pictures, including Library Content, made available or exhibited on the Pay Television Service and, therefore, made available on Max shall be treated as though exhibited on HBO’s over-the-top pay television service pursuant to the Sideletter re: Over-the-Top Service of Pay Television Service.

“2. Programs Made for HBO: With respect to programs made for initial exhibition on the Pay Television Service that are subject to Paragraph D. of Appendix B (i.e., dramatic programs of a type generally produced for prime time network television and comedy-variety programs), the fixed residual payment set forth in Paragraph D.3.(a)(1) shall apply if the program is available on the Pay Television Service and, therefore, on Max during an exhibition year, even if the program is available on only one of those services or platforms during the exhibition year. The ‘first exhibition year’ shall commence on the earliest date that the program is first exhibited on the Pay Television Service and, therefore, on Max, and the same exhibition year shall apply to all platforms and services.

“3. Library Content: Except as provided in Paragraph 1 above, exhibition on Max of Library Content, the principal photography of which commenced on or after July 1, 1971, shall be subject to the percentage residual formula set forth in Paragraph 1.a. (‘License for Limited Period or Fixed Number of Exhibitions’) of the Sideletter on Exhibition of Motion Pictures Transmitted via New Media.

“4. Programs Made for Max: Programs made for initial exhibition on Max shall be considered programs made for a subscription consumer pay new media platform (“SVOD”). The number of subscribers to Max for purposes of the Sideletter on Literary Material Written for Programs Made for New Media shall include those who subscribe to Max directly, as well as those who access Max by authenticating their Pay Television Service and logging in to the Max platform.1

1 Should access to Max be offered at no additional charge with the sale of a product or another subscription or service fee, only those individuals who log in to the Max platform will be counted as a Max subscriber. Further, individuals who access Max on a promotional basis at no additional charge for no more than thirty (30) days will not be counted as Max subscribers.

“Subscribers to the Pay Television Service who are not offered access to Max through their third-party video distributor, and who do not subscribe directly to Max, will not be included as a Max subscriber. Likewise, Pay Television subscribers who are given the opportunity to access Max at no additional charge, but who do not actually authenticate their Pay Television Service subscription or otherwise ‘opt in’ to access the Max platform, shall not be included as Max subscribers.

T̶h̶e̶ ̶p̶a̶r̶t̶i̶e̶s̶ ̶a̶g̶r̶e̶e̶ ̶t̶h̶a̶t̶ ̶H̶B̶O̶ ̶M̶a̶x̶ ̶s̶h̶a̶l̶l̶ ̶b̶e̶ ̶c̶o̶n̶s̶i̶d̶e̶r̶e̶d̶ ̶t̶o̶ ̶b̶e̶ ̶a̶ ̶s̶e̶r̶v̶i̶c̶e̶ ̶w̶i̶t̶h̶ ̶o̶v̶e̶r̶ ̶f̶i̶v̶e̶ ̶m̶i̶l̶l̶i̶o̶n̶ ̶(̶5̶,̶0̶0̶0̶,̶0̶0̶0̶)̶ ̶b̶u̶t̶ ̶f̶e̶w̶e̶r̶ ̶t̶h̶a̶n̶ ̶t̶w̶e̶n̶t̶y̶ ̶m̶i̶l̶l̶i̶o̶n̶ ̶(̶2̶0̶,̶0̶0̶0̶,̶0̶0̶0̶)̶ ̶d̶o̶m̶e̶s̶t̶i̶c̶ ̶s̶u̶b̶s̶c̶r̶i̶b̶e̶r̶s̶ ̶d̶u̶r̶i̶n̶g̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶p̶e̶r̶i̶o̶d̶ ̶f̶r̶o̶m̶ ̶M̶a̶y̶ ̶2̶,̶ ̶2̶0̶2̶0̶ ̶t̶o̶ ̶J̶u̶n̶e̶ ̶3̶0̶,̶ ̶2̶0̶2̶1̶.̶ ̶D̶u̶r̶i̶n̶g̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶s̶e̶c̶o̶n̶d̶ ̶a̶n̶d̶ ̶t̶h̶i̶r̶d̶ ̶y̶e̶a̶r̶s̶ ̶o̶f̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶A̶g̶r̶e̶e̶m̶e̶n̶t̶,̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶p̶a̶r̶t̶i̶e̶s̶ ̶s̶h̶a̶l̶l̶ ̶d̶e̶t̶e̶r̶m̶i̶n̶e̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶s̶u̶b̶s̶c̶r̶i̶b̶e̶r̶ ̶t̶i̶e̶r̶ ̶e̶f̶f̶e̶c̶t̶i̶v̶e̶ ̶J̶u̶l̶y̶ ̶1̶,̶ ̶2̶0̶2̶1̶ ̶a̶n̶d̶ ̶J̶u̶l̶y̶ ̶1̶,̶ ̶2̶0̶2̶2̶,̶ ̶r̶e̶s̶p̶e̶c̶t̶i̶v̶e̶l̶y̶,̶ ̶i̶n̶ ̶a̶c̶c̶o̶r̶d̶a̶n̶c̶e̶ ̶w̶i̶t̶h̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶p̶r̶o̶v̶i̶s̶i̶o̶n̶s̶ ̶o̶f̶ ̶t̶h̶i̶s̶ ̶S̶i̶d̶e̶l̶e̶t̶t̶e̶r̶.̶ ̶

“The parties recognize that Max is a new and emerging platform, and that its business model is subject to change. Therefore, the provisions of this Sideletter shall expire on the termination date of the 2023 2̶0̶2̶0̶ MBA and will be of no force and effect thereafter; however, this Sideletter shall continue to apply to programs, the principal photography of which commenced on or before the termination date of this Sideletter, or which were subject to a license agreement entered into on or before the termination date of this Sideletter. No later than sixty (60) days before the termination date of the 2023 2̶0̶2̶0̶ MBA, the parties will meet to negotiate any changes to this Sideletter.

“The parties agree that programs made for H̶B̶O̶ Max under a predecessor MBA to the 2023 2̶0̶2̶0̶MBA are programs made for a subscription video on demand service (and not programs made for pay television) and agree to withdraw and waive any current or future claim contending otherwise.

“Please indicate your concurrence with the foregoing by signing in the space for your signature set forth below.

“Sincerely

“By: /s/ Carol A. Lombardini
Carol A. Lombardini
President, AMPTP

“ACCEPTED AND AGREED:

“WRITERS GUILD OF AMERICA, WEST, INC. on behalf of itself and its affiliate, WRITERS GUILD OF AMERICA, EAST, INC.

“By: /s/ D̶a̶v̶i̶d̶ ̶J̶.̶ ̶Y̶o̶u̶n̶g̶ Ellen M. Stutzman D̶a̶v̶i̶d̶ ̶J̶.̶ ̶Y̶o̶u̶n̶g̶ Ellen M. Stutzman
Assistant Executive Director, WGAW Chief Negotiator”

Make conforming changes as needed.

, Rathergood TV

39. Other Housekeeping (Producers’ Proposal No. 33)

Eliminate footnote 2 in Paragraph 4.a.(2)(b) and footnote 4 in Paragraph 4.a.(3) in the Sideletter on Literary Material Written for Programs Made for New Media in order to remove an obsolete requirement that the Company notify the Guild of license agreements entered into prior to August 2, 2020 which cover literary material written on or after August 2, 2020.

40. Renew Sunset Clauses (Producers’ Proposal No. 34-A)

Renew all sunset clauses for the term of the 2023 MBA.

All sunset clauses shall be renewed for the term of the 2023 MBA. The foregoing includes, but is not limited to, Sideletter No. 2 to Article 15.B.1.b.(2)(c), “Experiment in Syndication of Half-Hour Series in Markets Representing 50% or Fewer of U.S. Television Households” and the Sideletter to Article 15.B.13., Appendices A, B and C and the Sideletter on Literary Material Written for Programs Made for New Media re: Limited Theatrical Exhibition with Admission Charge of Series Episode(s) or MOWs and the Sideletter on Residuals for Made-for-Television Motion Pictures or SVOD Programs When Initial Exhibition is On a Different Television Platform or in New Media.

Make conforming changes as needed.

41. Renew Sideletter on Tri-Guild Audit Program (WGA Proposal No. 35, Producers’ Proposal No. 28)

Renew Sideletter on Tri-Guild Audit Program as follows:

Provided that the DGA and SAG-AFTRA also agree to continue participating in the Tri-Guild Audit Program, Companies agree to renew funding at the same amounts provided during the term of the 2020 WGA MBA. In the event that only one of the DGA and SAG-AFTRA agree to continue participating in the Tri-Guild Audit Program, Companies agree to renew funding at two-thirds (2/3) of the amounts provided during the term of the 2020 WGA MBA (i.e., up to $247,333 for the period July 1 through June 30 of each year of the Agreement, not to exceed an aggregate of $742,000 during the term of the Agreement, with the Companies’ share of the auditor’s fees to be calculated by multiplying the accounting fees by a fraction, the numerator of which is $247,333 and the denominator of which is $342,991).

The Companies’ obligation to fund the Tri-Guild Audit Program shall not become effective until the first day of the first quarter starting on or after July 1, 2023 on which at least two of the WGA, DGA and SAG-AFTRA have: (1) agreed to continue participating in the Tri-Guild Audit Program; and (2) ratified a successor collective bargaining agreement to their 2020 agreements which are effective on or before the first day of the quarter.

Make conforming changes as needed.

AGREED AND ACCEPTED:

WRITERS GUILD OF AMERICA, WEST, INC. on behalf of itself and its affiliate, WRITERS GUILD OF AMERICA, EAST, INC.

Ellen M. Stutzman
Assistant Executive Director
Chief Negotiator

The named respective signatory companies represented by the ALLIANCE OF MOTION PICTURE AND TELEVISION PRODUCERS, INC.

AMERICAN BROADCASTING COMPANIES, INC., An indirect wholly-owned subsidiary of ABC, Inc.

CBS BROADCASTING, INC.

NBCUNIVERSAL MEDIA, LLC and UNIVERSAL TELEVISION LLC

EXHIBIT A

2023 MBA NEGOTIATIONS AUTHORIZATION LIST

, Rathergood TV

Meg James, senior writer

“2023 MBA NEGOTIATIONS AUTHORIZATION LIST”

Look no further than this long list of production companies to understand the magnitude of the production shutdowns this year.

The signatories include the lions of traditional entertainment, such as ABC Studios, HBO Films, Paramount Pictures, Universal Pictures, Walt Disney Pictures and Warner Bros. Pictures. You’ll also see disrupters including Amazon Studios. There are medium-sized studios like Legendary Pictures and New Regency Productions, as well as smaller shingles such as Hop, Skip & Jump Productions, Ruff Draft Productions and Salamander Film Productions.

Click here to jump to the next annotation.

12:05 AM Productions, LLC
1440 Productions LLC
20th Century Studios, Inc.
30WEST Destroyer, LLC
30WEST Devco, LLC
30WEST VOA, LLC
40 North Productions, LLC
66 Degrees North Post LLC
75S Film Development, LLC
4423 Productions LLC

ABC Signature, LLC
ABC Signature Development, Inc.

ABC Studios New York, LLC

Abominable Pictures, Inc.

Acacia Productions, Inc.

Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences

Acme Writing, LLC

Action Films, LLC

Alameda Productions, LLC

Albemarle Productions, Inc.

Alive and Kicking, Inc.

Amargoso Films LLC

Amazon Studios LLC

Ambient Sounds Productions LLC

American Film Institute, Inc.

American Writer LLC

Anonymous Content, LLC

Apple Development LLC

Appleton Productions, Inc.

Archer Dude Development, LLC

Aries Pictures LLC

Ashland Productions, Inc.

Atlantic 2.1 Entertainment Group, Inc.

Auckland Productions, Inc.

Avery Pix, Inc.

BBP DevCo, LLC

BBP West BIB, LLC

B-Cam Productions LLC

Backlight Productions LLC

Base Light Productions LLC

Bee Holder Productions, LLC

Behave Productions, Inc.

Bell-Phillip Television Productions, Inc.

Blink49 Productions Inc.

Bohemian Pirate Productions, Inc.

Bonanza Productions Inc.

Breakout Kings Productions LLC

Brightstar TFCF Productions LLC

Camdrew Productions LLC

Carnival Row Productions, LLC

CBS Studios Inc.

Chasing the Rebel Productions, LLC

Claymore Entertainment Company, LLC

Cloverleaf Productions, Inc.

Coltrane, LLC

Columbia Pictures Hybrid Productions, Inc.

Columbia Pictures Industries, Inc.

Columbia Tristar Television, Inc.

Corday Productions, Inc.

Country Music Association, Inc.

CP Writers, LLC

CPT Holdings, Inc.

Cranktown Productions Inc.

Creative Pen & Ink Corporation

Crew Neck Productions

Crossed Pens Development LLC

Crystal Lake Entertainment, Inc.

Culture Crew Productions, LLC

Dakota North Entertainment, Inc.

Danjaq LLC

Delta Blues Productions LLC

Diablo Details, LLC

dick clark productions, llc

Dig This Productions, LLC

Dingli Development LLC

DLT Entertainment Ltd.

Double Nickel Media, Inc.

DW Dramatic Television, L.L.C.

DW Films, L.L.C.

DW SKG TV, L.L.C.

DW Television, L.L.C.

Dyminium Productions, LLC

ELP Communications

Entertainment Content Development, LLC

EP Development, Inc.

Epic Level Entertainment, Ltd.

Evamere Entertainment LLC

Evergreen Pictures LLC

Everlast AD LLC

Eye on the Ball Enterprises, Inc.

Eye Productions Inc.

Film 49 Productions, Inc.

FilmAction, LLC

Fond Geparda Films, LLC

Forge Pictures Inc.

Foundation Productions, Inc.

Founding Fathers, LLC

Going Local Productions, LLC

Good Universe Development, LLC

GPEC Inc.

GWave Productions, LLC

Halberd Productions, Inc.

HBO Films, Inc.

Head First Productions, P.C.

Hop, Skip & Jump Productions, Inc.

Horizon Productions, Inc.

Horizon Scripted Television Inc.

Hostage Productions, Inc.

Hydronaut Productions, LLC

Inclined Productions, Inc.

Indiana Entertainment, Inc.

Irony East LLC

It’s A Laugh Productions, Inc.

Jay Squared Productions LLC

Jax Media, LLC

Kapital Productions, LLC

Katy Mac Session Productions

Keep Calm and Carry On Productions, Inc.

KEL Entertainment, LLC

Ken Ehrlich Productions, Inc.

Kenwood TV Productions, Inc.

Keystone TV Productions LLC

KSC Development, LLC

Kyaraben, LLC

Larry A. Thompson Organization, Incorporated

Lastamazon Productions LLC

Lava Films LLC

LD Development LLC

LE Development LLC

Legendary Pictures Productions, LLC

Legendary Television Productions, LLC

Leon Entertainment LLC

Leon Films USA LLC

LGGL TV Development Productions, LLC

Lightspeed Films, LLC

Lily Belle Media Development LLC

Lily Pond Productions LLC

Lima St. Productions LLC

Linear Productions LLC

Lions Gate Television Development, LLC

Living Proof Productions, LLC

Madison Productions, Inc.

Main Gate Productions LLC

Main Lot Productions LLC

Mandalay Development, LLC

Mandalay Teleplays, LLC

Mariner Projects, LLC

Mercury Two LLC

Mesquite Productions, Inc.

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Pictures Inc.

MGM Television Entertainment Inc.

Mighty Pen, LLC

Milk Street Productions, LLC

Minderbinder Enterprises, LLC

Minim Productions, Inc.

Montrose Productions, Inc.

Moon Spin Films, LLC

MP Acquisitions, LLC

MVL Productions LLC

My Leafs, LLC

Narcos Productions LLC

Newgame Films Inc.

New Line Productions, Inc.

New Regency Productions, Inc.

Next Step Productions LLC

NG Channel Wren, LLC

NM Talent Inc.

Nobrose Development, LLC

NRP Development, LLC

NS Pictures, Inc.

NTCP USA Development LLC

NVTS Productions, LLC

October Holdings, Inc.

Olive Productions, LLC

Olive Avenue Productions LLC

Once Upon A Time Productions, LLC

Onda Entertainment, Inc.

One Eighty Productions LLC

On the Brink Productions, Inc.

Open 4 Business Productions LLC

Opposite Loft, LLC

Optimum Productions

Orange Cone Productions LLC

Orchard Road Productions, LLC

Over the Pond Productions, Inc.

Pacific 2.1 Entertainment Group, Inc.

Palladin Productions LLC

Papatime Development, LLC

Paramount Pictures Corporation

Park Court Productions, Inc.

Pash Features DC LLC

Patch Bay Productions LLC

Peaches Productions LLC

Perdido Productions, Inc.

Perryman, LLC

Pet II Productions, Inc.

Picrow, Inc. dba Pictures in a Row

Picrow Streaming Inc.

PM Content LLC

Primrose SDC LLC

Prodco, Inc.

Produced Bayou, Inc.

Pod Development, LLC

Pond Writer, LLC

PP21 Productions LLC

Proximity Productions LLC

Q and Shu Global Industries, LLC dba Paperclip Ltd.

Ralph Edwards Productions

Ralph Edwards/Stu Billett Productions

RC Signatory LLC

Real Fiction Productions, LLC

Redweed Productions, LLC

Relentless Productions, LLC

Remote Broadcasting, Inc.

Renovo Media Group LLC

RKO Pictures, LLC

Road Development, Inc.

Rose and Bee LLC

Rubin Productions LLC

Ruff Draft Productions, LLC

S8 Writers, LLC

Salamander Film Productions, Inc.

Salty Pictures, Inc.

Same Page Development, LLC

San Vicente Productions, Inc.

SCFV Development, Inc.

Scholastic Entertainment Inc.

Scott Free Productions, Inc.

Script Movie Inc.

Sequoia Productions, Inc.

Shaftesbury Avenue LLC

Showtime Pictures Development Company

Signatory LLC

Silent Development Corp.

Silver Spring Road Films, Inc.

Singular Productions LLC

Slew Pictures Inc.

Sonny Boy Productions LLC

Sony Pictures Television Inc.

South Circle Productions LLC

South Rock Productions LLC

Spacebound, LLC

Sparky Productions Inc.

SPF Entertainment, LLC

Sprout House Productions, LLC

St. Giles LLC

Stalwart Productions LLC

Starlight Film LLC

Starz Family Productions, LLC

Starz Heels Productions, LLC

Starz P Town Productions, LLC

Starz Valley Productions, LLC

Stash Productions Inc.

Steven James, LLC

Storybuilders, LLC

, Rathergood TV

Ryan Faughnder, senior editor

“Storybuilders, LLC”

Did you notice a big name missing from the list? Netflix wasn’t in the N section. Here it is, listed instead as Storybuilders, LLC.

Click here to jump to the last annotation.

Storyteller Development Co., LLC

Storyteller TV Development Co., LLC

Story Telling, Inc.

Streamhouse Productions, LLC

Streamroom Productions, LLC

Stu Segall Productions, Inc.

Stuart Street Digital Studios LLC

Subtle Differences Productions, Inc.

Summit Entertainment Development Services

Summer 1, LLC

Sunset Television Productions, LLC

Talking Wall Pictures, Inc.

The De Laurentiis Company

The Imagine Writers Lab, LLC

The Place To Be LLC

Time of Day Media LLC

Time Travel Unlimited, LLC

Tin Roof Pictures LLC

Topanga Productions, Inc.

Tornante Productions, LLC

TPSC Development, LLC

Trip Media Inc.

Triple Point Productions LLC

Tristar Pictures, Inc.

Tristar Television, Inc.

TVM Productions, Inc.

Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation

Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation d/b/a 20th Television

Universal Cable Productions Development LLC

Universal City Studios LLC

Universal Content Productions LLC

Universal Network Programming LLC

Valleycrest Productions LTD

Vendome Development West, LLC

Vertical Hold Productions LLC

Village Roadshow Productions Inc.

VS Films Development LLC

VT Seed, LLC

Walt Disney Pictures

Wanderlust Entertainment II, Inc.

Warner Bros. Pictures

Warner Bros. Television

Warner Media Entertainment Pages, Inc.

Warner Specialty Productions Inc.

Waveform Productions LLC

West 150 Productions, LLC

wiip Development, LLC

Wiley Optics, Inc.

Willow and Oak, Inc.

Wishful Productions, LLC

Woodridge Productions, Inc.

Woodrow House Productions LLC

Wordsmith, LLC

YANDR Productions, LLC

YaYa Productions, LLC

YLK Development, LLC

YNFS Productions LLC

Yojimbo Productions LLC


Discover more from Rathergood TV

Subscribe to get the latest posts to your email.

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Back to top

Discover more from Rathergood TV

Subscribe now to keep reading and get access to the full archive.

Continue reading